Will your horse respond to your bit? - Page 22
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Will your horse respond to your bit?

This is a discussion on Will your horse respond to your bit? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • What bit do i meed for my horse he get his tongue over the bit

Like Tree156Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-24-2010, 09:57 AM
  #211
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyRosie    
Horses feel face pressure in bridles with bits too. I have seen people like the youtube video nahreiner posted and I don't understand why bits are needed. I am honestly trying to understand and to gain more knowledge. If you are saying that a bit is to refine a cue how come you have to use it? Because you are already getting what you want without it right? I don't understand. Is it just so that you don't have to pull as hard or something? I am not being rude all I am trying to do is gain knowledge on the subject now. So my main question is if you are already getting the response you need why do you have to add something to refine a cue? I don't understand that.
Well it has been a bit but I am going to guess you are talking about the video of Stacy riding bareback and bridleless??

If so she did not start that horse that way. She started the horse in a bit (snaffle) and then to a curb bit and progressed to riding with just leg and seat and then dropped the bridle and went on until she gets to that point and not ever horse will get there no matter what.

Your horse might be responding to the cues you are giving him. However I will guarantee you that a reiner has a lot more cues and more refined cues then what your horse has. They are much more responsive to the cues given from the leg and seat. When I say refined I am talking moving your hand about an inch and the horse responding to you instantly. Not in a step or stride. I am talking the instant you pick up on the rein at any speed or gate. You get that type of refinement from a properly used bit and spur. Bit-less bridles do not give you the correct response from the rein to the horse to get that. The horse can not feel the slightest movement of your hand. The bit-less bridle is not made to give you that.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    10-24-2010, 10:02 AM
  #212
Green Broke
Yep, just means a quicker (and sometimes better) response from your horse, also means you don't have to use as much pressure as using a bitless bridle or halter.
     
    10-24-2010, 12:43 PM
  #213
Foal
Okay, but my sister doesn't ever use a bit and she can ride with no bridle and no saddle. So I guess I just have a different view on that. It's really interesting and good though to hear everybody else's opinions so thanks.
     
    10-24-2010, 12:50 PM
  #214
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyRosie    
Okay, but my sister doesn't ever use a bit and she can ride with no bridle and no saddle. So I guess I just have a different view on that. It's really interesting and good though to hear everybody else's opinions so thanks.
But at what level. I know several people who ride with out a saddle or a true bridle if one at all. They can get their horses to go and turn to a point and stop but non of them do it well and quickly like what you see with Stacy.

Keep in mind that what I consider a well trained broke horse is going to be very different then what most consider a well trained broke horse. It can come down to a simple a thing as how you define it.
     
    10-24-2010, 05:05 PM
  #215
Trained
Emily -

To show, you want everything you do to cue your horse to be almost invisible. On a well trained western horse, a flick of a pinkie finger can send them into a spin - This is because the curb bit magnifies a small signal on the rein to a larger signal in the mouth. So an invisible movement of the hand becomes a signal the horse can easily decipher and respond to in the mouth.

You can certainly do the same things in a halter or sidepull - But you can't do them with the flick of a finger. You need to open reins and move your whole hand. Do you see what I mean? The bit means the rider has to do less to acheive the same or better result.

That's all we mean by 'refining'.

*

Riding bitless is great of it works for you. Many horses are indeed happier that way. However performance horses generally DO need a bit. We need signals to be invisible, response to be immediate.

I plan on eventually riding my Arab mare bitless for endurance. It doesn't matter how big or messy my cues need to be out on the trail.

However when I show her or do any speed events, I will be using a bit, because then I need the more precise communication and refined cues.

Do you see what I mean?
     
    10-24-2010, 05:20 PM
  #216
Banned
I used to use a snaffle bit and my horse used to be so good with it till he realized he could pull through it and he was able to get his tongue over it and run away. Had his teeth checked out, had him evaluated by a trainer and he did it with the trainer to. The only thing to do was to change his bit. I use a pelham on him now.. and he does so much better. My horse is very head strong although now with the pelham he's learned to except the bit and relax.
     
    10-24-2010, 10:39 PM
  #217
Foal
Okay yes I understand what you all mean by refining now. I realize that for most shows a bit is necessary so I could definitely justify it in that kind of showing. I don't show anymore I haven't shown in a while so I don't know what the exact protocol is for tack. So I guess my question then is in shows that most of you do, do you get judged on how little your cue is?
     
    10-24-2010, 10:44 PM
  #218
Foal
I also just wanted to say that I apologize how I acted earlier. I was going through something stressful with one of our horses and instead of asking for opinions I kind of vented in my writing. A while ago we found out one of our horses has a cyst in his eye and cannot jump anymore. The vet recently came out and said it was slightly bigger so if it gets to a certain size it may cause some more serious conditions. He is blind from halfway down on one of his eyes now.
     
    10-24-2010, 10:47 PM
  #219
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmilyRosie    
Okay yes I understand what you all mean by refining now. I realize that for most shows a bit is necessary so I could definitely justify it in that kind of showing. I don't show anymore I haven't shown in a while so I don't know what the exact protocol is for tack. So I guess my question then is in shows that most of you do, do you get judged on how little your cue is?
The definition of reining is for a horse to be willingly guided with little to no visible cue. So the smaller the cue the better.
     
    10-24-2010, 10:49 PM
  #220
Foal
Okay, but is that the only show that you would use a bit in then? Sorry I should have phrased my question differently.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
horse will not respond to pressure horseshoes Horse Training 11 08-17-2010 09:29 AM
How to respond to a bolting horse Barry Godden Horse Articles 22 09-29-2009 03:32 PM
Horse Doesn't Respond to Downward Transitions on Longeline - Need Help! harryhoudini Horse Training 3 06-23-2009 04:59 PM
getting horse to respond to aids dreamrideredc Horse Training 6 06-08-2009 11:17 PM
How do I get my horse to respond to my leg? xilikeggs0 Horse Training 8 01-30-2009 07:03 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0