Young horse - Page 3
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Young horse

This is a discussion on Young horse within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

    Like Tree11Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        01-30-2013, 04:02 PM
      #21
    Green Broke
    You don't really have the ability to train a horse, if you are letting her get her head down and you can't get it back up.

    And you should be able to manipulate a crop and reins at the same time for that matter. That you can't tells me that you are in over your head here.

    This horse has your number, and you are only going to get hurt if you continue with this.
    BornToRun likes this.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        01-30-2013, 09:08 PM
      #22
    Foal
    I think I know how to deal with My own horse. I asked for advice on her rolling, not to be belittled. Now if you would have read the rest of my post you will see, that she was doing good. Because someone gave me the advice. Now thank you everyone for your advice.
         
        01-30-2013, 09:35 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    Palomine---I think you got her number!!!
         
        01-30-2013, 09:47 PM
      #24
    Weanling
    Sassy, takes some good advice. You are not ready to be training horses by yourself. Get some help, a lot of help, before you get hurt seriously. Everything you have said indicates you need to be an understudy to a professional trainer.

    Do Not be so set on doing it yourself that you get hurt seriously. You've said you know your horse, but all of the actions you've mentioned her, say you'd like to know your horse, but really don't.

    We are not belittling you, just trying to stop an accident from happening.
         
        01-31-2013, 06:30 PM
      #25
    Foal
    I am talking to a trainer in like 30 mins. We were doing just fine. It is just because we got to a point in our training that I need someone to Mentor me through. Now she has not rolled, so she is out of that.
         
        01-31-2013, 07:54 PM
      #26
    Weanling
    I am going to throw in my 2 cents worth here. Take it or leave it, nobody here is trying to belittle you or make you feel bad. I have trained or help train several horses and I still ask for help. Get somebody more experience or another set of eyes. Just because you have trained a few horses and it has gone well does not mean that you can train everything. If I ever get to a point where a horse is doing something and I am not sure how to fix it or work through it I call somebody. Nobody here was trying to hurt your feelings or say that you can't train just that in this particular problem it seems like you need help.
         
        02-02-2013, 12:14 AM
      #27
    Weanling
    I just have to put in my two-cents worth...so take it for what it's worth.

    Nothing you have said sounds to me like your horse is doing anything dangerous, or that you can't handle it. In fact, I'm wondering if this horse is the one in your avatar.

    If so, this horse will be a piece of cake to break. You just have a little bit of a spoiled brat syndrome going on. However, just like a kid, it can start out pretty innocent, but can get out of hand in a hurry if you don't correct it quickly.

    You are going to have to train her with a saddle and a bridle. Just accept that. You are not going to train her, with any precision, bareback with a halter. There may be folks who can, but they get paid thousands of dollars to do that. You're not in that class...neither am I. Train her first, then ride her bareback all you want!

    You have to be able to control her head with authority. That starts in a halter and lots of ground work. Then you bridle her with a bit (I like to start in a simple O-ring snaffle). Then you saddle her up and do more ground work (I actually like to saddle first, then bridle). Then, when all that is going well, you step into the saddle. That's where this horse will be a piece of cake, compared to others I have known. Now you start doing from the saddle what you trained her to do in the ground work. This process will take months, not days or weeks, to do it well.

    I also recommend the use of spurs. When properly used, they seem to greatly enhance the horse's ability to learn and retain training, and seems to make them much more willing to comply with simple cues. Seldom do they need to be used roughly if they are introduced early in the training, before bad habits develop.

    Now, after you have done all the above, and she decides to lay down and roll on you, a few good jabs in the ribs with the spurs will break that habit very quickly. When she tries to lower her head, you take her head to the side and don't let her get "the bit in her teeth", so to speak.

    It all starts with ground training. That's where the beginners always skimp, because they are anxious to get on the animal's back and declare it "broke".

    Remember, a lot of folks trying to help you here are basing their answers on their experience as show riders and trainers. You are not going to make a blue-ribbon show horse out of this one without help from a pro (or at least a very good) trainer, as has been suggested.

    However, there is absolutely no reason why you can't make her into a good, reliable pleasure riding horse.
    Mochachino likes this.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Getting a Young Horse? DoubleS Horse Talk 5 06-17-2012 11:19 PM
    Bit for a young horse? lovemygaitedbabies Horse Tack and Equipment 3 07-12-2011 05:18 PM
    Young Rider, Young horse Cowboy Ken Horse Videos 14 11-08-2010 12:00 PM
    Young horse ericka Horse Training 8 09-11-2010 04:44 AM
    young horse? Aliboo Horse Training 7 04-15-2009 06:29 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:59 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0