Working with my mare - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Working with my mare

This is a discussion on Working with my mare within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        01-25-2007, 08:09 PM
      #21
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kristy
    I have to admit, she is such a character. Longingly starring at the cows.. too funny. My horse is terrified of cows, yours.. wants to become one.
    i think this is
    #1 cause she's lonely, and
    #2 nick worked her at the arena moving steers, so she is familiar with cows.

    Quote:
    I also don't think you're so much of a novice after all!
    ahhh hah!! I see, so you thought I was :o


    Quote:
    Anyway, I have an appendix quarter horse whom has had time for about every training issue in the world after being around for 22 years. The things he conjures up... :roll:
    since you have one too, do you find him to be somewhat friskier than an reg QH?? More hot so to speak?? And if so, what do you do, to calm him?

    Quote:
    But, I do understand the barn sour problem,
    oh man, is that ever a pain in the ar*se

    Quote:
    They eventually realize the unnecessary work and stop. How long they stop is uncertain.
    i hope she learns this real fast. She is doing far more unnecessary work than she needs too. :(

    Quote:
    Anyway, I think you got it down. =) Please do update!! If this falls through and doesn't work, we can always make a plan B.
    i better have it down, cause i'm running out of options here. Plan B???
    Oh man, I hope its better than one suggested....... (½-1cc Ace), cause I certainly don't like that idea at all!!!
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        01-25-2007, 08:46 PM
      #22
    Yearling
    Quote:
    ahhh hah!! I see, so you thought I was :Surprised: :Wink:
    YOU TOLD ME YOU WERE!! YOU SAID IT FIRST!! *pout*

    Quote:
    since you have one too, do you find him to be somewhat friskier than an reg QH?? More hot so to speak?? And if so, what do you do, to calm him?
    Oh Lord yes. He makes sure that I do NOT forget he is half TB. He fortunately is older and in the "quiet" stage. After working with a lot of younger horses, I'm so glad to come home to an older horse. I do miss his youth, though :(. Regardless, he is full of life and energy. I switched his feed from sweet feed to senior. I also have him turned out half the day and used as a lesson horse. When I want to ride, I lounge him first if he is full of himself to get the "stupids" out. I then try to maintain his energy when riding. If I were to go on a trail, I would probably lounge briefly, warm up in the arena and then go on a trail. I believe this prepares us, in a sense. I get a feel for his mood, he dispenses extra energy. Switching feed was a wonderful thing, though. It was the most effective.

    There are also supplements to calm horses. They claim to have all natural ingredients, but I'm not very familiar with them. (I would look up the effects of the ingredients and such) Some examples -Vita-calm, So-kalm, and At-ease. At-ease described the product like: 'A natural calming agent with thiamine, tryptophan, magnesium, and pyridoxins to take the edge off horses without sedation"
    I've noticed most contain tryptophan. Here's a great but slightly disappointing website on tryptophan: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Abstract
    But maybe there is another natural remedy? No traqs though :( :(
         
        01-25-2007, 09:05 PM
      #23
    Foal
    I really don't consider myself a novice, BUT, I am when it comes to training/working with a horse like tj.

    I have quite a bit of experience riding as far as in western pleasure, pole bending, trail classes, etc., plus bareback bronc riding, and really lots of experience riding down a road for a long ways.....

    Hubby is buying panels for a round pen. HE has already decided!!! That is my plan, to do like you, round pen her before riding to take the edge off. (she always has the "stupids") tj isn't half TB, but her top side is full of them, (bold ruler, native dancer, three bars....just to name a few)

    Hubby and I use to take a "natural supplement" called L-Trytophan. It was a marvelous supplement that would relax us enough to sleep at night. Then they took it off the market cause some people died (they had heart probs that were affected by it).
    I am very familiar with trytophan and love it. Hubby was a "Type A personality" for many years and most of the time that was all he could do to help him relax.
    you know why men always fall asleep after eating a big thanksgiving dinner???? Turkey is naturally full of trytophan.....
         
        01-25-2007, 11:39 PM
      #24
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mommadog1956
    hubby and I use to take a "natural supplement" called L-Trytophan. It was a marvelous supplement that would relax us enough to sleep at night. Then they took it off the market cause some people died (they had heart probs that were affected by it).
    I am very familiar with trytophan and love it. Hubby was a "Type A personality" for many years and most of the time that was all he could do to help him relax.
    you know why men always fall asleep after eating a big thanksgiving dinner???? Turkey is naturally full of trytophan.....
    Good, you're familiar! I really do wonder the effects it has on a horse. They haven't done very many studies, but the studies are increasing due to more and more people giving it to their horses. I took melatonin(sp?) to sleep at one point in time and it worked very well. Surely, if I can find natural remedies that benefit me, it's possible for a horse as well? Very interesting. Perhaps you could find a supplement meant for relaxation with ingredients you're comfortable with and give it a try. Who knows, it may work miracles or not work at all.
         
        01-29-2007, 10:49 AM
      #25
    Foal
    Yesterday went no better........

    I took her to the end of the driveway and of course, she wanted to go left. I let her go to the left and then I did circles, to show her that its not a fun place to be, but that she will have to work there. She didn't care, just started rearing and trying to go where she wanted. [ the only reason I can think of as to why she wants to go left, is cause when we brought her home from Nicks, I rode her the entire way home. To get back to Nick's is the direction she wants to go. (8 miles away) it was not a pleasant ride for her, that day we brought her home, as I made her work the entire way home, and by the time we got here, she was exhausted. Literally, she could hardly take another step!!! But its still the only direction she wants to go. ]

    Then I took her into our big pasture and she rode fairly good in there, except for her wanting to go fast. I mostly made her walk & trot, which she didn't like, but I didn't care. For the most part, I had control of the situation.

    Then I took her back to the road and went to the right, towards that dreaded bridge. It was a rodeo all the way. I finally got her to the bridge and she would go no further. I dismounted this time and attempted to lead her across. We got to the the middle of the bridge and I stopped her for a few minutes, letting her see it was nothing to be afraid of. She kept looking back towards the house and would try to go back home. So I walked her on across the bridge to the other side, I stopped and just stood there. Then I took her a little farther and stopped. We did this 4-5 times, go a few steps further and then stop. Then I mounted back up.

    She immediately tried to go back home. So more circles, and the standing still. All the while she tried to look towards home. (remember there are no other horses there, just her pen/barn)

    I know she has gotten control of the situation. it appears she has become so afraid to leave the confines of her pen, that to get too far away, she has to get back. One way or the other. She almost went over backwards one time. That was scary... I just don't know how to get control again. :(

    Hubby was there with me this time and he told me to put a whip to her and make her mind. (this from someone that has no actual horse experience other than TV) I would not whip her. She is so touchy that the slightest movement makes her want to leap forward. IF I get her to go forward, she wants to go as fast as possible, but not straight, she wants to veer off the road into the ditch or pasture, but its not safe footing. And she is very hard to control at this point. Its like she has gone back to the stage of no rein control. She will go forward a few steps and then whirl around the other direction. (when she whirls around, its almost like a "roll-back".)

    I'm now questioning everything. Is the bit right for her? Is there something wrong with the tack? Feed too high energy?, etc.,
    We have her in a short-shank dogbone snaffle, which is what Nick wanted her in for more control. He said it works best for her, but i'm not so sure now. I have almost no control. One time yesterday, she even had the bit in her mouth sideways - the left shank was completely inside her mouth. I had to dismount to correct it, and then re-mount. (i've had all her tack checked by Nick and he says everything is fine.)

    Finally, I took her home and tied her to that (hated) hitching post and left her there for awhile. She, of course, pawed and circled the post for awhile, but finally just stood there. She was home and safe(in her mind), so it was ok with her. Once she was standing still, consistently for about 30 minutes, then I went back to her, took her to the barn, cleaned her up, blanketed her, and put her away. She was calm, sleepy-eyed, and generally a completely different horse.

    You know the funny thing is, once I put her back in her pen, she just stands there like "hey, come back here, I want to be with you!!". She obviously wants to be with me, but on her terms, not mine.

    So, to sum it up, on the ground she is wonderful. Mounted she is a wild, unmanagable devil creature. SOMETIMES!!! I know she has gotten her bluff in on me. "if I start rearing, she will get scared and get off me". (yes, I get scared when she rears up high, its not safe.) I can handle those little rears, but not the "hi-ho silver" ones, where she's almost straight up.

    Time for plan B??? (round pen is not coming soon enough)

    BTW - kristy - I heard a lady today say that she has a little bag of lavender that she lets her horse smell before working and he calms right down. Ever hear of that one???
         
        01-31-2007, 12:11 AM
      #26
    Foal
    Getting in the miles

    Have you tried leading her along on the route you want to take? If she is forced to go the way she doesn't want to go a few times, she may stop trying to assert herself as much. My mare is much better behaved under saddle when exercise her by running on the lead. She burns off some energy and I can focus intensely on making her listen to me.

    While ground work isn't the same as riding, it does contribute to "getting in the miles".
         
        01-31-2007, 11:38 AM
      #27
    Yearling
    Yes, lavender is chemically believed to have relaxing effects on humans and (from what we can tell) animals. I use lavender lotion at times when I'm wanting to sleep or calm down. Lavender has wonderful properties.

    Quote:
    she almost went over backwards one time. That was scary... I just don't know how to get control again.
    I believe a good horse person has the ability to distinguish when they are in over their head.
    Momma, from my internet view, I feel as if you have done what you could. I think now, continuing with the same methods will only result to the same behavior rather then progress or change while increasing the probability of you getting hurt.

    Quote:
    she wants to go as fast as possible, but not straight, she wants to veer off the road into the ditch or pasture, but its not safe footing. And she is very hard to control at this point. Its like she has gone back to the stage of no rein control.
    It is also possible of back tracking at this point. Problems escalate into a disaster and a rider can be 12 steps behind where they originally started.

    At this point, it isn't worth getting hurt over or even risking injury. I think getting help from a professional is going to be the safest and sanest alternative. I think the biggest thing to consider now is:

    A. Do you truly want to spend the endless hours of hard work and quite a bit of money to correct this horse?

    Or

    B. Look into the possibility of a new horse which you are safe and comfortable with.

    I always suggest looking for any type of pain, but since she seems to raise hell only when she leaves the house, I think it isn't pain related. But, always worth checking, for sure!

    Of course, these are just my suggestions from an internet stand point! Either way you decide, I'll be glad to help in any way. Let me know if I'm totally off or if you are some what nodding while reading this.
         
        01-31-2007, 07:09 PM
      #28
    Foal
    No Dave, I haven't tried that as yet. We got another 3+ inches of snow today, so that has once again sidelined me for awhile. I have considered that option though.

    My friends hubby also asked yesterday if he could come ride her. He did a couple of months ago and really had no probs with her. I think he wants to see if it goes that way again, or if she has become so barn sour that even he can't ride her. I've also considered asking my trainer to come up and take a go with her to see what he thinks. But once again, the weather makes that option down the road a bit.

    Kristy:
    Lavender - yeah me too!! Or when I want to get hubby to sleep quickly

    I agree with pretty much everything you said, and yes my head was nodding several times. Hubby says: "trying the same thing, the same way, but expecting different results is called insanity". So yeah, at this point I may be insane.

    I don't want to get hurt, either one of us. But i'm not ready to call it quits with her either. I think that has happened too much in her past, and I think that is partially why she is so barn sour. Not really sure where her home is, but when something/somewhere starts to feel comfortable to her, she is afraid to leave it.

    I'm not afraid of hard work. I don't know about spending anymore money on her with training though. Just have to see what nick says about it. He had her for 5 weeks, and had her pretty well worked out. All this crap with her started after my last ride with my friend and her two horses. They did good on the road, but once they went back home, she started getting this way.

    The farrier came today and he eventually had to put what I think was a stud chain on her. Not sure since i've never seen one, only heard about them. (lead rope with a chain on the end, he put in her mouth and she worked it like a pacifier.) he tried a twitch but couldn't even get it on her. She was so intent on keeping her eye on those dang cows across the road. He finally got her feet done. Usually she stands perfectly calm for him.

    Ahhhh well, the continuing saga of my life with tj. It will all work out, or it won't.......
         
        01-31-2007, 10:28 PM
      #29
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mommadog1956
    hubby says: "trying the same thing, the same way, but expecting different results is called insanity". So yeah, at this point I may be insane.
    I was thinking the same thing! But I'm so guilty of repetition. I get the mind set of "maybe this time.." or "if I could just do this.."

    I am glad you have chosen the option you have. Safety comes first, dedication comes second in my opinion. I believe you are hard working and dedicated to this girl. You've put a lot of time in her, that's for sure. The only thing I can see being an issue is money, unfortunately. (I hate that money can put such limitations - mainly because I don't have it.) I still believe she will require help from your trainer eventually, but I believe it will work out.

    For the mean time, what is she being fed? Have I already asked? I am crazy, you know.

    And also, have you had a vet do somewhat of a pre-purchase exam? I think ruling out pain completely may be a good option. Check everything, including teeth. Does she still have her wold teeth? Also, how is her vision? Horses that are extremely spooky or resistant often have problems with their eye sight. It could be possible she has a visual problem making her extremely uncomfortable in a new environment (trail.) These are just possibilities to check in the mean time, you never know.
         
        02-01-2007, 09:18 AM
      #30
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kristy

    For the mean time, what is she being fed? Have I already asked? I am crazy, you know.

    And also, have you had a vet do somewhat of a pre-purchase exam? I think ruling out pain completely may be a good option. Check everything, including teeth. Does she still have her wold teeth? Also, how is her vision? Horses that are extremely spooky or resistant often have problems with their eye sight. It could be possible she has a visual problem making her extremely uncomfortable in a new environment (trail.) These are just possibilities to check in the mean time, you never know.
    she is being fed a 14% feed mixed up special by the co-op. If you remember, we consulted an equine nutritionist about her weight issue and he works at the co-op. It has a small amt of molasses in it, but just enough for the moisture content. It also has corn, oats, soybean oil, and barley. (i think I got it all) she also gets a small flake of alfalfa in the am and a larger flake in pm. Plus all the prairie hay she wants 24/7 (which she doesn't eat much of)lol.

    No vet check, but her wolf teeth are gone. Assuming her vision is good since she watches the cows all day and she seems to be able to see things far off. I've had nick check her out pretty good, plus the farrier looked at her teeth real good. Both said she is in fine health but still a little underweight. She is up to 1064 lbs as of last week. That is a huge improvement cause when we got her she was only 934 lbs. At 16'hh. She rates just slightly at a 5 on the body conditioning scale.
         

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:32 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0