you guys warned me
 
 

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you guys warned me

This is a discussion on you guys warned me within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        12-03-2007, 04:56 PM
      #1
    Foal
    you guys warned me

    Well it has been a while since I have posted here, I was in a accident with my horse. And this is the first chance I had to login.
    I had been working with pleasure, my horse part mustang and part walker, on oct 30th I had been down there and was lounging her and working thru the routine of flexing, disengaging both ends, and things, then after about 3 hors I got on her to ride her a little. Well I was on her for about 45 minutes then her ears went back and she took off running. I tried to stop her by the reins, tried getting a turn stop out of her, but she jumped a ditch and started bucking. She was in a dead run when I was thrown landing straight on my butt. I laid there for 15 minutes and couldnt move my legs or feel them for that matter. It is a scaary feeling. I was by myself, but had my rescue squad raidio on me called for an ambulance and went to the er. After 2 weeks and a mri I have 3 fractured vertibrates, bruised 4 discs, and have nerve damage to my left leg, it goes numb and gives out. No surgery that can help, just need time to heal. Before anyo ne says it, im not giving up on the horse, im just giving up on me breaking her. Time to find some one else to do it that knows how to. I have bought clinton andersons videos, and they are a big help. I know some will think im stupid for trying to break her myself, but those who do jsut think, there was a time when you broke your first horse. Im not afraid of her, just can't take much more throwing from her. I can not say I did not provoke it some how, but I can't think of anyway I did other than getting on her. Im still open for suggestions on the different ways to work with her. Jsut don't need to be reminded of how big of an idiot I was to get on ahorse. Brian
         
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        12-04-2007, 05:57 AM
      #2
    Showing
    Oh my gosh, I am so sorry. I know exactly how you feel though, and it can happen at any time not just when breaking a horse. I am still recovering from a fall right before Thanksgiving. My horse is completely broke but I guess I'm a klutz. I was just going too fast and doing something stupid. I was at a dead run too and fell on my butt/back/hip/head general are. I only fractured 3 transverse processes in my lumbar area. Nothing as bad as yours WOW I didn't think anything could make me feel better but you did
    You are so lucky you had your radio with you, you could still be laying out there if not
    I plan to break my babys to the point of saddle and then let someone else get them under saddle. I decided I am too old to be the first one on their backs. I applaude you for trying, and I will be the first to say your not stupid for getting on or falling off, it can happen to anyone.

    I want to add that this is a horse I have been riding for 3 years and hundreds of miles. She didn't do anything wrong, I did. I still love my pretty girl and can't wait to get back on her. Don't think I will be galloping for awhile though
         
        12-04-2007, 03:34 PM
      #3
    Yearling
    Thats scary, Lessons need to be learned though, sometimes through the hard way. I would recommend Pat Parelli. Just start with these seven games. Heres an article.

    http://www.todayshorse.com/Articles/...geofHorses.htm
         
        12-05-2007, 09:44 PM
      #4
    Foal
    I know exactly how you feel, I have had that feeling before. Its good to know you are alright though.... Falling is the worst feeling, especially when you feel yourself slipping and know you will go off. Just a bad feeling ( shivering as I think about it)
         
        12-06-2007, 03:04 PM
      #5
    Foal
    I have no advice, but rest up and heal well.
    I hope you feeling better soon and back in the saddle.
    All the best of luck!
         
        12-07-2007, 12:19 AM
      #6
    Weanling
    I'm glad to hear that you're going to be ok. When first backing a horse IMO it should always be done in an enclosed area. When we start horses, after all the groundwork is done, we always back in the roundpen. Then, after several non evental rides, (at the walk) we go to the arena and ride there. (at a walk) Once we know that the horse has the walk, turn and whoa down, then they are moved up to a trot. We also work with other horses in the arena. We will do things like walk past them, then trot up from behind them and once they are comfortable with that, another horse is loped around them. They will not be moved up to a trot or lope until they are comfortable with all of this. The first trot and lope is done in the round pen also. You want them to get used to the movement with a rider on them, without giving them the room to panic and all out run and buck. Sure, they can buck and throw you in a roundpen or arena, but If you've done all of your homework and gone slowly with them, the likeliness of it happening decreases.

    After they can walk, trot, and lope in the arena, they are ponied out on the trail a few times. It is always with calm, experienced horses and experienced riders. After ponying, then they can go out on the trails with the same calm, experienced horses.

    IMO (and I'm not saying you did this) too many people push their horses to go to fast in their training. (by fast, I don't mean speed, I mean pushing their abilities, both mentally and physically.) The slower the better.
         
        12-07-2007, 10:35 AM
      #7
    Foal
    Wow! What an experience - I'm glad to hear that you're okay. And you've got the right attitude and approach now. I also took a nasty spill two months ago and couldn't ride for awhile, and I was scared to get back on. Mine was from my 3 yr old, who spooked while I was mounting and I was half on/half off, and I've been riding for many years.

    Anyway, I immediately hired a trainer to take him through the Parelli groundwork (we'd done a little bit of it, but she is much more experienced than me) and she worked with him a lot more consistently and desensitized him. Now I can stand on the mounting block and he'll come to me. It's a hard lesson to learn, but it's important to realized what you are capable of and what you might need some help on.

    Good luck healing up and with your continued horse journey
         

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