won't stand tied.
   

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won't stand tied.

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  • Throighbred wont stand still
  • Horse wont stand tied to post

 
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    07-04-2007, 03:55 PM
  #1
Foal
won't stand tied.

Thoroughbreds are evil. Just evil. Well, not really.

I can’t get Charlie to stand still and relax while he’s tied. Now I don’t mind if he moves a little bit but he’s all over the place. I know its because he’s just a busy kind of guy, but its hard to keep him entertained and groom him at the same time. And one of these days I would just love to be able to bath him and apply his hoof moisturizer without needing someone else to hold him.

I was thinking I could get one of those stall licks that roll or whatever and put it on my hitching post. Would this be okay, (I’m sure its cheating) or do you think it would teach him bad habits? I figure it help him as he’ll have something to keep his scattery brain occupied.

Another part of the problem as that he gets himself so worked up he starts to spook at everything, and I still haven’t gained enough confidence to be completely cool while he freaks out, which only makes him more nervous, and any of the times I‘ve tried to chastise him for bad behaviour, like a hard hank on the lead he just gets freaked.. Seriously, when he gets real spastic it terrifies me and all I want to do is go back in the house. (its been years since I’ve been around horses).

I really want to be able to spend alone time with my horse where we can bond without someone giving instructions, or without anyone else around to take away from our time.
     
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    07-04-2007, 05:51 PM
  #2
Yearling
I don't know if this will help, but this is what I did with Rose. I cross-tied her on the bathing pad and let her stand for a while, 30 mins or so, a few times just to let her learn some patience and see how she would tie. Don't leave him unattened for a while, stay with him until you see how he will react, then slowly start to move further away. Then I started tying her to the stall and grooming her, and everytime she moves around, I gently but firmly put her back in the same spot. If she shifts her weight or moves a little bit that's fine, but if she starts to move all over the place and won't stand still, I put her right back and now she stands very well. I don't know if this will help or not, but it's working for me, and the horse trainer that we use was the one who told me to put them back in the same spot and it worked VERY well for him, he was able to groom his horses without tying them at all. Hope this helps and wasn't confusing!!
     
    07-04-2007, 08:11 PM
  #3
Foal
No, that wasn't confusing at all. I'll try that, though I don't have a cross-tie/wash station. Though I want to put one in. But I'll that returning him to his original spot thing. He really does need to learn to be more patient.

Oh, and thanks for the advice!
     
    07-04-2007, 08:18 PM
  #4
Foal
Cross-ties are a godsend in this type of situation. Really. I don't know how quickly you could get some, but I would put that on the top of the list. They're wonderful

As for the patience thing, once you have cross-ties, definitely try the leaving him there for lengthy periods (30 min) without really working with him, but more, sitting near him. Try working around the barn while he's there, so he gets that you're there - but not really. Then maybe he'll be more interested in watching you, than being freaked out.

With age, hopefully the spookyness will go away, and with just general experience. As for you're confidence, don't be afraid to get mad at him. Really, you need to be the top-dog for both your and his safety. A harsh yank on the shank, or a firm smack on the neck (this isn't abuse when done constructively) might just knock some sense into him! I've seen horses, typically OTTB skitter all over their owners, who just get more and more nervous. One quick smack on the neck, and they'll be more focused on "What the HECK was that!!!" instead of dancing around. And eventually, they'll chill.

Once you get him so that he can stand somewhat, really get to know every inch of him. It sounds weird, but touching them all over is the best way to make them super comfortable. Inside the ears, inbetween the hind legs - yes, its sounds bizarre, but its the strongest kind of bond = touch. The better you know them all over, the better the whole situation will be - at least that's what I tend to see. ;)

Best of luck! :)
     
    07-04-2007, 08:39 PM
  #5
Foal
It will take a little bit to get crossties in. Means I have to dig another hole in this evil rocky ground, but I can do it. Or convince the old man to get the tractor out.

Now, I'm not afraid to get mad at him, and I have given him a wack or too when he'd being just too much, and that seems to really send him over the edge. And we usually know that I'm lead and he's so not, but there are just some situations I've never been comfortable with for some reason. And you would think my being older would fix this, since I'm no longer itty bitty. I'm hoping that more time around horses will help this.

Thanks so much for your advice, both of you. I'll get on that crosstie thing ASAP. Luckily I already have another ring, and another post. And getting the clips is just a trip to the feed store.
     
    07-04-2007, 10:10 PM
  #6
Foal
Cross-ties can be bad I have seen to many horses get hurt because of cross-ties.
I see you use a rope halter that is great there is nothing better to use but in your one pic it is to lose tighten it up some. Then tie him up with only 4" of rope to the post and then walk away this is how I train all my babys I keep an eye on them but if they sit down and start pulling I just leave them that is the only way they learn how to tie. Sometimes I leave them there for 30Mins sometime almost all day but I never untie them until they stand there and be good.
     
    07-04-2007, 10:28 PM
  #7
Foal
Oh, I know it's too loose. It's usually tighter than that, but I don't know if it came loose, or was tied that way for whatever reason (maybe because we were going back into the pen/pasture/something). I actually used to *hate* rope halters, mainly because I was used to the thick nylon ones that made me feel more in control, now I'm used to them and like them a lot.

Well, I'll try both, just tying and then crossties. I can't, however, put him on a shorter lead, because the lead rope it attached to the halter. And I usually panic tie, just incase he has a meltdown or decides to throw himself over backwards. My friend had a mare who was really bad about being tied, if it didn't give, she flipped, so I figure, since we still don't know each other that well, and things could happen, its panic tie all the way.

Plus I had the rope halter come off once when the lead didn't give. Not this halter, a different one, his lead got snagged on his hoof. So I want some give to he doesn't end up completely loose with nothing to grab onto.

Again, thanks for the advice. I'm willing to try anything once until something works.
     
    07-04-2007, 10:48 PM
  #8
Foal
Well, I'll try both, just tying and then crossties. I can't, however, put him on a shorter lead, because the lead rope it attached to the halter. And I usually panic tie, just incase he has a meltdown or decides to throw himself over backwards. My friend had a mare who was really bad about being tied, if it didn't give, she flipped, so I figure, since we still don't know each other that well, and things could happen, its panic tie all the way.


Tie it shorter, and don't panic tie, tie it good so it dose not come untied, if he throws himself backwards that's ok that is how he learns if he has a meltdown and you untie him what did you train him to do?

My friend had a mare who was really bad about being tied, if it didn't give, she flipped, (if it didn't give) she trained her to not tie

So I figure, since we still don't know each other that well, and things could happen

I will take a horse that I just took off the trailer and tie it to a hitching post and if it goes to throw himself over backwards that's ok that is the only way he can learn is to try to get out and when he can't he stops pulling.

Plus I had the rope halter come off once when the lead didn't give

The halter came off because it was to lose it should be under his chin, and rope halters are not suppose to give that's how come we use them.

I actually used to *hate* rope halters, mainly because I was used to the thick nylon ones that made me feel more in control, now I'm used to them and like them a lot

You have less control with the thick ones because they don't hurt when you jerk on them.

I have trained 100s of horses to tie this way, if you untie it every time he has meltdown, throws himself over backwards or even daces it will get worst
     
    07-05-2007, 01:13 AM
  #9
Started
Cross ties can be very dangerus if a horse is left unattended or spooked, I once boarded at a barn who banned the use of them after loosing 3 horses to cross tie in one year, when I boarded some of the boarders would take half towels and slip them over the nose band of the halters so the horse would have some thing to play with, it took abby some time to learn that she had to stay still while tied.
     
    07-05-2007, 10:37 AM
  #10
Foal
In all my years of riding, and after the tons of barns I've been too, I've NEVER seen a horse die/get seriously injured from cross-ties. When used properly, and set at a good length, there is very little a horse can do to really get themselves in a mess.

However, I've never used outdoor crossties, like with a hitching post and such. I've always been on an aisle which is a bit more contained.
     

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