Yearling Problems
 
 

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Yearling Problems

This is a discussion on Yearling Problems within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Dealing with problem yealing horses
  • Yearling problems

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  • 1 Post By oh vair oh
  • 2 Post By Kayella

 
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    02-20-2013, 08:55 AM
  #1
Weanling
Yearling Problems

In my barn there is a small step up from the dirt floor of the horses' part to the concrete where we keep feed, tack, etc. Once when it was really humid, the floor was kinda slick and when we brought our yearling through he slipped on the floor and now he's scared to go back down that little step to get back into the horse part of the barn. He tries for a little while then he just stands there and will not make any effort to move. We've tried pulling, pushing, backing, and even just letting him stand there and seeing if he will become interested again. Now every time we take him out, it takes like half an hour to get him back in!
     
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    02-20-2013, 03:49 PM
  #2
Started
Does your yearling know how to "send"? I'm prepping my yearling for trailer loading, so it's imperative that she gets used to stepping up or onto scary objects. Take her out and learn how to send her down a fence line, kind of like ground-driving, but standing still. You should point in a direction, and she should go in that direction. If she doesn't, reinforce with the end of your leadrope, carrot-stick, or whatever you have. You can probably look up sending exercises in the NH pages.

Then take her out and send her over poles. Send her over a piece of wood. Send her over a tarp. She has to go where you send her with confidence. Moving backwards or stalling out is not an option, she must move forward and come off the pressure, even in a scary situation.

You can even ask her to come into pressure. I will stand in front of my yearling, pull forward. If she does not move forward, I will add pressure by spinning my rope rhythmically next to her. If she steps forward, I stop spinning and release pressure. When I'm in a tight spot, like a trailer or barn aisle, I can ask her to come forward with emphasis by spinning my rope and encouraging her to come through pressure.
Thunderspark likes this.
     
    02-20-2013, 10:35 PM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh vair oh    
Does your yearling know how to "send"? I'm prepping my yearling for trailer loading, so it's imperative that she gets used to stepping up or onto scary objects. Take her out and learn how to send her down a fence line, kind of like ground-driving, but standing still. You should point in a direction, and she should go in that direction. If she doesn't, reinforce with the end of your leadrope, carrot-stick, or whatever you have. You can probably look up sending exercises in the NH pages.

Then take her out and send her over poles. Send her over a piece of wood. Send her over a tarp. She has to go where you send her with confidence. Moving backwards or stalling out is not an option, she must move forward and come off the pressure, even in a scary situation.

You can even ask her to come into pressure. I will stand in front of my yearling, pull forward. If she does not move forward, I will add pressure by spinning my rope rhythmically next to her. If she steps forward, I stop spinning and release pressure. When I'm in a tight spot, like a trailer or barn aisle, I can ask her to come forward with emphasis by spinning my rope and encouraging her to come through pressure.
Thank you, I will definitely try the sending exercises. Under normal cicumstances he moves forward and back willingly, but when he is really set about not doing something he's old enough that he can kind of overpower me. And you're right that's NOT going to be an option!
     
    02-21-2013, 10:49 AM
  #4
Weanling
You might think about painting that part with paint containing sand to improve the footing to prevent "slippag" in the future....it's made especially for that purpose (don't know what it's called, sorry). Or laying down some of the stuff they use on RV steps (adhesive backed).
     
    02-21-2013, 11:03 AM
  #5
Weanling
I have never heard of the "send" training it sound interesting. If this was my horse I would treat this just like a trailer loading issue, the issue is the same you are leading and he is not willing to move forward with you. Work on leading, your horse should follow you off a cliff if you step off with him, he is young he will come out of this, I would stay away from the "real issue" until you think you have made some big improvements in his leading training. Tarps are great get him leading over the tarp, over ground polls, into trailers, if you have a box he can stand on lead him onto and off the box.
When you go back to the "real issue" the step try not to think about it. Think about him walking right up on it without any problems. I think sometime we get worked up over ........whatever fill in the blank and we "teach" our horses to be scared of it because we are scared they will be scared so they get scared.

Lastly you all might think I am nuts but check out the "Clicker training" tread. I have never tried it. But one of the people I talk to there had a BIG break through with a mare that she couldn't get out of her paddock. It worked for her how knows. The thread is "CT support group" it was started by PunksTank.
     
    02-21-2013, 11:15 AM
  #6
Green Broke
The sending method that OVO described is great. I've gotten Henny moving over stuff from my right and halting him on my left and vice versa. It's like half a lunge circle. I point the direction I want him to go, kiss, and he goes there and halts when I yield his hindquarters. This is a great exercise for sending them through gates as well. It's come in handy for me many times.

Take some time to work on your groundwork. Get him listening and respectful of you. Once you get that established, go to the ledge. If he won't go over then, walk in front of him to the end of your lead. Pick up the slack and put pressure on him and pull him towards you. Don't try to actually pull him forward, just keep the pressure on him where it's uncomfortable. If he makes any sort of movement forward, even just shifting his weight forward, immediately release the pressure and praise the crap out of him. Then pick up the pressure and ask him forward again. This time, ask for a little more. Once he moves forward, release and praise again. It is going to take a while. But it's either fix it now or fix it two years from now when you're getting ready to ride and he's not on your level of willingness. Pressure and release has helped with my 10 month old colt a lot. Some days he's better behaved than most 10 year olds. Some days he's a little snot. It comes with age. Teach him that he should look at you as a leader and should trust that you're not going to lead him through anything that will kill him. He should have trust in your confidence and know nothing is going to harm him.
Thunderspark and CowboyBob like this.
     
    02-22-2013, 02:15 AM
  #7
Yearling
All my horses know the sending exercise too. My soon to be 4yr. Old has had all the ground work done with him, he was born here so I was able to work with him right from day one. He loads, he jumps logs, he knows how to send over a wooden bridge (small one in my training arena).......I would work on sending like the others have said.....good luck and keep us posted!
     

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