Lunging session - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 20 Old 10-21-2013, 11:20 AM Thread Starter
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Lunging session

Here is our video working on the lunge, it is the first part of the session, basically the warm up.
He was acting out when I was not asking anything, or did not want to ask anything. At first he panics from the whip, but I put it down and finished the session with just voice and body commands, and little help of the end of the rope.
Grand's workout. - YouTube

I have no idea why AGAIN, HF does not want to embed my video, but I guess anyone can follow the link :)

He has faults, I have faults, but we are both work in progress. He gives me enough to think about, and I hope I give him enough too.

ETA - Forgot to say I love how I managed to combine the song with the video, and just at the beginning Grand starts being all "go go go" Macklemore says "let's go" Good match with lyrics I think

Last edited by Cherrij; 10-21-2013 at 11:25 AM. Reason: forgot to add
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post #2 of 20 Old 10-22-2013, 05:41 AM Thread Starter
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post #3 of 20 Old 10-22-2013, 06:17 AM
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He is certainly full of energy. My computer crashed after about two minutes so I did not see the entire thing. From what I did see I would like to suggest instead of shaking the rope, and pulling his head to try and slow him down do lots of changes of direction. Don't let him go more then two or three circles and then change direction. The goal of lunging should be to get them thinking, and changing direction a lot gets their brain turned on and tuned into you. He is ignoring your requests, if you ask him for a direction change he has to pay attention. He is a very pretty horse.
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post #4 of 20 Old 10-22-2013, 06:31 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by gssw5 View Post
He is certainly full of energy. My computer crashed after about two minutes so I did not see the entire thing. From what I did see I would like to suggest instead of shaking the rope, and pulling his head to try and slow him down do lots of changes of direction. Don't let him go more then two or three circles and then change direction. The goal of lunging should be to get them thinking, and changing direction a lot gets their brain turned on and tuned into you. He is ignoring your requests, if you ask him for a direction change he has to pay attention. He is a very pretty horse.
I am trying to change directions often, but I also want him to calm down on a circle, manage to do 1-2 circles with calm trot, then change to the other hand. We also have trouble changing directions as you can see, which I think mainly is because he does not understand me clearly yet, and the fact he is blind on the right eye.
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post #5 of 20 Old 10-22-2013, 08:21 AM
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I wish Jasper was that energetic on the lunge line! One thing I find helpful; if the horse tends to pull on the line put more pressure then at the slightest sign of him giving to it, release and give him more line. Just thought I'd throw it out their since I find it helpful :)
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post #6 of 20 Old 10-22-2013, 09:27 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by WhyAHorseOfCourse View Post
I wish Jasper was that energetic on the lunge line! One thing I find helpful; if the horse tends to pull on the line put more pressure then at the slightest sign of him giving to it, release and give him more line. Just thought I'd throw it out their since I find it helpful :)
Generally he is a very quiet, calm, slow horse. Occasionally runs like mad on the field with his buddy. On the lunge, he wakes up a little. Might still be that he is very unsure with all this etc.

I will definitely think more about releasing the pressure when he gives to it. I try, but of course I am nowhere near perfect, and I actually have more of a problem how to send him out on the blind side, when he just decides to cut in, because I cannot always react fast enough to collect a few feet of rope that he is trying to run into..
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post #7 of 20 Old 10-22-2013, 12:02 PM
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Also, try to stand a bit more stationary. That should solve some of your issues!

He sure is lovely. I enjoyed watching the vid!

The sensitivity of the internet baffles me.
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post #8 of 20 Old 10-22-2013, 12:36 PM
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I don't think standing stationary is all that required. I usually circle WITH the horse, though in a tiny circle. You can move off to one side. In fact, sometimes if I am lunging (free lunging in a round pen), if the horse is looking outside , away from me, I might just edge my body back toward his rear. Not straight toward him but in an arc, as if I am going to walk out and behind him. He will turn an ear and an eye back toward me, and as soon as he does, I shift and begin circleing with him again. It's a way of getting his mind on you.

The shaking of the rope should always get some kind of response. So, if you shake the rope a lot, and he does nothing, and then you stop shaking it, you increasingly make him desensitized to that. IF you shake the rope, you MUST get a change. If he does not slow down, then make him stop and face you. You could not get a response from him because he was tuning you out, so you must get his full attention (him facing you, eyes (eye) on you) THEN direct him.

He looks much stiffer going left and even the tiniest hint of being off, which I know you had some concerns about. But, he canters nicely on the lunge, so you know he can do it.

When yoiu are leading him out to lunge, be sure that he is respectful of your space. And when you start him, don't back away from him to get him going out there; make him move off of you, out on the circle and then walk on forward. It's important to never back up .
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Last edited by tinyliny; 10-22-2013 at 12:39 PM.
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post #9 of 20 Old 10-22-2013, 12:58 PM
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Few things I saw that would help with the longeing.
You are not giving clear signals with your arms while longeing and when changing directions. The lead part of rope when going left should be in the left hand, arm out and up a bit when frist starting the push end of rope in right hand to twirl or throw at hip. Switch rope when changing directions. At times had rope in wrong hands which led to some confusion. Also angle body towards hip, look at hip to send the horse off, not looking facing shoulder or face. Will help a lot in changing directions. Pivot your feet, at times you were walking in too big of circles yourself. Scratch a 3foot circle in the dirt and keep your feet in the circle.
Also change directions 10 times more than what you did. To change directions he has to stop or at least slow his feet to change which puts you more in control of feet which in turn controls his mind of paying attention to you. To expect him to walk 1 or 2 circles before changing directions when full of energy is expecting too much...at least at this stage of longeing he looks to be in. Change direction every 3 or 4 circles will slow him down a bit after 5 or 6 times. The more you change the more attentive he will be to you.
Because of the music, couldnt tell if you were giving some kind of audible command the times he did walk or slow down. Don't let him change his speed himself even if it is faster than what you are wanting at the time...you control the speed. Speed him up even faster than he was going and changing directions...he will be glad to slow after 4 or 5 minutes. Also put some complete stops in the routine...sometimes going the same way, sometimes changing directions. .when starting back up. He gets more time of longeing on him then you can expect a walk when first starting out longeing.
Longeing is as much of a skill as riding, it takes practice and concentration on yourself as much as the horse. All the little things makes a big difference to the horse and the outcome. The blind eye may hinder abit but not that much.
Hope this give you some things to consider to help out.
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post #10 of 20 Old 10-22-2013, 02:18 PM
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Watching a second time...another thing that would help...dont use the full length of the line. Cut it down to around 10feet. Let out more as you get better control from him.
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