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Wont stop

This is a discussion on Wont stop within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        03-15-2007, 05:26 PM
      #11
    Foal
    There are lots of bits that can be soft in the right hands. I've used plenty of tom thumbs, gags, and such (not that approve, haha only from a parelli person would you hear this) but when it comes to running away your not going to lightly ask them to stop. Dutch gags have 3 rings which makes them usable as a snaffle or gag. I'm just not sure if a gag would really work. I mean he could still take off if he really wanted too. I get what your saying, and your right I wouldn't move to the canter until trot is great!
         
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        03-17-2007, 10:20 AM
      #12
    Foal
    When he wants to run let him run till he wants to stop. Then run him some more. A few sessions like this and he won't want to take off. Congradulations on saveing another killer bound animal.
         
        03-17-2007, 08:34 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Ok don't worry, I know exactly how you feel. I rode a cute little pony at my old barn, and he did the same thing, imo its a pony thing (no affense) alot of poines I have ridden have done that. But what really help me, is, when he starts to canter or bolt use all your strenght and turn him in tight, tight circles and just wear him out ( it sounds ruff, but believe me it works) just let him go in that small circle until you feel he is slowing down. Now when he does, reward him but voice and give him some rein, and sit quietly in the saddle, and if he speeds back up after you give him rein, don't panic, just take up the rein again and circle him some more until he calms down. Im not saying it will work within days, it does take time, but do this everytime you ride. Eventually he will understandyour command. But don't forget to praise, but giving him rein if he listens, but don't right away go rite back out on the rail if he is calm, after you gave him rein, keep him in the circle, just make it bigger, if he then goes faster take the circle back in smaller and take up rein. Trust me it works, it takes time but works.

    Good Luck!
    -chelsea-
         
        03-20-2007, 07:11 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Hi,

    I agree, sometimes you do need brakes (my horse can be strong, when I 1st got back in the saddle after breaking 4 ribs I had him in a dutch gag. Using the snaffle ring on the main reign and the 2nd or 3rd ring on the gag reign - only lightly incase I needed the brakes - breaking 4 ribs REALLY weakens you!) I only had him in the gag for 3 months untill I felt stronger with him again and then went back to his everyday snaffle.

    Although in this case I think its more of a control issue than a strength one.

    When you're riding keep your hands up - I know it is very easy to do but don't get too comfortable and drop your hands - if you do this and he bolts he can get his head straight up and you don't have a chance of regaining control quickly!
    Keep your legs on at all times, let him know your there.
    If he does take off don't fight to regain control, I generally do 1 of 2 things-
    1. Half holt (gently) use your wrists not your arms if you can, this will make him listen and give you time to regain control
    2. If it is safe to let him go, sit deep then push him on. If my horse does this I ride him through it. When he starts to stop, I push him on. Show him if he's going to try to run off then he can run off till YOU say when to stop - again you regaining control.

    Hope this helps
    :)
         
        03-21-2007, 02:10 AM
      #15
    Foal
    Hi,

    It is known that when a horse bolts or won't listen to your signals to stop, he is running away from the bit, it hurts to get pulled, and this is the only way a horse can tell you, so he takes off....

    But don't worry there are solutions to this, other than putting harsher bits on them.

    We start at the begining, Does the horse respect your space, is he pushy, unrespectful are you in control on the ground or is he. If not gain control, find someone who knows about horses, get them to re-educate the horse, and teach you how to do it...most of all listen to them.

    Lunging may help, walking first if he is ok with that, then continue in the trot and so on. If you don't have control in one of these gaits then go back to the one you have control of, keep repeating this until you have respect on the ground or you will get hurt.......... then with a sirsingle use side reins, tighten as you need to, this gives the horse a chance to have the bit in his mouth without being tugged all the time, may help to get a softer mouth in the end.

    There is so much more, that is why I suggest you find someone local.

    If I can help any more please leave me a message.
         
        03-21-2007, 02:10 AM
      #16
    Foal
    Hi,

    It is known that when a horse bolts or won't listen to your signals to stop, he is running away from the bit, it hurts to get pulled, and this is the only way a horse can tell you, so he takes off....

    But don't worry there are solutions to this, other than putting harsher bits on them.

    We start at the begining, Does the horse respect your space, is he pushy, unrespectful are you in control on the ground or is he. If not gain control, find someone who knows about horses, get them to re-educate the horse, and teach you how to do it...most of all listen to them.

    Lunging may help, walking first if he is ok with that, then continue in the trot and so on. If you don't have control in one of these gaits then go back to the one you have control of, keep repeating this until you have respect on the ground or you will get hurt.......... then with a sirsingle use side reins, tighten as you need to, this gives the horse a chance to have the bit in his mouth without being tugged all the time, may help to get a softer mouth in the end.

    There is so much more, that is why I suggest you find someone local.

    If I can help any more please leave me a message.
         
        03-26-2007, 04:34 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Thanks for all the replies, they've been very helpful.
    I do wish I could just let him run and get it out of his system but gallops round here aren't very long and end in a sharp turn, a dyke or a road so one out of control pony is not a good idea. I'd probably end up flying, very wet or squashed!!!!
    One thing I have tried over the last few days is 'time out'. I used to do it years ago with a stallion I rode when he got overexcited. When Max stops listening and tries to do his own thing we turn around to face the other way and stand still. Once he's standing quietly I ask him to turn back to face the original direction and walk on quietly. I really think he's starting to get the hang of it. He's been loads better today. Haven't allowed him to canter fast or for very far but he did stop when asked. Fingers crossed anyway. Still love him to bits and wouldn't change him for the world!
         
        03-26-2007, 04:43 PM
      #18
    Foal
    In answer to the last reply, he was very pushy when I had him, very headstrong but very nervous of being touched.
    Now he walks on a loose rein beside me and at the speed I want to walk. When I wasn't well, and needed to stop on the way to the field he'd just stand quietly and wait to be told to carry on. He gives way in the stable and when grooming etc. now, feet waving in the air for picking out, and I can play the tomtoms all over his body without a flinch. Still working on his head, very head shy except for headcollars and bridle. Brushing mud off his face is a nightmare and a typical boy (dirty ears).
         
        03-27-2007, 09:12 AM
      #19
    Foal
    I've actually heard several trainers recommend what Desert Rat said. Let them run, and then run them some more when they want to stop. Eventually they will get the message!

    Of course, if its not safe, (i.e. Running all over the place, and not straight), then I wouldn't do it.

    Not sure if i'm fearless enough to do it though.......
         
        03-27-2007, 10:13 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    Hi! This is an awful situation that you find yourself in.....i know becuz both my mare (16hh tb x dutch) and my old boy (welsh x section d= very strong) both USED TO do this bolting behaviour. The more you try and stop the worse they get, and my mare even resorted to falling over when I attempted the tighter and tighter circle method (especially as she appears to be able to bolt on a 5m circle) I simply couldnt go smaller and so she flung herself to the ground, I came off and then she proceeded to run around in the menage finding it all very funny!

    The best thing honestly (and it really does work. Causing barely any stress on yourself or the horse) is to let it bolt!!!

    I know this sounds crazy!!! But listen..... when the pony/horse bolts sit up give it abit of rein and let it go, when in gets tired of bolting (which it will-especially when your not making a fuss about it doing so) and wants to stop don't LET IT!!! Aks again for canter, and when it wants to stop again don't LET IT!!! Do this repeatedly unitl the pony/horse would rather do what you want it too than bolt and then praise it.

    YOU WILL NEVER HAVE A PROBLEM WITH BOLTING AGAIN! I have had my old boy 9 yrs and he hasnt done it since the first week I had him and he tried it in an open field. I have had my mare 2yrs and she hadnt attemped it again either. In fact instead of arsing about when in a field she will walk (even collected) trot and canter on the spot if I want her to. She will have a flat out gallop for as many strides as I want her to and go bact to walking on a long rein (even if the company proceeds to bog off!)

    It works-trust me!
         

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