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Working/Riding a Stallion around other Horses

This is a discussion on Working/Riding a Stallion around other Horses within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • What did they use for horses when they put around the necks for working horses

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    01-19-2012, 11:51 AM
  #11
Started
I'm not sure what you mean by the native breed. Could you clarify?
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    01-19-2012, 09:38 PM
  #12
Foal
Ah, sorry. I'm from the Philippines. They seem to have these ponies here but don't have a particular name for the breed...at least not that I know of. Sometimes they just call them pinoy or visayan locally. They could be brought over from the spanish...maybe some from the Americans. I know some are imported from Australia.

So I am really not sure what to make of it. The native horses remind me a lot of the Mongolian Pony. Short necks very small usually no more than 13hh.. very narrow but super strong and sturdy/hardy. They come in a huge variety of colors but they have the same characteristic build.
Here is my album.
Pictrues of Horses pictures by cintillate - Photobucket
Not all these horses are mine. The last one I was told is Thoroughbred, he was big but the neck and other features made me thing he has native in him. I also have one of me next to my tiny stallion just so you get a sense of how small he is. I'm 5'6

These are my 3
http://i1236.photobucket.com/albums/...s/DSC01275.jpg
The 2 on the outside are native horses. The one in the middle is a Quarab with a bit of native.

But if you type it in google you don't get much. If you type Philippine horse you'll get them and mostly pictures of horse fights. They use the native one for horse fights, I wouldn't dream of putting mine in one and pretty sure it is illegal but who knows may be after years of being bred to fight that could explain their aggressiveness.

Here are some carrying riders
Horse Back Riding Moalboal Cebu Philippines

If you read they just refer to them as "our native horses"

So, I hope that helps.
     
    01-19-2012, 10:14 PM
  #13
Started
They are pretty horses! I definitely see the short neck, but I think they are gorgeous! I had no idea that there was a native breed of any type in the Phillipines. Thank you for sharing all of that information and the pictures. It is unfortunate that they are used for fighting. One could be indicative of the other. If they are a naturally aggressive breed, it is unfortunate that it is exploited like that if that is the case. Of course, any fighting is sad.
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    01-19-2012, 11:20 PM
  #14
Foal
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by SEAmom    
They are pretty horses! I definitely see the short neck, but I think they are gorgeous! I had no idea that there was a native breed of any type in the Phillipines. Thank you for sharing all of that information and the pictures. It is unfortunate that they are used for fighting. One could be indicative of the other. If they are a naturally aggressive breed, it is unfortunate that it is exploited like that if that is the case. Of course, any fighting is sad.
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No problem, I love these little guys. Yes, it is sad to hear that they are used for fighting. A plus side to their being aggressive and not having natural predators here is that they are not flighty/spooky or high strung and can be very laid back. Downside establishing respect with them is a challenge.
     
    01-21-2012, 01:07 PM
  #15
Banned
My stallion is the best behaved horse in my barn. I don't have to worry about much with him when I'm on him or have him on the lead. He sometimes gets a little studdy when he's out in the pasture or in his stall and a mare gets too close. But he knows who's boss and is nothing but respectful to his rider and everyone around when he's tacked up or on the lead.

We've put sooooo much work into him though. And it is never ending. He needs constant training so he doesn't forget. But he's truly a good boy, and very well tempered. He gets embarrassed when he gets in trouble, so he avoids it at all costs.
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    01-21-2012, 01:44 PM
  #16
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahAnn    
He gets embarrassed when he gets in trouble, so he avoids it at all costs.
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I had to chuckle at this, I told someone that my stallion was embarassed because I got after him and they told me I was 'Nuckin' Futz'. They were not horse folks. But I totally know what you mean, it's that head duck, lip lick, sideways, "AW SHUCKS" look they give you when you've had to correct them.

I have friends who will not ride with me if I'm riding my stallion. They refuse to go on any ride with a stallion, if they know there's a stallion ahead of time. I've learned to enjoy riding by myself because of them. I just refuse to let other people dictate who I'll ride or not, when my stallion is trained to within an inch of his life. I always ride drag so that I can see what he's thinking about before he thinks it, I'm always ready to kick his rear if he needs it for getting studly under saddle and would NEVER allow him to get close enough to a mare to cause trouble. If 2 stallions show up on a ride, I'll ride the opposite end of the ride from the other stallion, just to make sure the peace is kept. I know I sure as H*LL don't want to be on board during a stallion fight or when old Romeo decides to grace some girl with his manly presence!

Unfortunately, many people don't keep their stallions in line or train them to behave. They just say, "Well, he's a stallion", like that excuses anything. I want my stallion to think he's a gelding unless it's breeding season and he's in his special halter on a date with a mare. Otherwise, no talking, screaming or squealing, no striking, no bowing up, none of that is tolerated.
     
    01-21-2012, 01:54 PM
  #17
Banned
My stallion is one loud mouthed boy! But again, never under saddle or on the lead. If I hear even the slightest squeak out of him he gets corrected.

And I totally understand what you mean about people allowing stallions to be disrespectful "because he's a stallion." Its frustrating. I think far too many people pass judgment based soley on the word "stallion." Because an intact male horse should be allowed to act differently then any other horse?

My husband thought a stallion was a breed of crazy horses. This was of course many years ago, and long before we ever owned one ourselves. But he said the its the media that puts these images in people heads. There are so many movies with crazy stallions in them, that it creates a bias.


Tell your friends to be a little open minded. If not for stallions there would be no horses.
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    01-21-2012, 02:14 PM
  #18
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahAnn    
My stallion is one loud mouthed boy! But again, never under saddle or on the lead. If I hear even the slightest squeak out of him he gets corrected.

........

Tell your friends to be a little open minded. If not for stallions there would be no horses.
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My boys all know what, "NO TALKING" means. From the time they're little, if they make a sound while being led somewhere or screaming at a mare in their stalls, they get shanked hard and told, "NO TALKING". By the time they're full grown they are very quiet. Out in their stallion yard they can talk all they want but on the lead or under saddle, or basically if I'm around, they better hush.

As for the friends, I've learned that the sound of a mind slamming shut is pretty final. I don't fight them. If I want to ride one of the boys I don't go with them. If they call up to see if I want to go on a ride, I take my 'go to' mare and go with them. If we run into each other and I'm on one of the boys, I just step aside and let them pass. It's funny, their MARES are the ones who make a scene, my boy will stand and just graze as they go by. You should see them trying to handle their squatting, squealing mares......it's pretty dang funny.
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    01-21-2012, 02:15 PM
  #19
Green Broke
Sarah, do you think it's a case of being close minded, or mindful of one's own safety?

I've ridden my lovely mare with several stallions over the years, and they were gentlemen, but the riders were very experienced and watchful. I have had the unfortunate experience of riding with one stallion and rider that were not. Made for a very tense ride. I have never ridden with that particular stallion since.
     
    01-21-2012, 03:23 PM
  #20
Trained
Futurity colts come the trainer intact, in the beginning it can be a little chaotic dealing with them. Especialing when you end up with several at a time. It doesn't take long before everyone settles into the training program and everyone is taught that they are not allowed to talk or be rude. I found it to be more a personality trait as far which ones are very obedient and want to please and those who are a pain and can't help to hollar at a horse at the other end of the arena even though he knows he will be corrected.

But no matter what stallions are stallions and horses are horses - saftey is priority for yourself and others around you.
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