Have Saddle, Will Travel: A Video Q&A Series on Training and Horsemanship!
 
 

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Have Saddle, Will Travel: A Video Q&A Series on Training and Horsemanship!

This is a discussion on Have Saddle, Will Travel: A Video Q&A Series on Training and Horsemanship! within the Horse Videos forums, part of the Horse Pictures, Videos, Artwork, and Contests category

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        05-07-2013, 10:52 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    Have Saddle, Will Travel: A Video Q&A Series on Training and Horsemanship!

    Hey guys!

    Thanks for clicking on this thread and for your interest in this new thing I'm trying out! Last night I was talking with some friends and proposing the idea of doing a made-for-youtube series where I take your horsemanship and training-related questions and answer them in a video. Someone (she may identify herself if she so wishes!) had a question about teaching her green horse to stand better for mounting. So today I whipped out the tripod and made this:


    I've really enjoyed being a part of the HF community over the last year and a half, and would like to give something back. So I'm offering to take on any and all questions from the members here! The topics can be on anything you want. I don't know everything, but I'm happy to share what I have learned and to point anyone who is interested in a good direction wherever my knowledge isn't as strong! Most of all I just enjoy horses, I enjoy learning more and getting better, and doing this is good practice for talking in front of a camera (tougher than I thought!)

    Thanks for watching, and I will address any and all questions and comments! :) -Ian
         
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        05-08-2013, 08:53 PM
      #2
    Yearling

    New video here! Just shot today, I'm riding Maya around and working on some basics/fundamentals of hindquarter control. This was inspired by my friend [name removed unless she wishes to identify herself!] who was telling me last night about a horse she and her husband have. This horse is very nice and well-behaved in nearly every circumstance, with one exception: When the husband rides him, he tends to want to charge/run when going up hills and forget about listening to his rider. I told her that this is pretty normal; a lot of horses are inclined to want to speed up on an incline. After suggesting a couple of ideas that they might try pertaining to their individual situation I decided to make this video which is on the subject of building in basic control and what we call in the west a 'handle' on a horse so that they learn to listen more to the rider's cues and anticipate/think ahead of the rider less. Again this is off-the-cuff, I have no prepared speech during this session but am just riding around with a general idea in mind of what I'm trying to accomplish and narrating as I go along. I appreciate anyone who takes the time out of their day to watch these and give their feedback so much, and will address any questions/comments to the best of my ability! Thank you! :) -Ian
    waresbear likes this.
         
        05-08-2013, 09:33 PM
      #3
    Trained
    Thank Ian, saved it to my favs for him to watch, right on!
    Ian McDonald likes this.
         
        05-11-2013, 06:02 PM
      #4
    Foal
    Why can't you live in Kansas?! By the way.. are you wearing converse? If so, you just exploded my scale of awesomeness.

    I think I can definitely do this, my next question.. How do you then take control of the forequarters?
    Ian McDonald likes this.
         
        05-11-2013, 10:53 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    Ian! Thank you SO much for this video. It made me kinda giddy to be mentioned and to have Holly mentioned! I loved your idea of getting her to think "backing" instead of the urge to move out forward. I think I will apply that and see how she responds to it. I will definitely keep you updated on our progress! <3
    Ian McDonald likes this.
         
        05-12-2013, 12:59 AM
      #6
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by HighonEquine    
    Why can't you live in Kansas?! By the way.. are you wearing converse? If so, you just exploded my scale of awesomeness.

    I think I can definitely do this, my next question.. How do you then take control of the forequarters?
    I am wearing Converse. Converse are the white man's moccasins.

    RE: The front quarters..Imma have to get back to you on that one lol. That's one that can get pretty involved to explain but it has its beginnings in some simpler exercises that I'll be going into next. Glad you liked it!
    plomme likes this.
         
        05-12-2013, 01:02 AM
      #7
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ThirteenAcres    
    Ian! Thank you SO much for this video. It made me kinda giddy to be mentioned and to have Holly mentioned! I loved your idea of getting her to think "backing" instead of the urge to move out forward. I think I will apply that and see how she responds to it. I will definitely keep you updated on our progress! <3
    NP Tori! I could've left your name in there but didn't want to presume. Yeah backing can be useful in this situation, but even moreso than that what I'm trying to get across to her is "wait for me". So if she's too much thinking forward I might back her, but then again if she's falling backward I might bring her forward. I just correct whichever thing is happening too much until she starts to think "stand still".
         
        05-15-2013, 09:24 PM
      #8
    Yearling
    Rider Exercise - Ginger Round Pen Ride


    This can be done in a round pen, fenced arena or outdoors if you have enough room and appropriate footing to recover should things go haywire. To gallop a horse completely free of being guided by the reins is a good way to improve your riding as well as the horse's certainty that you can ride them wherever they go, however fast they get there. The way they feel through their whole body can improve from doing this. There's a catch though, and that is that you REALLY HAVE TO DROP THE REINS. I know it sounds crazy, buuut If you run a horse and they're surging ahead of your hands because you're pulling on the reins, you're doing exactly what the jockeys do: helping to keep them engaged. And chances are, they'll just be faster tomorrow.

    In a round pen you can even do it with nothing on their head. I put the hackamore on just in case an opportunity arose to use it, which it did right near the end. This little exercise where I'm holding her head around, I'm' waiting for her to step her inside hind foot in front of her outside hind foot (as in a one-rein stop). By releasing for the movement of her foot, I'm hooking the rein TO her foot. I'm creating a conditioned response, a neurological pathway, between the rein and the foot so that later when I'm riding around, maybe she'll steer a little better! The more I learn, the more I'm realizing how much hindquarter control matters to pretty much everything we're trying to teach these things.

    Couple of cautionary notes:

    1. The reata (rope) should be handled with the same accordance of respect as one would a firearm, as both can get you killed. Until you can handle that thing in your sleep (literally, with your eyes closed) you might exercise extreme reluctance to copy what I did here with the rope. Start on the ground, roping things that don't move, and with a breakaway honda!

    2. It's good to do a bit of riding the horse without guiding it, but one thing you want to be aware of in the round pen is that as she looks around to things outside she's traveling around counter-bent as a result. Which they need to learn to do anyway, but go easy on it. Do a little of this and a lot of walking in circles and straight lines making sure they're correct or dropping the shoulder is going to become a habit!

    3. When you run a horse, if they haven't been exposed to it much and you're not guiding them either then their self-preservation can begin to get very close to the surface. You've got to be aware of that and manage it, read your horse and know when things are edging close to the line. That line is going to be different for every person but it's a good idea to know yours and work in a way that challenges you without being overwhelming. If you can learn to ride as fast as that horse can run it will make you better but, be aware of where and when you choose to do it, do it sparingly, and again DON'T GET KILLED!
    waresbear likes this.
         
        05-15-2013, 10:19 PM
      #9
    Green Broke
    Have to watch the vids later on my phone instead of the dinosaur laptop!

    We were only a couple hours from you last week gathering and shipping yearlings, if I was thinking I should of had you come over! Geez! That could of been fun and and you could show Miss Ginger to hubby...tee he ;)
    Ian McDonald likes this.
         
        05-16-2013, 04:12 PM
      #10
    Started
    -waits patiently for her video-
         

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