Will your horse respond to your bit? - Page 31 - The Horse Forum
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post #301 of 647 Old 12-21-2010, 07:54 PM
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Originally Posted by MN Tigerstripes View Post
So what if your horse throws her head, braces, pins her ears, just acts pissed off in general when you ride her bitless? Would you decide that she did not like the bitless? Or would you keep working in the bitless?

My mouth isn't nearly as bit as my horse's nor is it shaped correctly, but when I was child my siblings and cousins would often put "bits" in our mouths and ride each other. It wasn't uncomfortable in the slightest, unless the "rider" was yanking on it.

Obviously that doesn't work because it wasn't in a horse mouth. I believe bits are uncomfortable and don't agree with them. That won't change the mature thing is to agree to disagree.
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post #302 of 647 Old 12-21-2010, 08:03 PM
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Can you answer my first question please? I am genuinely curious as to what you would do if your horse showed the same discomfort signs being ridden bitless as you see when you ride her in a bit.

I have yet to have this question answered by a person that is diehard bitless. I do have several friends that ride primarily bitless. When I asked them the same question they said "Well, I'd find the option that works for the horse whether bitless or a bit. They'll tell you when they're comfortable."

I don't have a problem agreeing to disagree, but I do get tired of being told that I'm a terrible horse owner who doesn't understand or love her horses. Or that my horses must actually hate me because I put a bit in their mouth. I'm sure you can understand my frustration.

ETA - I said "bits" because we didn't use horse bits. They'd never fit . We generally used some sort of rope through our mouths or something of that nature.
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post #303 of 647 Old 12-21-2010, 08:10 PM
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Originally Posted by thumpthumpmyhorseshooves View Post
What type is your horse? Wind, Fire, ground? Do you have any idea what I am talking about? If you don't or if you do, but don't agree with it I feel sorry for you and your horse because you are missing out on something great..
What the...

No seriously, what is this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by thumpthumpmyhorseshooves View Post
My dream ride is bitless and bareback which is what I do most of the time.
I think bareback is more uncomfortable for horses than saddles on their backs. People usually ride bareback for one of three reasons. A: Because they are too lazy to be bothered with tack, B: To improve their balance and overall riding skill, and C: To "free" their horse, which is just silly. Think about it. Your butt bones grinding into their back with every step rather than a soft fleece pad. Saddles also help distribute your weight properly.

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Originally Posted by nrhareiner View Post
Even my stallions can and do go anyplace I wish to take them. They haul with mares they are in the same barn with mares. They are pastured next to mares with no problem. Again call a well trained animal.
I'm not sure if I would call that PURELY training. I'm sure your stallions are out-of-the-ordinary-sane at least partially because they aren't put on lockdown like a lot of stallions are, isolated and treated like they are sadistic rapists just waiting for the chance to have at it. They are allowed to interact with mares in a positive way, but on your terms. The best, most sane stallions I've seen are treated exactly like yours.
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post #304 of 647 Old 12-21-2010, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by RomanticLyric View Post
What the...

No seriously, what is this?



I think bareback is more uncomfortable for horses than saddles on their backs. People usually ride bareback for one of three reasons. A: Because they are too lazy to be bothered with tack, B: To improve their balance and overall riding skill, and C: To "free" their horse, which is just silly. Think about it. Your butt bones grinding into their back with every step rather than a soft fleece pad. Saddles also help distribute your weight properly.



I'm not sure if I would call that PURELY training. I'm sure your stallions are out-of-the-ordinary-sane at least partially because they aren't put on lockdown like a lot of stallions are, isolated and treated like they are sadistic rapists just waiting for the chance to have at it. They are allowed to interact with mares in a positive way, but on your terms. The best, most sane stallions I've seen are treated exactly like yours.
Google the fire wind ground and you'll get it it takes a long time to explain. I have had a horse chiropractor out to make sure my horses back is okay to be bareback and it is. If I am riding for more than two hours I use a saddle. Less than 2 bareback.
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post #305 of 647 Old 12-21-2010, 08:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RomanticLyric View Post
What the...

No seriously, what is this?



I think bareback is more uncomfortable for horses than saddles on their backs. People usually ride bareback for one of three reasons. A: Because they are too lazy to be bothered with tack, B: To improve their balance and overall riding skill, and C: To "free" their horse, which is just silly. Think about it. Your butt bones grinding into their back with every step rather than a soft fleece pad. Saddles also help distribute your weight properly.



I'm not sure if I would call that PURELY training. I'm sure your stallions are out-of-the-ordinary-sane at least partially because they aren't put on lockdown like a lot of stallions are, isolated and treated like they are sadistic rapists just waiting for the chance to have at it. They are allowed to interact with mares in a positive way, but on your terms. The best, most sane stallions I've seen are treated exactly like yours.

The wind fire ground is taught at the barn I ride at.
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post #306 of 647 Old 12-21-2010, 08:18 PM
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I'm sure it's "okay" to be ridden bareback, most horses' backs are. I wasn't arguing that it wasn't. I'm just pointing out that riding bareback is not what I would call an "ideal ride" for the horse, which seems to be what your number one concern is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thumpthumpmyhorseshooves View Post
The wind fire ground is taught at the barn I ride at.
I see. I googled it and couldn't find a thing. Maybe you could locate some literature on this for me?

Last edited by Romantic Lyric; 12-21-2010 at 08:21 PM.
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post #307 of 647 Old 12-21-2010, 08:18 PM
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Originally Posted by MN Tigerstripes View Post
Can you answer my first question please? I am genuinely curious as to what you would do if your horse showed the same discomfort signs being ridden bitless as you see when you ride her in a bit.

I have yet to have this question answered by a person that is diehard bitless. I do have several friends that ride primarily bitless. When I asked them the same question they said "Well, I'd find the option that works for the horse whether bitless or a bit. They'll tell you when they're comfortable."

I don't have a problem agreeing to disagree, but I do get tired of being told that I'm a terrible horse owner who doesn't understand or love her horses. Or that my horses must actually hate me because I put a bit in their mouth. I'm sure you can understand my frustration.

ETA - I said "bits" because we didn't use horse bits. They'd never fit . We generally used some sort of rope through our mouths or something of that nature.
If my horse started showing signs of irritation with a bitless bridle I would get the vet or chiropractor out to make sure she is okay. I have ridden at 3 different barns though and have never heard of a horse that can't be ridden bitless. I have never once said that if somebody uses a bit they don't love or care for their horse. I never said that and I was very careful not too so if somebody thinks that they have put that thought in their own mind.
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post #308 of 647 Old 12-21-2010, 08:22 PM
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Are we going thru this again?????????

Horses are scared of two things... Things that move and things that don't.
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post #309 of 647 Old 12-21-2010, 08:27 PM
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Originally Posted by RomanticLyric View Post
I'm sure it's "okay" to be ridden bareback, most horses' backs are. I wasn't arguing that it wasn't. I'm just pointing out that riding bareback is not what I would call an "ideal ride" for the horse, which seems to be what your number one concern is.



I see. I googled it and couldn't find a thing. Maybe you could locate some literature on this for me?

I understand what you mean about bareback, but to me for shorter rides I think that a horse would appreciate no tack rather than tack. When I go on long rides I use a barefoot treeless saddle.

It is taught here a bit : Spare

You can read about it a bit

Last edited by kitten_Val; 12-21-2010 at 09:28 PM.
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post #310 of 647 Old 12-21-2010, 08:30 PM
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And when the vet says the horse is okay, what do you do then?
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