Will your horse respond to your bit? - Page 56
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Will your horse respond to your bit?

This is a discussion on Will your horse respond to your bit? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Tongue withstands a lot of pressure
  • Relieving poll pressure from bitless bridle

Like Tree143Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-19-2012, 07:01 AM
  #551
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmergirl    
Also, have wondered if a bitless briddle would be too hard to learn to use and to train my horses to.
A bitless bridle is definitely not hard to use, or for your horse to learn to respond to. In fact, I swear by one. My horse gets wound up in a simple snaffle and keeps obsessively chewing it. Also we'd always get in arguments with very violent reactions from his side to the bit (bolting, his head shooting up and jumps to the side). Then I learned of groundwork, trust and respect.. We started with that and moved it up into riding bitless. We've moved from force and arguments to quiet communication, and with my bitless bridle (the Nurtural) we ride dressage, jumping, trail rides and even rides through the neighbourhood, over roads and biking paths, all on our own. This on a horse that only used to run through the ring and didn't even want to put one step out of the barn terrain without turning on his haunches and bolting back. Seeing as you're not a competitive rider, a bitless bridle would be perfect for you. You've had your horse for ages, you know him well enough to be able to train him to respond to anything, and once your horse trusts you, he doesn't need 'brakes' on a bridle, the brakes are your body movements and voice assuring him there's no need to run. There's plenty to try - a rope halter is possibly the easiest as you can just buy some rope and make one yourself. When training, always start something new in a closed ring in case your horse gets confused and doesn't know what you're asking. Quietly and gently repeat your commands until you get the desired effect and reward the horse. Training in a bitless bridle is nothing different from training in a bit, it's still training.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-21-2012, 06:10 AM
  #552
Weanling
I definitely agree that training and connecting with your horse in different ways doesn't have anything to do with a bit. If the bit has to be that harsh then they aren't taking the time to do the right training. Thankyou for the post as I just purchased a green horse and was wondering about a bit. I just have a regular snaffle and thought I'd have to purchase a different one.
     
    05-21-2012, 09:54 AM
  #553
Foal
I tried riding my horse just with his halter, He did pretty good but once I did have a little trouble getting him to stop. He didn't try to run off but did keep walking when asked to stop. With a bitless bridle will I have a little more control over stopping? Otherwise he did great.
     
    05-21-2012, 10:02 AM
  #554
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmergirl    
I tried riding my horse just with his halter, He did pretty good but once I did have a little trouble getting him to stop. He didn't try to run off but did keep walking when asked to stop. With a bitless bridle will I have a little more control over stopping? Otherwise he did great.
It depends on which kind of bitless bridle, some versions have pretty much the same way of working as a halter (pressure on the nose). Also some training to respond well to pressure on the nose will work through that issue, I think. Something else to consider is how were you asking your horse to stop? Did you 'make yourself heavy' as I was taught in riding schools? Most people when doing that will rotate their pelvis back (moving your hips and lower back towards the horse's back) which will actually push the horse forward, while you want him to stop. Try to teach your horse by saying 'whoa' the same time you put pressure on the reins, lighten your seat instead (slightly leaning forward is okay, as with that action you will be 'blocking' your horse's movements) and most importantly, stop moving with him. You know the feeling of how your horse is carrying you first one side, then the other side, like a ship on a wave, and you're automatically following this motion. If you're aware of it, you can stop following it, which in a responsive horse will immediately get the message of 'stop' accross, without the need of a bridle.
     
    05-21-2012, 01:35 PM
  #555
Foal
Thanks for all the info. I do just what you thought I might have, I sit back and slightly preess my weight down. I do usually say whoa when asking him to stop. I can't wait to try your suggestions. It makes sense with your explanation. Thanks!
     
    05-21-2012, 04:22 PM
  #556
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmergirl    
Thanks for all the info. I do just what you thought I might have, I sit back and slightly preess my weight down. I do usually say whoa when asking him to stop. I can't wait to try your suggestions. It makes sense with your explanation. Thanks!
You're welcome, hope it helps! Once I figured this out with my horse, it made a world of difference in slowing and stopping him (especially bridleless). The only not so nice thing, or maybe at the other hand it is, is that if I lose balance forward, he'll also stop. But hey, at least that means he won't drop me by accident.
     
    05-21-2012, 07:34 PM
  #557
Foal
That sounds like a good thing to me!!
     
    05-23-2012, 03:26 PM
  #558
Foal
bitless

Hi

Not only am I looking (in the far off distant future) to get back into riding, I do not agree with bits all the time, want to ride saddle and bareback, and wonder whether you have any tips for me?

We English seem a bit stuck in a conservative rut with all these things..

All tips, contacts etc much appreciates

I look forward to hearing from you

Kind regards

Selene
     
    05-24-2012, 05:45 AM
  #559
Weanling
Wow how amazing to find this thread still running after nearly 2 years absence from this forum! I of course have not read the entire 56 pages of the thread lol, but thought you all might be interested to read a bit of research I came across on another forum a few days ago regarding the bitless vs bitted debate :)


Researcher Evaluates Bit, Rein Interaction with Equine Mouth by:
Christa Lesté-Lasserre April 13 2012,

Having a better understanding about the mechanics of riders' hands' interactions with the horse's head can improve your horse's performance, comfort, and well-being, noted one researcher at a recent equitation science conference. Hilary M. Clayton, BVMS, PhD, Dipl. ACVSMR, MRCVS, Mary Anne McPhail Dressage Chair in Equine Sports Medicine at Michigan State University, explained that bits, nosebands, and headpieces all exert pressure on horses when we place pressure on the reins, which can vary considerably.

But new biomechanical findings in equitation science can help riders make more informed decisions about equipment use and also dispel certain myths about bridles, bits, and reins.

According to Clayton, soft tissues such as the tongue, for example, are better suited to handling pressure than hard tissues like the nose bone and the palate (the roof of the horse's mouth). "The horse's tongue can be very sensitive but it can also withstand a lot of different kinds of pressure," she said during her plenary lecture at the 2011 International Society for Equitation Science Conference, held Oct. 26-29 in Hooge Mierde, The Netherlands.

"From my point of view, I would be a lot more concerned about pressure directly on the hard tissues (and) the bones, rather than the soft tissues which have a lot more ability to absorb the forces," she said.
Radiograph of Bitted Horse

Using radiographs (X rays) and fluoroscopy (real-time radiography) of a horse's head while wearing a bridle and bit, Clayton evaluated the position of the bit in a horse's mouth with and without tension applied to the reins.

Using radiographs (X rays) and fluoroscopy (real-time radiography) of a horse's head while wearing a bridle and bit, Clayton evaluated the position of the bit in a horse's mouth with and without tension applied to the reins. When the bit was the appropriate size for the horse and adjusted correctly, she said, the tongue could slide up and down under the mouth piece.

"Relaxation of the tongue allowed the bit to sink into the tongue when tension was applied to the reins," Clayton said. "But if the center joint of a single-jointed bit (like a basic snaffle) poked forward into the hard palate, this appeared to be uncomfortable for the horse." This so-called "nutcracker action" could cause the horse to react by leaning into the bit or opening his mouth, Clayton continued.

"I think that some of the resistances that we see in different bits are actually the horse's way of trying to relieve pressure on the palate," she said. Essentially Clayton suggested that riders should try to avoid putting pressure on the hard tissues (like the palate and the jaw bones) and keep the pressure primarily on the tongue.

Early studies on one type of bitless bridle, on the other hand, showed that the pressure on the nose, under the chin, and on the poll is quite high, Clayton added. Although this research is still in its early stages, Clayton said she isn't convinced the bitless bridle is more humane.

"Some people are under the impression that if you take the bit out of the horse's mouth, then you solve a lot of problems--that the bit is a source of pain," she said. "I would caution you that taking the bit away and simply putting pressure on the horse's nose may not be a cure-all."

Even so, the bitless bridle might be a "useful alternative" for horses that are unable to wear a bit, such as those with a lacerated tongue, she said.
     
    05-24-2012, 07:16 AM
  #560
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by boxer    
According to Clayton, soft tissues such as the tongue, for example, are better suited to handling pressure than hard tissues like the nose bone and the palate (the roof of the horse's mouth). "The horse's tongue can be very sensitive but it can also withstand a lot of different kinds of pressure,"

"Some people are under the impression that if you take the bit out of the horse's mouth, then you solve a lot of problems--that the bit is a source of pain," she said. "I would caution you that taking the bit away and simply putting pressure on the horse's nose may not be a cure-all."

Even so, the bitless bridle might be a "useful alternative" for horses that are unable to wear a bit, such as those with a lacerated tongue, she said.
Yeah I read that somewhere too, which makes sense.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
horse will not respond to pressure horseshoes Horse Training 11 08-17-2010 09:29 AM
How to respond to a bolting horse Barry Godden Horse Articles 22 09-29-2009 03:32 PM
Horse Doesn't Respond to Downward Transitions on Longeline - Need Help! harryhoudini Horse Training 3 06-23-2009 04:59 PM
getting horse to respond to aids dreamrideredc Horse Training 6 06-08-2009 11:17 PM
How do I get my horse to respond to my leg? xilikeggs0 Horse Training 8 01-30-2009 07:03 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:07 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0