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Is your horse Handy or just useful?

This is a discussion on Is your horse Handy or just useful? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        11-16-2009, 04:05 PM
      #11
    Showing
    Good post Kevin.

    My new guy, Hollywood, came to me useful. I've only had him for a few weeks and we are working on handy. Unfortunately I no longer have access to cattle but I can now throw a rope off him and ground tie him to clear a trail. We are working on gates. Not having the ability to ride every day slows things down for me.
         
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        11-16-2009, 04:08 PM
      #12
    Started
    I think people who get horses handy, are/ or get lazy. They don't take the time to teach the horse themselves.
         
        11-16-2009, 04:38 PM
      #13
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iridehorses    
    Good post Kevin.

    My new guy, Hollywood, came to me useful. I've only had him for a few weeks and we are working on handy. Unfortunately I no longer have access to cattle but I can now throw a rope off him and ground tie him to clear a trail. We are working on gates. Not having the ability to ride every day slows things down for me.
    Big ditto to this. I like college, but only seeing my boy on weekends and rapidly losing my weekend rides to weather and homework is getting old fast, ha ha.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sillybunny11486    
    I think people who get horses handy, are/ or get lazy. They don't take the time to teach the horse themselves.
    I like putting a finish on my horses myself. I'm no bronc rider or colt starter, nor do I have delusions of grandeur in that department, but I like to get broke horses and give them some education. Scout came to me last May, underweight and basically just saddle broke. Even the saddle broke designation was iffy at the canter. He's made great strides in a few months, and I can't wait to see what next summer throws at us.

    I do like taking my self-trained (minus the saddle breaking...) horses to shows and ribboning with the people who have their trainers calling instructions over the rail. To me, to buy a handy horse (at least in the show world) seems like paying waaaaay too much for a ribbon. To me, 90% of the fun of showing my horse is the training, and competing against myself, so to speak. I can definitely see, though, buying a finished and handy horse if you have a job to do, and putting him right to work. It's like the difference in being a hobby mechanic and needing a daily driver to get to work tomorrow. I won't go to the junkyard and get something that needs work if I need to be somewhere reliably any time soon.
         
        11-16-2009, 04:49 PM
      #14
    Started
    When people buy handy horses, they (USUALLY) don't really understand the mechanics and thought behind conditioning/training of a horse. I had a trainer who would buy push button horses for kids. When their horse was lame and they have to ride someone elses, less handy horse, they didnt know what to do, sometimes it was dangerous.
         
        11-16-2009, 05:29 PM
      #15
    Showing
    Sillybunny, I agree with you up to a point. I honestly believe that a child or a beginning rider needs to have a handy, well trained horse as their first horse (and maybe the first few). That way, they can understand what a good horse is and later on, if they choose, they can learn how to make a handy horse. I feel so sorry for people who honestly have no idea what a good horse is; that the only horses they have ever been able to ride where broncy, or bolted all the time, or wouldn't stop/turn, or was just generally frustrating due to behavior. I was incredibly fortunate that I had a parent that knew what a good horse was and always made sure that I had one to ride when I was growing up. Now I know how a good horse should behave and am making progress towards learning to train good horses. I have a long way to go as far as being good at making handy horses, but I know what I can expect of them and when a horse is behaving badly.

    Ideally, a person should be able to work their way up the ladder from a good broke horse, to one more challenging, and more challenging, then maybe one that needs finishing, then one that is green broke, then one that isn't broke at all, then maybe one who has some training issues.
         
        11-16-2009, 05:34 PM
      #16
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sillybunny11486    
    I think people who get horses handy, are/ or get lazy. They don't take the time to teach the horse themselves.
    Sillybunny! That's a silly statement. Many people just don't have the time or the inclination to fine tune a horse to be handy - not necessarily lacking the skill.

    Personally, I used to enjoy starting a horse but now, I just don't. Does that mean that I shouldn't own one because I didn't do it myself? I can take a handy horse and make it better but just don't have the inclination or the proper amount of time to take a green horse and turn him into what I ultimately want.
         
        11-16-2009, 05:46 PM
      #17
    Banned
    I think "handy" means different things for different people, and its something that everyone always works towards. Why would you not want something that you have to tiptoe around and make accommodations for?

    I haven't had many opportunities to test my geldings "handiness" but I think he's going to be pretty able. If he's not I'm going to teach him to be that way, because he's 16hh and I'm 5'2", so I can't exactly afford to be jumping off of him in the middle of nowhere to open a gate.
         
        11-16-2009, 06:02 PM
      #18
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sillybunny11486    
    When people buy handy horses, they (USUALLY) don't really understand the mechanics and thought behind conditioning/training of a horse. I had a trainer who would buy push button horses for kids. When their horse was lame and they have to ride someone elses, less handy horse, they didnt know what to do, sometimes it was dangerous.

    The solution isn't to give the kid a horse that's less broke. The solution is to not let the kid ride over thier ability.
         
        11-16-2009, 06:06 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    I'm trying with everything I have in me to make my horse Handy in every aspect of the word.
         
        11-16-2009, 06:08 PM
      #20
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sillybunny11486    
    I think people who get horses handy, are/ or get lazy. They don't take the time to teach the horse themselves.
    Horses don't exist in a vacuum. You don't just say one day "hey my horse is one broke SOB" then stop training it. Even if you buy a push button horse you have to ride it in a way that will keep it push button. That takes study and work and is not done by lazy people. I make money riding the dead broke horses of people that don't realize what it takes to keep a horse sharp. They are the lazy ones but even that is better than the stupid ones that buy half broke dinks for thier kid to ride because thier pretty.
         

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