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Will your horse respond to your bit?

This is a discussion on Will your horse respond to your bit? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        09-19-2010, 03:20 AM
      #111
    Green Broke
    Maybe, instead of giving every beginning rider a snaffle and saying "good luck, you won't hurt them with this" we should just teach people to stay out of horses mouths to begin with? I mean, yes, we need to have contact with the reins, but we should rarely ever have to actually pull on the reins, know what I mean? We should treat the reins like threads that will break if we pull on them too hard.

    If you do that, you can ride in a curb or just about anything!

    I personally prefer a curb to a snaffle. But then I have always ridden older, already trained horses on trails. I find curbs give me finesse. I have even been known to ride in those evil Argentine snaffle/ tom thumb/ kimberwick types! I find most horses do great in them! Shocking but true.

    Just ride like your reins are made of thread, and you will have a soft horse and can ride in any bit. That will solve most bit-related problems I venture to guess.


         
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        09-19-2010, 07:20 AM
      #112
    Green Broke
    So true :) bits themselves are not evil...it's the way they are used if not used correctly...and a rider with heavy hands can misuse a bitless bridle just the same as someone else mentioned above already.
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        09-19-2010, 07:53 AM
      #113
    Green Broke
    You know, I have been passing this by because I didn't think it pertained to me. Boy was I wrong. I agree with all of it! Someone here recently asked about changing a bit for neck reining. I asked why do you need to rely on a bit for that.? It is all in the training from the begining. Give and take with softness. Pressure, release. And if you really don't know what your doing, get help. Everybody will make mistakes in their training, I have, but I also learned from watching trainers and finding a lot of info on the internet and books. I'm not perfect, but I do want the best care and training for my horses with the least possible problems later.
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        09-19-2010, 09:45 AM
      #114
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ruger    
    What about spurs?
    Spurs are an extension of your leg. Which if you read what I typed you would see I said leg. Like the bit if used properly they refine the cue given.
         
        09-19-2010, 09:46 AM
      #115
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by VelvetsAB    
    Where I come from, spurs are an EXTRA aid, but are not used for extra refinement.
    Where I come from they are used even more then a bit for refinement.
         
        09-19-2010, 03:54 PM
      #116
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    A bond has absolutely nothing to do with it, it's about refinement. You can't get that in a halter.
    I disagree completely. Refinement can be achieved in a halter or less.
         
        09-19-2010, 03:56 PM
      #117
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
    Maybe, instead of giving every beginning rider a snaffle and saying "good luck, you won't hurt them with this" we should just teach people to stay out of horses mouths to begin with? I mean, yes, we need to have contact with the reins, but we should rarely ever have to actually pull on the reins, know what I mean? We should treat the reins like threads that will break if we pull on them too hard.


    I agree with that. Sadly, a lot of people give someone a really strong bit and rather than "Good luck" say "Okay, just pull to stop." It can get ugly.
         
        09-19-2010, 05:33 PM
      #118
    Green Broke
    I'm not too fond of bitless for the same reason i'm not too fond of Parelli. It's the whole, "If you don't ______________(fill with Use Parelli methods, Ride bitless, etc) you are a horse abuser." I just read a bitless ad that said, "Bits cause pain, anxiety, and obstruct horses' breathing." Really? Just like yanking on a horse's sinus cavities will cause pain, anxiety, and obstruction of breathing. I just hate the my-way-or-the-highway mentality. If I had a horse who didn't work well with a bit, i'd consider bitless. But, personally, I have never worked with a horse who hated bits; just hated the hands that held the reins on the other end.
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        09-19-2010, 09:43 PM
      #119
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sunny    
    I'm not too fond of bitless for the same reason i'm not too fond of Parelli. It's the whole, "If you don't ______________(fill with Use Parelli methods, Ride bitless, etc) you are a horse abuser." I just read a bitless ad that said, "Bits cause pain, anxiety, and obstruct horses' breathing." Really? Just like yanking on a horse's sinus cavities will cause pain, anxiety, and obstruction of breathing. I just hate the my-way-or-the-highway mentality. If I had a horse who didn't work well with a bit, i'd consider bitless. But, personally, I have never worked with a horse who hated bits; just hated the hands that held the reins on the other end.
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    I find it to be more of "If you can do it that way, why can't you do it with less" rather than you're a horse abuser.
         
        09-19-2010, 11:03 PM
      #120
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BitlessForHappiness    
    I find it to be more of "If you can do it that way, why can't you do it with less" rather than you're a horse abuser.
    Less is relative. You think that less is less of a bit or no bit. I say less is less movement of my hand. Less contact on my horses b/c they can feel the movement of the bit with very little movement which refines the cue and makes it easier for them to understand what I want.
         

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