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Yeah, But, MY Horse…

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        03-21-2013, 10:10 PM
      #21
    Weanling
    "Yes but it's cute"
    "Yes but he's just a baby"*** this one makes me so mad! Teach them right from the start, just because they are young doesn't mean they can be disrespectful!!
    Corporal likes this.
         
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        03-22-2013, 03:11 AM
      #22
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Copperhead    
    I used to train fox hunters at a well known facility, and I've been on high speed chases for hours. Ill never agree with that kind of negligent riding. That horse is lucky you didn't break him. It's never sensible to use the excuse "I'm a fox hunter" for reckless riding. I've seen people broken by that sort of "I'm a fox hunter" mentality (and my old boss knew of people who died) and I saw two horses destroyed because of that sort if riding on the hunt.

    The fox is never that important. And for the record, the facility I worked for held one of the highest catch counts in the USA for game. We took it very seriously.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Copperhead    
    I would also like to add that I have seen people dismissed from a hunt due to reckless riding and kicked off of guest horses. Fox hunting is dangerous enough while riding smart, it's deadly when you don't use the caution you need to. All of our kills were obtained while riding intelligently, not carelessly.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Well, there is a big difference between hunting in the UK and USA.
    I have never killed a horse following hounds - although I have had one drop dead under me when he suffered a fatal aneurism - at the time we were just moving off from the Meet so he had not been stressed.
    Nor have I ever been 'kicked off' for reckless riding.

    I have never Fox Hunted in the USA but have followed hounds in VA and NC. All seemed far to organised with little jumps and no real cross country riding.

    I am not going to turn this into a discussion on hunting or reckless riding. I wrote what happened. Doubt I would have the bottle to do such a thing nowadays as I am older (by lots) and stiffer. The thrill is not riding thoughtlessly but of being able to follow hounds in a direct line as possible. Many a time I have stopped on a hill watching hounds work whilst the rest of the Field follow, knowing that (and hoping I am right) that the fox will swing around and come back up the hill, thus saving the horse from extra work and, if I am correct, being right up the front on a horse that has regained his second wind.

    As for having to 'know' a horse or the country you are riding, that is rubbish.

    I have made more hunters. Horses that are good in the hunting field, stand, open and close gates, can crack a whip on them and ride among hounds without them kicking or getting fussed - you do not get that if you are riding dangerously or carelessly.

    I can assure you when you hunt around here the hedges are often over 5' high and twice as wide - you need to be a bold, confident rider to encourage any horse to keep popping fences like these.

    I get on a horse and expect it to do as I want. I am not a 'yes but' person. I do not over ride any horse, I would not expect a green horse to know more than it does but I would be able to assess a horse's ability within minutes of riding it.
         
        03-22-2013, 03:52 AM
      #23
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
    I get on a horse and expect it to do as I want. I am not a 'yes but' person. I do not over ride any horse, I would not expect a green horse to know more than it does but I would be able to assess a horse's ability within minutes of riding it.
    An experienced rider can easily assess a horse's ability and training level within a few minutes of riding. Also will have a good inkling of the horse's personality. It is possible to make a general overview of a field or area and assess the ground condition (boggy, lots of holes, ground debris) and feel safe to gallop on it. Many competent riders can safely take a horse out and gallop even if they have not met the horse before. Occasionally a person is wrong about things like whether there is a pond or perhaps the edge of a cliff coming up.

    About the article: I believe you should never make excuses for your horse, and you should also always make excuses for your horse. You should not excuse behavior such as biting, kicking, or bad manners. Yet you should always give your horse the benefit of the doubt for unsuitable behavior if they are overfaced, overwhelmed, have a poor rider on board, or have been taken away suddenly from a horse they were never separated from for ten years.

    My rule is to decide how I would react if I were the horse. If I were a kid, would I stand smiling as all the other kids ran off to eat all the pizza while my mom decided to brush my hair? If someone threw me out into the woods at night would I jump if I heard a scary sound? If there was clearly a dry path around a puddle in the road, would I want to walk through it or would you need to convince me why I had to? Horses have emotions and their own thoughts and desires. They are not machines.

    What I see more often are people who believe their horse is bratty and misbehaving when they actually should be looking for the reasons why they are behaving that way. A horse I knew was put down after rearing over onto a rider. The horse had refused to go after being taken out and ridden for six hours. The horse had been on stall rest for two months prior to this, and it was the first time out of the stall for more than 5 minutes. The owner brought out whips and spurs, yet the horse was considered bad for flipping over.
         
        03-22-2013, 06:56 PM
      #24
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LynnF    
    "Yes but it's cute"
    "Yes but he's just a baby"*** this one makes me so mad! Teach them right from the start, just because they are young doesn't mean they can be disrespectful!!
    I completely agree with you. Being a baby is not an excuse for bad behavior. Or being a baby stud colt either. I have two stud colts a yearling and a 18 month old and they are well behaved and when they aren't they get reprimanded for their behavior accordingly. I expect the same behavior from them as my adult horses. They can make mistakes of course but I always remind them what is correct. I also owned a 3 year old TB stud I bought off the track. He had been given a very nice start and I did the riding traing. I took him to rodeo's and trail rides and you would of never known he was a stud unless I told you. He stayed a stud for a bit till the weather got cooler. I didn't want to geld him in 100 degree heat, I didnt want him to be miserable lol.

    I also rode a horse for someone because she wanted the horse to "like women" suppossedly the horse hated women but would behave for men. But what really was happening she was afraid of him and he knew it and would take total advantage of her lol.
         
        03-23-2013, 06:35 AM
      #25
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dustbunny    
    Being a devout coward, I'm happy these days with forward movement at a slow pace.
    I agree. *ahem* however I prefer to think of it as the wisdom brought on by years of experience and the sure knowledge that gravity indeed does work
    horsecrazygirl and Dustbunny like this.
         
        03-23-2013, 01:55 PM
      #26
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DimSum    
    I agree. *ahem* however I prefer to think of it as the wisdom brought on by years of experience and the sure knowledge that gravity indeed does work
    I am a lot older than those days nearly x 3. Not anywhere near as brave though, if I am on a horse that does mess around I will still ride it out.

    If Copperhead thought that was reckless then they wouldn't sleep if I told some of the things we got up to as children!
    Fahntasia and FaydesMom like this.
         

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