Will your horse respond to your bit? - Page 49 - The Horse Forum

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post #481 of 647 Old 06-02-2011, 01:45 AM
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Originally Posted by LoganandMe View Post
Sorry you thought that I was being mean, but personally I feel like you were being mean to some of the smarter people on the forum. They accepted that you ride bit-less and you didn't accept that they ride with bits. I ride my horse bit-less, but I go to a camp where they use bits so I ride their horses in bits. That is their choice and I wouldn't attack them on that because they are knowledgeable people that have been riding longer than I have and I want to learn from them. I have read up on bits (I am still learning about them) and I ride bit-less, yes, but that doesn't mean that I will despise everybody who rides with bits and call them horse abusers.
Why did I even bother responding to a new person? You are obviously severely uneducated and as far as I'm concerned if you rode with a bit at your little camp then you are not a true bit-less rider. So W.E LoganandMe.
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post #482 of 647 Old 06-02-2011, 01:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Loveeemyhorseee View Post
Why did I even bother responding to a new person? You are obviously severely uneducated and as far as I'm concerned if you rode with a bit at your little camp then you are not a true bit-less rider. So W.E LoganandMe.
Oh okay, right, so because I'm polite and respect other peoples opinions I'm not a " true bit-less rider."
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post #483 of 647 Old 06-02-2011, 12:01 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by LoganandMe View Post
Hi, I'm new to this forum, but this is a topic that interests me specifically. I ride bitless, but I am wondering what the research is to back up the thought system that bits are good? I'm just trying to educate myself more on them.
Logan, welcome to the forum and you have no idea how much I appreciate you approaching this in a mature manner . My research on the matter of bits simply comes from a lifetime of riding horses and over a decade of training. I've handled lots of bits, though I just recently (within the last couple of years) began to really educate myself about pressure ratios and mouth conformation.

IMHO, bits are not good...nor are they bad, they are just a tool. It all depends on the hands on the other side of the reins. Some bits have more potential to be painful or damaging, but so long as the rider knows how to properly use them, then that risk is minimized.

The way I look at it, a snaffle bit is no different from a sidepull. They both have simple cues and the lowest possible pressure ratio, they just put the pressure on different parts of the horse. Mechanical hackamores (even though most folks use them incorrectly) are comparable to a standard curb bit.

You might consider reading these threads about bits, they talk about milder and harsher options and the different types and their uses.
Bit Information (Snaffle and English-Type Bits)
Bit Information (Curb and Western type bits and hackamores)

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #484 of 647 Old 06-02-2011, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Loveeemyhorseee View Post
Why did I even bother responding to a new person? You are obviously severely uneducated and as far as I'm concerned if you rode with a bit at your little camp then you are not a true bit-less rider. So W.E LoganandMe.

Ok her comes my MOD hat and I really really hate waring it as it gives me a headache.

Every person on this forum has their right to voice their opinion and participate in an EDUCATED DEBATE. That is what this is. There are some of us with well over a decade or more working with horses. Take the info or leave it that is up to you as a horse person. If you continue to call people un educated just b/c they do not have the same view as you do then your time here will be a hard one. Read learn and bring an educated debate of your side to the subject. Back it up with FACTS not just what you believe.

Ok now taking my Mod hat off.
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post #485 of 647 Old 06-02-2011, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by smrobs View Post
Logan, welcome to the forum and you have no idea how much I appreciate you approaching this in a mature manner . My research on the matter of bits simply comes from a lifetime of riding horses and over a decade of training. I've handled lots of bits, though I just recently (within the last couple of years) began to really educate myself about pressure ratios and mouth conformation.

IMHO, bits are not good...nor are they bad, they are just a tool. It all depends on the hands on the other side of the reins. Some bits have more potential to be painful or damaging, but so long as the rider knows how to properly use them, then that risk is minimized.

The way I look at it, a snaffle bit is no different from a sidepull. They both have simple cues and the lowest possible pressure ratio, they just put the pressure on different parts of the horse. Mechanical hackamores (even though most folks use them incorrectly) are comparable to a standard curb bit.

You might consider reading these threads about bits, they talk about milder and harsher options and the different types and their uses.
Bit Information (Snaffle and English-Type Bits)
Bit Information (Curb and Western type bits and hackamores)
Okay thanks I understand this a bit more now For instance though I have a little pony and she was ridden with a bit, but now I ride her bit-less and I don't have any problems with her at all. We don't show or anything we just ride at home and at lessons. Do you think that in that case I would still benefit from using a bit?
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post #486 of 647 Old 06-02-2011, 10:15 PM Thread Starter
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Anyone can benefit from using a bit and anyone can benefit from going bitless. If both of you are happy with your bitless, then I see no reason to change it.

One thing to think about though is if you ever need or decide to sell her, there are a lot of folks that will walk right on past a "bitless only" horse for sale. It's always nice to know that they will ride well in a bit even if you choose to ride bitless, that way, you can say that they ride both bitted and bitless.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #487 of 647 Old 07-12-2011, 05:22 PM
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Amen!! I feel the same about every single word written there.

I ride and show both English eq and western performance. Since my horse is over five, due to show rules he has to be shown in a curb. He is in a six inch shank dogbone futurity bit for western, and a simple single joint or french link snaffle for english.

He is equally light and responsive in all of them, with the slightest twitch of my finger. Why? Because this horse is trained by leg and seat, not yank, pull, bigger bit. He can be ridden bridless and behave the same as he does with a bit. He's been trained properly and lightly, IMO.

"You're just as sane as I am."~Luna Lovegood.

Last edited by DejaVu; 07-12-2011 at 05:28 PM.
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post #488 of 647 Old 07-13-2011, 08:35 PM
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I wish everybody thought that way!

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post #489 of 647 Old 07-17-2011, 03:13 PM
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I really like this post becaus I ride my QH in a full cheek snaffle but my trainer says he needs a Kimberwicke because we are working on his head set. I belive that any horse; Dressage, gamer, jumper ect. Should be able to be ridden in a simple D-ring snaffle. Now I have some other things to back up my opinion, Thanks!

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post #490 of 647 Old 08-14-2011, 09:16 PM
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I am training my mare in a straight, unjointed snaffle :) with an eggbutt. And I try to start off as soft as possible, I'm also using my seat and leg, which so actually seems to respond better to :)
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