His tuck is nowhere to be found, but atleast He's got Impusion - Page 2
 
 

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His tuck is nowhere to be found, but atleast He's got Impusion

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  • Increasing impusion in young horses

 
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    07-03-2010, 08:31 AM
  #11
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by A knack for horses    
When you lunge a horse, you should stay in relatively the same spot, not wandering around the pasture.

I don't know much about jumping, but I can tell that that is not the way you start a horse. When he darts between you and the jump like that, he is trying to tell you something.
That is How I tought him to lunge. When we got him he would just stand there and refuse to move, and we don't have a roundpen. So I had to use the roundpen body language with the lungeline... I guess I just never found it practical to teach him otherwise.(also I find it much easer to keep the line off the standard if im moving with him)

He darted bewteen me and the jump because the line got caught on the standerd. He was confused as to where to go because usually I back up so he has trotting room. That way we can restart our circle and he can correct his striding.
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    07-03-2010, 08:46 AM
  #12
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by dressagexlee    
I have to agree with the others. You may not be forcing him, but you are confusing him with your body language and the general set up of the whole situation.

Lunging over single fences higher than two feet can be dangerous in a circle that small. You're asking him to perform a turn into a jump that he is simply not physically capable of doing - it is better fit for an amateur stadium course.
The jump is not set up correctly - see how deep he is getting in to it? That's because he can't see how high or far away it is. It has no ground line, or even a second pole to give it any depth. See this post for more detail on how horses see fences.

My suggestion? Free-jumping him (correctly) to assess potential is great. Try setting up a chute (made of poles or even simple flag-tape) with a properly strided and set up grid, and you'll get better results. It allows them to set themselves up with little or no human interference (except for the intial "go on" shooing at the beginning), they can go in a straight line, and grids naturally help horses (and riders) to get a good rhythem and settle into a nice jump.
Here's an example of free-jumping a grid.

And remember - absolutely do not over jump him! Notice that I said to assess potential, not to train. He's three and he has plenty of growing to do still, and you'll want him to have a long and happy career by remaining nice and sound. ~
The circle's Not THAT small. In the area he is being lunged, from one side of the fence accross to the other, is 75 80 feet...

Yes I know the jump needs a socond poll, im working on finding one.

I have never overworked him, just as soon as he starts showing his disinterest in the jump is when he has one more go at it and then he's done for the day. Jumping is only a part of his exercise.

Thnx for the info, i'll work on setting something up like that.
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    07-03-2010, 09:43 AM
  #13
Foal
Well I don't know anything about training young horses or whatever but I have to say—what a lovely little pony! Very cute, and I love his coloring. Indeed he looks like he needs to snap his knees up more but that's partly due to how close he's taking off from. He'd probably have better form if he took off from further away and had to stretch out. I'd work on a lot of grids and stuff to get him snapping those knees up. :)
     
    07-03-2010, 11:18 AM
  #14
Weanling
If you lean a pole up at an angle against the inside standard it will allow the rope to slide over. I agree with the majority of commenters that he should not be jumped as much/as high until he finishes growing. Stick with poles/cavaletti and teach him to be aware and clever. He is a cutie!!
     
    07-03-2010, 01:58 PM
  #15
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyRay    
The circle's Not THAT small. In the area he is being lunged, from one side of the fence accross to the other, is 75 80 feet...

Yes I know the jump needs a socond poll, im working on finding one.

I have never overworked him, just as soon as he starts showing his disinterest in the jump is when he has one more go at it and then he's done for the day. Jumping is only a part of his exercise.

Thnx for the info, i'll work on setting something up like that.
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Yes the circle is small. It is THAT small. And he shows his disinterest in jumping from the begining. He is VERY uncomfortable and its not good for him to be jumping that height at that young of an age . If you are going to jump him don't do ANYTHING over 1'9 to 2'0 you should be doing lots of ground poles. He shouldnt even be jumping until 5 or 6. Don't rush him.
     
    07-03-2010, 02:12 PM
  #16
Green Broke
One thing you WILL accomplish by jumping him high and hard at such a young age is teaching him to hate jumping. He definitely isn't lunging properly, or he would not be leaning on that rope hard enough to pull you around at any time, which he does several times. All he's doing is flying around out of control for most of the video. If he can't control his body on the flat he certainly won't be able to do it in the air. And please put up the wiener dog when you work the horse. In the front angle vid, he nearly got run over.
     
    07-03-2010, 02:22 PM
  #17
Green Broke
As a note, the size of the jump doesn't bother me here - this horse is 3 years old, his leg joints are closed, and free jumping of ANY height isn't likely to negatively affect him (think Warmbloods). However, he could be jumping a 1'0" fence and if he's this unbalanced and landing so heavily, I would voice the same opinion.

Quite frankly, at this height, I only want to see a horse FREE jumped anyway - no lunge line. It far better allows them to judge their own distance and focus on the fence instead of a handler or line getting hung up on things. It may be fine for older and experienced horses, but unless I'm doing little crossrails, I always free jump my horses in a ring at around 3-4 years old to let them figure it out themselves.

However, as it's a LEARNING experience, I also never bother going above 2-3 feet depending on the size of the horse. I only want them to use themselves, not be at risk for getting injured or scared because of being overfaced.

This is a photo of me free jumping Zierra for the VERY first time - she had never seen a jump before this day. She is 4 years old here, and we gradually worked up to this height which is 2'9" (the highest she jumped that day). This is what a good first experience should look like - and 11 years later, Zierra still perks her ears up and gets excited when she sees a jump!

CHECKLIST:
* Properly visible jump with a ground line and a cross pole so she can judge her distance
* Properly made chute to guide her easily into the path of the jump
* Proper leg protection for a young horse who may make mistakes
* Being allowed to set her own pace through the chute and decide for herself how to handle
obstacle.


     
    07-03-2010, 05:04 PM
  #18
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by A knack for horses    
When you lunge a horse, you should stay in relatively the same spot, not wandering around the pasture.
This isn't directly related, but I disagree with this. It is more engaging for the horse to be moved about when lunging. That way they have to follow you, focus on you in a slightly different place, and have an opportunity to go in straight lines. The key here is that you are the one deciding where to go, the horse shouldn't be dragging you around.
     
    07-03-2010, 05:12 PM
  #19
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by roro    
This isn't directly related, but I disagree with this. It is more engaging for the horse to be moved about when lunging. That way they have to follow you, focus on you in a slightly different place, and have an opportunity to go in straight lines. The key here is that you are the one deciding where to go, the horse shouldn't be dragging you around.
Yes. With Otis, I like to make a triangle with his shoulder, hip, and then me facing his barrel. When I line up with his shoulder, he speeds up, and slows down when I line up with his hip. We also go in circles or straight lines around the working area. I can actually make him extend the trot by running beside him down the arena wall. Some people even do through things like simple dressage tests with their horses in spacious arenas. It's really quite awesome, this body language thing.
     
    07-03-2010, 05:23 PM
  #20
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj    
As a note, the size of the jump doesn't bother me here - this horse is 3 years old, his leg joints are closed, and free jumping of ANY height isn't likely to negatively affect him (think Warmbloods). However, he could be jumping a 1'0" fence and if he's this unbalanced and landing so heavily, I would voice the same opinion.

Quite frankly, at this height, I only want to see a horse FREE jumped anyway - no lunge line. It far better allows them to judge their own distance and focus on the fence instead of a handler or line getting hung up on things. It may be fine for older and experienced horses, but unless I'm doing little crossrails, I always free jump my horses in a ring at around 3-4 years old to let them figure it out themselves.

However, as it's a LEARNING experience, I also never bother going above 2-3 feet depending on the size of the horse. I only want them to use themselves, not be at risk for getting injured or scared because of being overfaced.

This is a photo of me free jumping Zierra for the VERY first time - she had never seen a jump before this day. She is 4 years old here, and we gradually worked up to this height which is 2'9" (the highest she jumped that day). This is what a good first experience should look like - and 11 years later, Zierra still perks her ears up and gets excited when she sees a jump!

CHECKLIST:
* Properly visible jump with a ground line and a cross pole so she can judge her distance
* Properly made chute to guide her easily into the path of the jump
* Proper leg protection for a young horse who may make mistakes
* Being allowed to set her own pace through the chute and decide for herself how to handle
obstacle.


sooo, if i'm reading this right: You want him to do gridwork? Why didnt you just say so?
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