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Won't respond lunging counter clockwise

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        04-09-2013, 08:12 AM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Laffeetaffee please stop dispensing advice that is blatently wrong, the greeks lunged horses, the classical dressage lot were lunging horses in the 17th century, lunging is not new! It is also NOT joinup with a line.

    Lunging is used to teach the horse to walk trot and canter on a cue, it can be used to supple a horse up, improve a horses way of going, improve fitness, improve muscles, improve strength, improve balance and to exercise the horse without riding. Lunging should never realy go on beyond 30mins (except in cirtain circumstances) nor should it be done excessivly for young horses as it puts massive pressure on the joints.

    Having them turn in every time you stop is quite frankly dangerous perticularly when you come to longrein a horse (which IMO is essential when breaking a horse) or when you have a panicing horse on the end of the line. I for one would not want a panicing horse going over the top of me!
         
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        04-09-2013, 08:25 AM
      #12
    Started
    Where in heavens name is Laffeetaffee coming up with these things?!

    Lunging has been around forever. It is an excellent tool to have when working on conditioning, balance and fine tuning some things. Having a horse turn in is not only annoying, but dangerous. The only time I want a horse to turn in is when I am asking it to change directions on the lunge. Even that I don't do until the horse is fully trained because it can be a mess with youngsters.
         
        04-09-2013, 09:34 AM
      #13
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
    I respectfully disagree.
    Right on. (me too)
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        04-09-2013, 09:43 AM
      #14
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faye    

    Having them turn in every time you stop is quite frankly dangerous perticularly when you come to longrein a horse (which IMO is essential when breaking a horse) or when you have a panicing horse on the end of the line. I for one would not want a panicing horse going over the top of me!
    I agree. Even the best trained horse can startle when snow falls off the roof or a foolish kid comes flying around a corner on their mini bike.

    A former trainer used to believe the horse had to face you to respect you. Until she was working a horse and a passing truck hit his air brakes. Broken ribs, broken wrist and concussion later - she changed her mind.
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        04-09-2013, 11:31 AM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    I agree. Even the best trained horse can startle when snow falls off the roof or a foolish kid comes flying around a corner on their mini bike.

    A former trainer used to believe the horse had to face you to respect you. Until she was working a horse and a passing truck hit his air brakes. Broken ribs, broken wrist and concussion later - she changed her mind.
    she was lucky, My mum fractured her neck in 2 places and got a lot of dead muscles in her legs from a paniced horse going over the top of her.
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        04-09-2013, 11:34 AM
      #16
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faye    
    she was lucky, My mum fractured her neck in 2 places and got a lot of dead muscles in her legs from a paniced horse going over the top of her.
    OMG! I can't even begin to imagine how scary and painful that was.
         
        04-09-2013, 11:39 AM
      #17
    Green Broke
    Yep, Its also the reasoon you never lead a horse from directly in front of it, it would have been so much worse if she had no warning and it went over her back!
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        04-09-2013, 11:42 AM
      #18
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faye    
    Yep, Its also the reasoon you never lead a horse from directly in front of it, it would have been so much worse if she had no warning and it went over her back!
    I can't agree with this enough. It is one of the first things I preach to my students when they first start.
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        04-10-2013, 01:49 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faye    
    Yep, Its also the reasoon you never lead a horse from directly in front of it, it would have been so much worse if she had no warning and it went over her back!

    Thank you for pointing this out, as this is another piece of advice that is being handed out by LaffeeTaffee right and left.

    Leading a horse from in front of it, is both foolish and dangerous with certain breeds especially. That is why you never see Thoroughbreds or Saddlebreds led like that, or any hot blooded horse. If something panics them, or even catches their attention? They will be on top of you in a GA heartbeat. You lead at their throatlatch so you don't end up leading the funeral procession.

    While I have gotten in more of habit of leading at long range with the QH at barn INSIDE the barn? I never do it outside.

    In the first place, these are not my horses, but WP horses in training, of various ages. I am responsible for them when I have them in hand. I do not take any chances with them ever.

    And at Saddlebred barn? If I had lead any from in front? Would have been dismissed. Those Saddlebred trainers don't put up with such.

    And at Thoroughbred farm? You would have been wearing a horse if you led from in front. Nothing like a hot TB to make you take notice, add to that the fact that if ONE spooks? They all spook, no matter where they are...instant racetrack.

    I also keep one finger extended along lead rope towards horse's jaw, so that if horse swings head towards me, or acts like it wants to get frisky, I can either lightly jab with fingernail, or make a knuckle with forefinger and bump with it to let horse know I'm watching it.

    And as for the "wiggling line" advice to get horse to back? Also wrong. I call this WWJJWHACK! All it does is make something simple aggravating for the horse and anyone watching. For the life of me I cannot figure out why anyone came up with this.

    Actually had fool argue with me about teaching backing...she said you NEVER touch a horse to get it to back...just WWJJWHACK!! She wants a horse to move when she picks up the lead.

    Told her that would work really well with my Showmanship customers and Horsemanship customers horses....and could not WAIT to see trainer's face when I was pulling horse out of stall to WWJJWHACK!

    My way works, takes no equipment of any kind and does not result in horse flipping head up to get away from the nutcase on the other end of lead.
    NBEventer likes this.
         
        04-11-2013, 09:03 AM
      #20
    Foal
    Most of the time it's just trotting but occasionally when I have her canter as well.
         

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