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Dreaming of the future, with a bit of worrying. Experience with OTTBs Please

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        04-17-2013, 09:26 AM
      #11
    Yearling
    OTTB's are BEYOND faithful. They, in my opinion, are the most willing/brave/trusting of any horse out there. You will NOT be sorry if you adopt/purchase one. But don't sell yourself short off of only going for looks or the best race pedigree. You will not find your OTTB, he will find you :)
         
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        04-17-2013, 06:26 PM
      #12
    Foal
    I've found that thoroughbreds have just always been my favorite breed of horse. All of my favorite horses through the years of taking lessons and leasing were thoroughbreds, and most times I didn't find that out until after they were my favorite. So it seems to me that thoroughbreds are just my breed, I'm automatically attracted to them. The horse in my avatar is one of my favorites horses ever, he was the one that I would lease every summer at my first barn. His name was Ziggy (aka Cinnamon Stick, which was his show name, I don't know what his racing name was) he was about 7 or 8 in this picture and I was about 14, its old but one of my favorites.
         
        04-17-2013, 06:42 PM
      #13
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ThoroughbredJumper    
    It is CRUCICAL you do not get too nervous on an OTTB. They feel energy very easy.. Calm is key. Sit up straight, and be patient with them as they are not fast learners.
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    I want to disagree with this last statement. I just recently bought an OTTB with little training and she's understanding leg and seat cues within maybe 2 hours of working on them. She learned to drop her head within one ride because I wasn't going to yank on her mouth. Her kicking is a rare occurance within a month, she hasn't bit more than once.

    She calmed down tied and dropped her head within 3 days of tying. And she went from running away from me in the pasture to either walking to me or waiting for me within a week.

    Majority of OTTBs are NOT slow learners, I believe them to be (majority, not just mine) very fast learners.


    As long as you have the experience to possibly fix tying, kicking, etc issues that the horse may have, I'd say to go for an OTTB. This mare is my first and I've fallen in love with them.

    I also bought the mare under note that she was a very hard keeper and they had her on free choice hay and 5-8lbs of racing horse feed. I took her off the grain and stuck her out to pasture with free choice hay. She's gaining like a monster. She's going to look like a QH aside from her knees and face when she finishes filling out.
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        04-21-2013, 12:58 PM
      #14
    Foal
    I just bought an OTTB of the track that I found on the canter website. #1 CANTER for the most part its just a service to list horses that the trainers on the track want to sell. This is not an adoption, this is a purchase from the current owner. #2 Most trainers, especially with horses on the track will not let you ride the horse. You will have to trust your judgement on the movement and attitude of the horse in hand. I brought a trainer, who had a better eye with movement, with me to help evaluate the horses I was looking at. #3 I would bring a trainer with you. It will help keep you on task, when I went to the track I saw over 30 horses that were for sale, you need to keep focused because by the end of the day you might fall in love with half of them. #4 Write up a list of must haves, like temperament, conformation, hoof health. Nice to have, like some training out side of racing, let down already..etc This will keep you on task. Take pictures when you go, I noticed that the pictures on the canter site were not true to what the horse really looks like in person...so a horse that you are not sure you like might be much nicer looking in person. The horse that I ended up buying looked awful in the picture but face to face he was wonderful. There will always be something that you will not like about a horse on the track so you need to decide what problem you can over look or not deal with. I knew that I did not want a stall weaver or a cribber, just don't like them. I hope this helps a little bit. Oh last thing, the prices are negotiable, most of the trainers really want to find a good home for their horses so the price they list the horse for most like can be negotiated down.
         
        07-18-2013, 10:03 PM
      #15
    Foal
    I just bought an OTTB, I haven't even picked her up yet. I was told she raced and one once, so not sure how long she raced but probably not that long if she only won a single race. She's 14 now and hasn't had anyone on her back since she last raced. I've broke probably 50 quarter horses (I just turned 22) I break them western but I ride english a lot (I have a couple thoroughbreds now just not ones off the track) and am hoping to turn this mare into a jumper. I have a small roundpen to work in, then big open spaces. Does anyone have any advice for my first ride in big open spaces? I was talking to someone today who used to exercise thoroughbreds at the track and he said you can yank on the reins all you want but that won't slow them down. Not that I yank on the reins anyway, I'm just wondering how to slow a thoroughbred down that thinks its in a race. Also, we have a lot of wildlife in my area. There are deer and moose and bear everywhere to spook a horse, and you have to ride past a field of buffalo to get down the driveway of the farm and they stampede every time they see a horse and go crashing through the bush and it sounds like an earthquake. So the first few rides could be interesting. If I srart her like a colt, as if she never had a rider on her back would that work? Will she be as flighty after being off the track for years? Any advice would be much appreciated!
         

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