Why are my mare's ears back during riding /jumping ? Review my video
 
 

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Why are my mare's ears back during riding /jumping ? Review my video

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    10-23-2012, 08:19 PM
  #1
Banned
Question Why are my mare's ears back during riding /jumping ? Review my video

Okay so, I'm going to embed a video (hopefully , if it works) of me working with my 7 year old Percheron cross. Lately we've started canter work. Misty is very green and needs more miles but seems to be excited to jump (small ones) and that is also sometimes incorporated into our sessions. You will see that she looks soooooooo much happier while free lunging in the beginning of the video. :


She is now cantering on cue and she's getting more balanced and for the most part listening to my half halts and seat to come to a more controlled and slower canter. She is a very 'round' horse being a Perch x and majorly bouncy - a lot different that many of the other horses I"ve ridden in the past. She's my sweetheart though ...has a very nice temperament.

So if you review my video you'll see that her ears are back ...I wouldn't say 'pinned' but definitely not forward and happy looking. I do use a lot of voice while riding but it doesn't seem that she's doing it because she's listening to my voice ..she looks unhappy. :(

She's in great health , very fit , has had chiro work on her , she's barefoot and perfectly in balance and very healthy as well.

Please let me know your thoughts ...any critique /tips are very welcome as well. Just be tactful about it and constructive with any advice.

Thanks
     
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    10-23-2012, 10:17 PM
  #2
Foal
I think the source of her unhappiness is your riding (don't take offense...any horse's problems are always the rider ). You don't really move with her, when you were trying to post you were off rhythm and as a result, sitting too hard on her back. Your hands also bounce around and you don't have a steady connection with her mouth.

Jumping wise...you don't stay with her. You seem to anticipate the jump and lean forward too soon. Then you end by sitting back too soon and bounce around while trying to get your balance back. Your hands don't move with her mouth and you end up jerking her mouth. Practice a crest release before attempting automatic. I'm not a big fan of doing the crest release because I think it's more of a crutch, but in this case, with a green horse, you don't want to sour her from jumping because her mouth hurts everytime she does it.

You and share a common flaw- bent wrists. At 1:45 you can see your hands invert while trying to stop her. That means your reins are too long and/or your hands are too close together. You can also see your reins are way too long at 2:03, they're flapping around like crazy. Make sure to keep your wrists straight at all times. Easier said than done, I fight with mine all the time.

After the jump at 2:45, you brought her down to the trot, then asked for the canter and she was on the incorrect lead. Never let her do that or it will be a habit that is hard to break.

At 3:34 you jerked her hard in the mouth again. I noticed when you are trying to slow her down or stop, you look down which causes your whole body to collapse and then bounce around. Not a pretty or correct transition. Sit up tall, look forward, and relax your arms to allow for her head to naturally lower when she walks.

She's a cute horse and I think she'll do well with correct training. If I were you, I would forget jumping for now and take some serious dressage lessons. It will really help you get a feel for how to connect with your horse's mouth without being harsh or inconsistent, as well as how to properly use your body to cue her.

Good luck!
tinyliny likes this.
     
    10-23-2012, 10:23 PM
  #3
Showing
You are also too far back in the saddle and need to get over your legs. The horse is focused on your bouncing out of rhythm with her. You are sloppy in the saddle. You both need more w/t/c work without the jumps.
boots and MistysMom like this.
     
    10-23-2012, 10:32 PM
  #4
Green Broke
You're riding bitless, right? Bitless should be loose rein riding otherwise there is always nose pressure.
     
    10-23-2012, 10:34 PM
  #5
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcscott85    
I think the source of her unhappiness is your riding (don't take offense...any horse's problems are always the rider ). You don't really move with her, when you were trying to post you were off rhythm and as a result, sitting too hard on her back. Your hands also bounce around and you don't have a steady connection with her mouth.

Jumping wise...you don't stay with her. You seem to anticipate the jump and lean forward too soon. Then you end by sitting back too soon and bounce around while trying to get your balance back. Your hands don't move with her mouth and you end up jerking her mouth. Practice a crest release before attempting automatic. I'm not a big fan of doing the crest release because I think it's more of a crutch, but in this case, with a green horse, you don't want to sour her from jumping because her mouth hurts everytime she does it.

You and share a common flaw- bent wrists. At 1:45 you can see your hands invert while trying to stop her. That means your reins are too long and/or your hands are too close together. You can also see your reins are way too long at 2:03, they're flapping around like crazy. Make sure to keep your wrists straight at all times. Easier said than done, I fight with mine all the time.

After the jump at 2:45, you brought her down to the trot, then asked for the canter and she was on the incorrect lead. Never let her do that or it will be a habit that is hard to break.

At 3:34 you jerked her hard in the mouth again. I noticed when you are trying to slow her down or stop, you look down which causes your whole body to collapse and then bounce around. Not a pretty or correct transition. Sit up tall, look forward, and relax your arms to allow for her head to naturally lower when she walks.

She's a cute horse and I think she'll do well with correct training. If I were you, I would forget jumping for now and take some serious dressage lessons. It will really help you get a feel for how to connect with your horse's mouth without being harsh or inconsistent, as well as how to properly use your body to cue her.

Good luck!
Thank you guys. Kcscott85 I appreciate all the specific advice you gave me. This horse I purchased from in a 'rescue' situation and she's really come a long way since I bought her about a year ago. I know that my riding needs lots of tuning up. I've been out of riding for about 5 years so a forum like this really helps.

She's got a bitless bridle on right now and a treeless saddle. It seems so wide plus she's wide herself.

Would you have any ideas on flatwork sessions. Ie:patterns, times in each gait w/transitions ect... ?

Thanks again
Misty'sMom
     
    10-23-2012, 10:36 PM
  #6
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcscott85    
I think the source of her unhappiness is your riding (don't take offense...any horse's problems are always the rider ). You don't really move with her, when you were trying to post you were off rhythm and as a result, sitting too hard on her back. Your hands also bounce around and you don't have a steady connection with her mouth.

Jumping wise...you don't stay with her. You seem to anticipate the jump and lean forward too soon. Then you end by sitting back too soon and bounce around while trying to get your balance back. Your hands don't move with her mouth and you end up jerking her mouth. Practice a crest release before attempting automatic. I'm not a big fan of doing the crest release because I think it's more of a crutch, but in this case, with a green horse, you don't want to sour her from jumping because her mouth hurts everytime she does it.

You and share a common flaw- bent wrists. At 1:45 you can see your hands invert while trying to stop her. That means your reins are too long and/or your hands are too close together. You can also see your reins are way too long at 2:03, they're flapping around like crazy. Make sure to keep your wrists straight at all times. Easier said than done, I fight with mine all the time.

After the jump at 2:45, you brought her down to the trot, then asked for the canter and she was on the incorrect lead. Never let her do that or it will be a habit that is hard to break.

At 3:34 you jerked her hard in the mouth again. I noticed when you are trying to slow her down or stop, you look down which causes your whole body to collapse and then bounce around. Not a pretty or correct transition. Sit up tall, look forward, and relax your arms to allow for her head to naturally lower when she walks.

She's a cute horse and I think she'll do well with correct training. If I were you, I would forget jumping for now and take some serious dressage lessons. It will really help you get a feel for how to connect with your horse's mouth without being harsh or inconsistent, as well as how to properly use your body to cue her.

Good luck!
Thank you guys. Kcscott85 I appreciate all the specific advice you gave me. This horse I purchased from in a 'rescue' situation and she's really come a long way since I bought her about a year ago. I know that my riding needs lots of tuning up. I've been out of riding for about 5 years so a forum like this really helps.

She's got a bitless bridle on right now and a treeless saddle. It seems so wide plus she's wide herself.

Would you have any ideas on flatwork sessions. Ie:patterns, times in each gait w/transitions ect... ?

Thanks again
Misty'sMom
     
    10-23-2012, 10:37 PM
  #7
Green Broke
I agree with the above posts and may I suggest that while your saddle is a good size front to back, the saddle flap/panels are too long for you. Can you borrow a few others and try them?

The trees in saddles are there to provide stability and support. They help to distribute your weight most evenly. They are good things. That may be contributing to the way you move around on that horse.
MistysMom likes this.
     
    10-23-2012, 10:41 PM
  #8
Yearling
I agree her source of unhappiness is your riding. I would work on your posting and keeping a solid leg w/ quiet hands. You seem to be flopping all over her back instead of moving with her rhythm. I think you guys make a good team and look very well together!
MistysMom likes this.
     
    10-23-2012, 10:43 PM
  #9
Banned
Ok, very brave of you for posting a vid! I can hardly watch myself!!! Haha!

There was two things that really stood out to me:
1. Your feet are driven way home in your stirrups, I noticed you wriggling one out during the vid. Try to keep the ball of your foot in the stirrup....no more. Why? Because now that the ball of your foot is in the right place you can push that heel down, which in turn will seat you better. I could see during the vid that there were instances of your leg sitting well with that heel down. And at other times you were tipping forward because your foot was driven into the stirrup so your heel popped up and tipped you forward.....creating a balance issue.....
2. Balance. Your balance is a little on and off (stirrup heel issue fixed, will help immensely) I have been exactly where you are! The horse is green for sure. However I think you could really help her balance and your own balance out quite a bit by, slowing down. Everything looked too fast, loose and jarring. Slow every stride down and focus on developing some more softness and slowness. It will make everything so much easier for you to think about while riding.

I couldn't see your saddle position too clearly, but just check its not sitting too far forward.....

I think your mare is getting a little antsy because it's hard for her to do all your asking and maintain some balance....it's hard work for her.

Jogging slow circles and spiraling down to the middle and back out a again really helps with balance, for yourself and your horse.

All the best
Kayty and Foxhunter like this.
     
    10-23-2012, 10:44 PM
  #10
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by boots    
I agree with the above posts and may I suggest that while your saddle is a good size front to back, the saddle flap/panels are too long for you. Can you borrow a few others and try them?

The trees in saddles are there to provide stability and support. They help to distribute your weight most evenly. They are good things. That may be contributing to the way you move around on that horse.
Yes. This is what I'm thinking a lot of problem is. The saddle I have for her right now is a treeless. It seems wide but I've tried so many treed saddles for Misty and every one that I try really tends not to fit her properly. So, I thought getting a treeless would make her more comfortable. Unfortunately ,It put me farther back than I should be and the panels really doesn't provide very close contact to her sides. :(
boots likes this.
     

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