Yielding the hindquarters/forequarters
   

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Yielding the hindquarters/forequarters

This is a discussion on Yielding the hindquarters/forequarters within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Yield horses forequarter keep hinds still
  • Teaching a horse to move is forquarters

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    03-02-2012, 10:17 AM
  #1
Weanling
Yielding the hindquarters/forequarters

I have a question. I have been working a lot on getting my horses to yield their hindquarters and forequarters. Which they do great, but my question is, when i'm yielding the hinquarters, how do I get my horse to keep her front feet still without moving, she should be kind of just pivotting around them but she completely moves them. Same for when i'm yielding the forequarters, she moves her back feet too, and I know they are supposed to just turn, not completely take steps. Help?
Thanks horse forum buddys.
     
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    03-02-2012, 10:41 AM
  #2
Green Broke
You're too much to the side. Move farther forward or back. Also when doing the rear have their head turned a little towards you.
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    03-02-2012, 11:32 AM
  #3
mls
Trained
Does the horse yield on the ground? If not, you may need to start there.

Under saddle use a wall or fence as a training partner. Stand next to the wall and ask the horse to move over - either front or hind - and complete the arc. If the horse steps forward or back - correct.

ONE step at a time so the horse understands. Focus on where your legs, feet and hands are as you communicate with the horse. Use one rein to indicate direction and the other to block.

I also like to set ground poles in a grid to work on lateral exercises. If the rider has objects to focus on, it can help relate that focus to the horse.
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    03-02-2012, 11:44 AM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
Does the horse yield on the ground? If not, you may need to start there.

Under saddle use a wall or fence as a training partner. Stand next to the wall and ask the horse to move over - either front or hind - and complete the arc. If the horse steps forward or back - correct.

ONE step at a time so the horse understands. Focus on where your legs, feet and hands are as you communicate with the horse. Use one rein to indicate direction and the other to block.

I also like to set ground poles in a grid to work on lateral exercises. If the rider has objects to focus on, it can help relate that focus to the horse.
Thanks MLS. Yes I am talking about me on the ground :] I haven't taken any of this up in the saddle yet, I am trying to first master the ground. Please keep the advice coming.
     
    03-02-2012, 11:47 AM
  #5
Super Moderator
Well, are you yielding per western or English rules? In English, it is incorrect for a horse to plant a foot and pivot on it. They are required to pick up and put down the foot for every step of the turn.
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    03-02-2012, 11:49 AM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
Well, are you yielding per western or English rules? In English, it is incorrect for a horse to plant a foot and pivot on it. They are required to pick up and put down the foot for every step of the turn.
No, I am all western!
     
    03-03-2012, 01:01 AM
  #7
Super Moderator
WELL, maybe your horse is telling you that he wants to be a fancy schmancy dressage horse!
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    03-03-2012, 01:15 AM
  #8
Weanling
I watched a man who was training pivots use a short cut that really worked for him... I have never tried it, but I don't see anything wrong with it...

He used a tallish tractor tire and woudl ask the horse to step in it with thier front feet and then ask for the pivot. He would do the same with the rear. It gave the horse an added barrier that was not going to hurt them, but helped guide them to keep thier legs in place.

I have only taught pivots to one horse, and he picked it up on his own so I can't tell you first hand. I have only seen this used.
     
    03-03-2012, 08:10 AM
  #9
Trained
My mare used to do that ! I agree with standing closer to the front or back. Also, make sure when your horse does it correctly, to stop right away and praise a lot.
     
    03-04-2012, 09:40 AM
  #10
Weanling
Thanks everyone for the suggestions!
     

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