Yearling wants to play
 
 

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Yearling wants to play

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  • Training yearlings games
  • Yearling tries to play

 
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    12-11-2007, 09:37 PM
  #1
Foal
Yearling wants to play

How can I teach my yearling she cannot play with people. Sometimes she will stand next to ya and rare up (only about two feet) she'll buck and just get crazy. She will kinda try and herd you. She has done this to me and my husband. I am sure the snow has something to do with it never really seen much of this stuff in her short life so far. I thought of lunging her but with winter and all the ice we have gotton here. I thought maybe some one has another idea. I sure don't want anybody hurt. Her and the gelding play alot and how she plays with him is what Im seeing her try to do with us. Today when I went to add more hay to feeder I had to use the big bucket to keep her back, my husband had to used the plastic pitch fork handel to keep her back alittle. She is not really timid about anything. And nothing really spooks her either. Hopefully someone has an idea. Thank you.
     
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    12-11-2007, 10:36 PM
  #2
Weanling
Hi Cory-boy.

Sounds to me like the mare may have a problem with who is in charge in your barn. I would try tying her to the wall of her stall for about 2 hours a day and get much stricter with the way you interact with her. Make her think about the world a little more as a horse and make it clear that you are not part of her heard but that you are incharge. She may rebel a little at first and you may find her behaviour gets worse before it improves but tying her to a wall will teach her patients. She will learn over a few weeks that the world does not revolve around her....
     
    12-11-2007, 10:45 PM
  #3
Foal
playing

Maybe when you approuch her you could try and do horsemanship???
Like if you have a rope halter or somethin that would help
You could walk forward and let her follow and if she gets 2 close wiggle the rope at her until she backs out of ur space

:) :) I hope this helps
     
    12-12-2007, 12:41 AM
  #4
Yearling
I am not sure what tying her to the wall would do to teach her to leave you alone while you work in her pen?? I might be missing something here. I do agree with tying younger/impatient horses for increasing periods of time in a safe setting to teach them to stand patiently and quietly...it really helps for working with and around them tied and taking them places where they must be tied, standing for vet/farrier, etc.

I find it funny how much I am suggesting this, but Parelli level I set. It will teach you how to communicate with your horse better, earn her respect, and stay safe. You can use the communication you learn to communicate to her that you are the dominant horse and her behavior is not acceptable to you. When you learn it, you should be able to use things like the driving game without touching her at all to drive her out of your space. NH "trained" horses are very good about responding to/moving out of peoples bubble, just through the increased pressure of their presence. It is a bit pricey, but worth it! AND perfect for your situation.
     
    12-12-2007, 01:31 AM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by AKPaintLover
I am not sure what tying her to the wall would do to teach her to leave you alone while you work in her pen?? I might be missing something here. I do agree with tying younger/impatient horses for increasing periods of time in a safe setting to teach them to stand patiently and quietly...it really helps for working with and around them tied and taking them places where they must be tied, standing for vet/farrier, etc.
I was just suggesting that if she learnt some patients that it may help her in her overall attitude towards traing in general

I have found that young horses tend to be naughty out of boredom so for her to learn that not all activities will be interesting for her often helps. I do agree that the 7 games are a very useful training tool also
     
    12-12-2007, 03:10 PM
  #6
Started
Yep, I, too, suggest getting the Parelli Level 1 pack. It's all about SAFETY and it will really help you teach your little horse respect and to stay out of your space until you invite her in. It's great!
     
    12-12-2007, 08:26 PM
  #7
Showing
Between weaning and 1 yo my babys got a little goofy too. I had to walk down a narrow lane to feed them and they decided it was fun to run past me kicking a bucking. I started carrying a buggy whip with me and every time they tried to run past me I would smack them in the chest with the buggy whip. I don't know if that's proper or not but they learned to stay behind me and walk to be fed. Now if they get too close to me without being asked I raise my hands up above my head and do a 1..2..3.. smack, just batting at the air until they move away and if they don't, then comes the smack. I don't let them in my space unless invited. Its tough to be mean to them but they have to learn to respect you or they will walk all over you. A 1000 lb animal isn't something you want walking on you.
     
    12-13-2007, 04:57 AM
  #8
Weanling
Vidaloco has the right idea. If you don't want to use a whip, (although it won't hurt her if you do) then when ever she acts up, you need to be the crazy lady and scream, yell, wave your arms at her,stomp your feet at her, and let her think she is going to DIE!!!!! (for 10 seconds, then stop and act normal)

Yearlings can be pretty silly at times, but they are also children of a sort who are learning about the world. What may have been cute as a foal, or is adorable now, will NOT be when she is 1200lbs. She needs to learn manners now, not later. She needs to be disciplined instantly for any misbehavior she exhibits towards you. This does not mean beating her, or "being mean". Discipline is not mean. It is what a GOOD parent does to teach their "children".
     
    12-13-2007, 06:09 PM
  #9
Showing
I better add this before I get yelled at I would never beat my horses, when I say smack its more of a tapping on the chest. Actually beating the air first then tapping if I get no results. There I feel better
     
    12-14-2007, 09:51 PM
  #10
Foal
My two year old likes to play too, especially cause he has no other horse to play with. It's fine sometimes, I chase him around the pasture and stuff, but sometimes he gets a little close with his kicks, and once he tried to mount me (in play, he hadn't dropped or anything...lol). So I decided playing wasn't a great idea. I'd like to take him out and work with him more so he won't be so bored, but I only have small amounts of time at once, so I don't often feel like getting the halter out and all. Plus it's cold...
Anyway, try giving her tasks, like teaching her commands like "head down" and bending. Or teach her tricks, like bowing. It might keep her involved. Pops is fine when we're working on new skills.
     

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