Work horse out bareback
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Work horse out bareback

This is a discussion on Work horse out bareback within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Cooling your horse out bareback
  • Work horse bare back

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-13-2008, 11:13 AM
  #1
Showing
Work horse out bareback

Does anyone do it? I mean working sometime horse bareback like you do with saddle on (may be not the whole hour, but 30-40 mins). I know that saddle distributes the weight better, so... Can riding bareback damage the horse's back?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-13-2008, 01:13 PM
  #2
Weanling
I really don't think bareback is going to damage your horses back unless you are really bouncing around up there on their spine. I would htink if you bounce that much you'd not really "work" your horse much that way anyways, because you'd likely fall off. LOL

Your horse might like bareback better. It's less weight, no tight cinch and it's cooler on their backs. Also, soft human thighs are a bit more forgiving than a rigid saddle tree that doesn't fit quite right. Your legs will provide a custom fit to your horses' back. Now, his WITHERS might not be so forgiving for you. LOL

And being bare, you can communicate with less cueing than with a saddle between you, and that can work either way for you. A sensitive horse may find it too stimulating, but a less responsive horse may respond better. Just remember to keep a natural seat and not "clamp" on with your legs to hang on, and definitely don't use the reins for balance!!!!

The muscles are used a little differently since the weight is in a different distribution, but muscles can easily adapt to it. If you rode bareback all the time, they would get used to it pretty quick, just like you would.

If you don't mind sweaty pants, and your horse isn't overly sensitive to it (some will twitch their skin like you're a fly at first LOL) go for it. You will find your balance will improve immensly, esp if you have a horse with a narrow barrel. The thick horses are easier to ride bareback in faster gaits.

It's a lot of fun and a nice change for your workouts for you and your horse.
     
    06-13-2008, 01:20 PM
  #3
Showing
Thanks a lot, barefoothooves! Just curious, will it be the problem for horse to switch back to the saddle again you think?
     
    06-13-2008, 01:31 PM
  #4
Weanling
Oh, if you don't ride bareback exclusively, I don't see it being a big deal. And even if you did omit the saddle for a while, if your horse is broke, it shouldn't be a problem. Maybe that first time back under saddle, longe him before you mount up in case he decides to be silly about it.

I used to do a lot of hard riding under saddle (training and such) then pull the saddle off and cool them out bareback. It was a way of introducing the no saddle thing when they least felt like being silly and they didn't just get put up cause the saddle came off.

I don't recall , when I was a kid, ever having a problem when I started saddling them again. I frequently practiced bareback, but saddled for the shows every week.
     
    06-13-2008, 02:05 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Riding bareback should not be a problem :) I pefer to ride bareback on hot days
     
    06-13-2008, 03:39 PM
  #6
Showing
Thanks a lot, guys!

Buckaroo, that's exactly the reason why I'm asking. :) It's been pretty hot lately, so I don't want to use heavy fleece pad/saddle so they go completely wet under.
     
    06-13-2008, 04:58 PM
  #7
Yearling
I ride my horse bareback, period. Our saddle is for special occasions. I saddle him up, every few weeks and plod around the barn every once and a while to remind him what saddles feel like, but I work him just the same bareback than I do saddled. My horse is a big boy though, he's slightly long in the back and very round making for a smooth ride no matter the gait so I can do cantering work like lead changes, and doing rollbacks and figure eights without losing my balance.

This is the pad I use:
http://www.bestfriendequine.com/comf...eback-pad.html

I was quite sore at first, so I bought a pad. I don't cinch it up real tight at all just enough to where if I gave the pad a tug its not going to give, its got the nonslip bottom and you are not supposed to use the pad for balance, just for comfort so it doesn't have to be tight at all. I use my pad for long rides, like out on the trail to keep my buns from getting sore, or when I wear my white breeches ^^.

Riding bareback helped me and Lucky A LOT with leg yielding. I can spin him in a circle without touching my reins, it's was extremely excited the day we succeeded.
     
    06-14-2008, 04:33 AM
  #8
Yearling
I am a huuuge fan of riding bareback. However, I just thought I'd mention this for all those who were curious:

Many many classical dressage trainers do not sit the trot for a long time with young horses, because the horse does not have the muscle to carry them and therefore, sitting the trot encourages them to be hollow. ...And I completely agree. How can I argue with hundreds of years of expert training? Lol So on a bareback note, I can see that sitting bareback could encourage and teach a horse to be hollow. However, I also know that not everyone aspires collection, and most certainly not in the classical sense... so yeah. It's not a crime to ride bareback, lol, but if you were training for dressage I wouldn't recommend it.
     
    06-14-2008, 03:30 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by mayfieldk
I am a huuuge fan of riding bareback. However, I just thought I'd mention this for all those who were curious:

Many many classical dressage trainers do not sit the trot for a long time with young horses, because the horse does not have the muscle to carry them and therefore, sitting the trot encourages them to be hollow. ...And I completely agree. How can I argue with hundreds of years of expert training? Lol So on a bareback note, I can see that sitting bareback could encourage and teach a horse to be hollow. However, I also know that not everyone aspires collection, and most certainly not in the classical sense... so yeah. It's not a crime to ride bareback, lol, but if you were training for dressage I wouldn't recommend it.
that's really interesting.....
     
    06-14-2008, 07:12 PM
  #10
Trained
I ride a bit bareback. Possum is only just learning to have a rider on bareback so I've been doing it more often.

I think as long as you still maintain proper position on the back then there is no reason for bareback riding to cause any damage to their back
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0