Buying a "perfect horse" or learn how to polish one up?
 
 

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Buying a "perfect horse" or learn how to polish one up?

This is a discussion on Buying a "perfect horse" or learn how to polish one up? within the Horses for Sale forums, part of the Horse Resources category
  • Buying a horse in poland

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  • 1 Post By Island Horselover
  • 1 Post By soenjer55
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    05-31-2013, 04:17 PM
  #1
Foal
Buying a "perfect horse" or learn how to polish one up?

So I have a question out there for all of you horse buyers. When looking for a horse, do you search for the perfect dream horse that you can just saddle up and go? The one that hardly spooks, bucks, no vices, all around friendly easy going horse? Granted some of these well trained horses are hard to find and come at a hefty price, are you willing to pay it? Or would you rather buy a horse that still needs work, isnt finished, has issues spooking etc. and put in the work it takes to train him? We all have heard the saying that just because you own a great horse doesn't make you a great rider. Do you feel confident in your abilities to take on a more difficult horse even though it comes with risks? Or would you rather lower your chances of getting hurt with a more safe horse but miss out on the opportunity to grow as a rider/trainer? I have been pondering this in my mind today and just thought I'd ask you guys!!
     
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    05-31-2013, 04:25 PM
  #2
Weanling
I would def. Go for the green or unbroke and untrained horse as I am a trainer myself and I love the challange :0) Most of my horses have not been handled before they came to us and they are all great now and excatly the way I want them to be :0)
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    05-31-2013, 04:44 PM
  #3
Yearling
There's nothing wrong with either option, and it depends completely on the person. But, for me, I've always liked the ones that need polishing. I know that I can handle it, and I enjoy the experience. Eventually, when I start showing, I want to get serious with it and that will probably make a "perfect" horse necessary, but that won't be too soon.
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    05-31-2013, 05:12 PM
  #4
Trained
Of course if I am paying big bucks, I expect the training to fit the price tag. With a green horse, I don't expect them to know everything but what they do know better be what I consider correct, retraining schmutzy trained behaviors can be difficult and it annoys me. However if the horse is everything else I am looking for such as conformation, breeding, etc., I will overlook the inferior start it has, not to save money but to get the horse I want. When I am retired, I fully expect to pay top dollar to get my trained, perfect Arab show horse, I won't be looking to save money, I want a perfect horse to enjoy & I will pay to get it.
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    05-31-2013, 08:41 PM
  #5
Foal
Thanks for the input! I am not looking to buy a horse anytime soon, but I came across a descriptive ad for a nice Tennessee Walker that fits everything I want in a horse. However, it is still an internet ad and I wouldnt buy without seeing him in person, but if the horse did live up to the description he would be a dream. But then I started thinking, "If this horse is as good as they say he is, what is there for me to learn? How will I grow as a rider?" I learned a lot from the colt I raised and broke, I would say I got him 85% of the way there, now he is at a trainer because I felt like we were running into problems that I wasnt skilled enough to handle, so rather then accidentally make things worse, I handed him over to someone else. Anyways... I was just curious to hear what others though :)
     
    05-31-2013, 08:53 PM
  #6
Showing
Personally, I prefer to buy one completely unhandled or, at the very most, halter broke. That way, I don't have to deal with someone else's screw ups. I like to start with a blank slate.

However, I have the ability to take a horse from unhandled to finished and I'm extremely picky about how my horses ride/handle. I don't tend to like the feel of horse's ridden/trained by anyone else.
     
    05-31-2013, 09:35 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
Personally, I prefer to buy one completely unhandled or, at the very most, halter broke. That way, I don't have to deal with someone else's screw ups. I like to start with a blank slate.

However, I have the ability to take a horse from unhandled to finished and I'm extremely picky about how my horses ride/handle. I don't tend to like the feel of horse's ridden/trained by anyone else.

Much respect to you!!
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