Dangers at Feed Time
 
 

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Dangers at Feed Time

This is a discussion on Dangers at Feed Time within the Horse Videos forums, part of the Horse Pictures, Videos, Artwork, and Contests category

     
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        02-14-2009, 06:00 AM
      #1
    Weanling
    Dangers at Feed Time

    I stumbled across this when I was looking at stuff on Youtube, and proceeded to watch many of his other videos and read through many of his articles on his website.
    I REALLY like this guy as a trainer, and would probably agree with 90% of what he says. So I just thought I'd share some of his stuff and see what you all think. Even if it's not really relevant or helpful to you, it's still interesting. It certainly made me think.
    Some of you may not agree with what he says or his methods, but having read and seen what I have of his stuff I truly believe he has the best interests of the horse at heart and is trying to help horses and owners alike.
    I will post more later.

    Anyways, this is one that I really liked and made me change the way I feed my horse.

         
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        02-15-2009, 03:30 AM
      #2
    Started
    I like this guy's no-nonsense approach, but some of what he says is a little over the top... I dunno. I agree a good pop on the bum can really solve a few bratty issues better than anything else, and it is important to be given your space when feeding.
         
        02-15-2009, 04:28 AM
      #3
    Yearling
    Yes, I like his approach and I don't look at feeding time the same way now...
         
        02-15-2009, 05:26 AM
      #4
    Showing
    I don't think he is over the top at all. There was a lady at a local barn kicked in the head 2 years ago who ended up being air lifted and was in a coma for a couple weeks, she even lost an eye. I think that video was great.

    If you think that's over the top, you would not want to see how I handle Cobalt. Since I have owned him I have been very firm, not mean but firm. My rule with horses is that they spend 23 hours of their day being free to do what they choose so that hour that I spend with him, he will do doing what I ask of him which is actually very little. He is already quite large, even as a baby he was already of a good size so to me good ground manners and respect of my space is extremely important.

    At the shy age of 2, I would trust Cobalt with even the most novice handler.
         
        02-15-2009, 05:55 AM
      #5
    Weanling
    He is very black and white, and to some people a little strict, but if you look at his videos, all the horses he has worked with respect him, but aren't afraid of him, rather they seem to really like him. That says a lot to me.
    I'll wait for a few more replies and then post the follow up video, of what this gelding was like after having this guy work with him.
         
        02-15-2009, 07:24 AM
      #6
    Showing
    I watched his feeding video some time ago. It was right after I took a brain buzzing kick in the leg from one of my 2 year olds at feeding time. I was feeding everyone (4 horses) in one large lot, in pans on the ground. Really dumb plan if anyone else is doing it.
    Anyway I started going in with a whip and not letting anyone eat till I was ready and it worked great. I also let them eat in peace, its their time not time for grooming pets or any people related stuff.
         
        02-15-2009, 11:23 AM
      #7
    Foal
    There are better ways to earn your horses respect than thru fear and intimidation. Unfortunately for the horse, he will always fear the the bullwhip and anything else that looks like it.
         
        02-15-2009, 11:58 AM
      #8
    Weanling
    I don't think he is over the top or abusive at all. A pushy horse could do alot of damage at feeding time.
         
        02-15-2009, 02:12 PM
      #9
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Langraefin    
    There are better ways to earn your horses respect than thru fear and intimidation. Unfortunately for the horse, he will always fear the the bullwhip and anything else that looks like it.
    How is that different than using a crop while riding? I don't want this to turn into an argument but why should the horse be afraid? He wasn't repeatedly hit with it, or abuse in any way shape or form. He got into the handler's face and I'm sure he knew how he was handling himself with him, he even gave him a little attitude when he turned around!

    There is a place and time for everything including the use of whip for a horse that doesn't respect your space.

    What else would YOU have done in this situation? Not asking for fight merely clarification to your comment :)
         
        02-17-2009, 05:14 AM
      #10
    Weanling
    The follow-up, a couple of weeks later.

         

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