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Which one would you buy?

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        05-02-2013, 10:50 PM
      #21
    Weanling
    I also don't care for Dood's neck development, at 12 years old. His photos come across as him being a confident, bold horse... Perhaps a little settled in his opinion of things. The other two seem gentler and softer, somehow.

    That said, they want double the training fee of our going rate, around here. $1800 for 4 weeks?? Yikes! That'd better be one solid horse. I'd expect that they'd have brought them further in the past year they've had them, if they expect that much progress in a month. Jmo. ...or is the $1800 purchase + training?

    Sigh... I do like me a sexy looking drafty type!
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        05-02-2013, 11:10 PM
      #22
    Weanling
    Yeah, the training price is STEEP. My friend has worked full time at a breeding and training facility and lives nearby and basically told me if I got Vinnie or Dillon she would not allow me to let them train them onsite for those prices - and that she would take them herself for free (I pay for hay,etc) and train them with me.

    I would go through BLM, but I am in MA. There are literally NO options near me unless I want to purchase a mustang sight unseen (except pictures) and have them shipped for a couple thousand anyway.
         
        05-02-2013, 11:28 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    It's $1800 in addition to purchase price, so $2800 :( The horse does live on farm (training board, basically).
         
        05-02-2013, 11:33 PM
      #24
    Foal
    Just from the pictures, I would prefer Vinnie, but that is quite a bit of money for a horse with that little training. Good luck in your decision.
         
        05-02-2013, 11:36 PM
      #25
    Weanling
    I agree, there are just so few options around here when considering mustangs. I know it is silly to want a specific horse breed, but I went to the mustang farm near me and worked with them for a bit and fell in love. Hard when you are a good days drive from any NATURAL wild mustangs.
    Like I said, I do have the option of purchasing and then having my friend work with me in completing their training...
         
        05-02-2013, 11:45 PM
      #26
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hemms    
    I also don't care for Dood's neck development, at 12 years old. His photos come across as him being a confident, bold horse... Perhaps a little settled in his opinion of things. The other two seem gentler and softer, somehow.

    That said, they want double the training fee of our going rate, around here. $1800 for 4 weeks?? Yikes! That'd better be one solid horse. I'd expect that they'd have brought them further in the past year they've had them, if they expect that much progress in a month. Jmo. ...or is the $1800 purchase + training?

    Sigh... I do like me a sexy looking drafty type!
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    Neck development? Can you explain?

    Sorry... I don't know much about confirmation, etc, at ALL. Been riding for 15 years and now have been trying to do as much research as I can before I purchase one!
         
        05-03-2013, 09:14 AM
      #27
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aharlov    
    jaydee - I didn't say the horses were free.

    The first two are from a mustang foundation. They were rescued a year ago and have been in training for a year to rehabilitate them. They are very sweet. I don't know if you have mustangs - but the gene for laminitis is incredibly rare, as mustangs will laminitis die off in the wild and therefore do not further along the gene. Very few mustangs EVER end up unsound. They have been grazing their entire life, since caught from the wild. These ones have amazing feet, as the mustang foundation they are with (in NH) has a barefoot specialist on site, as well as a dentist and a vet.

    The first two are available for $1000., and if I want to continue training with them on the farm after purchase, it is $1800 to work with them three times a week for 4 weeks and they nearly guarantee a trail ready 'stang. They have been doing this for a few years and have placed many horses. They were also in the movie "Wild Horse, Wild Ride," the documentary. (The farm was, not the horses for adoption).

    The last one has no abuse in his past whatsoever. I am not sure what the woman is asking at this point.
    You hadn't mentioned prices and they sounded as if they were in some sort of a rehab or rescue situation - sorry I wasn't meaning to offend. If the result is a good rounded horse at the end of the session then its not a bad price - though there are ready made horses selling for less right now - just not essentially mustangs and that seems to be what you have your heart set on
    Don't get confused with the laminitis not in mustangs thing though - its has less to with them not surviving if they get it and mostly to do with the fact that they have genetically evolved to exist on hard conditions where good food was hard to come by - much the same as the British native ponies (who also have amazing feet). You take them from that to being fed high starch/sugar feeds and lush grazing and their metabolism can't cope with it. The problem doesn't happen overnight, IRS builds up over time so it is something you should be aware of. They are categorized be research as one of the breeds that is highly susceptible to insulin related laminitis
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        05-03-2013, 09:18 AM
      #28
    Weanling
    Thanks for clarifying jaydee - that makes a lot of sense.

    Is there a way to avoid that? I am sure the owners that have them now could also give me some information. Less grazing time, more quality hay?
         
        05-03-2013, 09:23 AM
      #29
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aharlov    
    Thanks for clarifying jaydee - that makes a lot of sense.

    Is there a way to avoid that? I am sure the owners that have them now could also give me some information. Less grazing time, more quality hay?
    I'd treat them exactly the same way as I manage my easy keepers/laminitis prone horses. Plenty of exercise. Restrict grazing with either a muzzle, a starvation patch, stabling for part of the day - whatever works for your management regime. Keep away from all feeds that aren't low starch/sugar - an easy keeper needs very little - honestly even in full work I have a couple who would look fat fed on cardboard!!
    Some hays can be as high in sugar as grass so soaking helps to remove them
    Lots of laminitis advice on the forum
         
        05-03-2013, 09:47 AM
      #30
    Weanling
    This is similar to what I read in that equine magazine -

    "The care for a horse diagnosed with laminitis can be at times very frustrating. Even horses under the best possible may not respond to care and/or recover fully. This is another reason why wild Mustangs may not have a high incidence of laminitis or founder. In the wild a lame horse has a low survival rate. Horses in the wild with weaknesses tend to breed less. Domesticated horses have no such circumstances since they are controlled and cared largely by man."

    "..The more the horse goes back to a wild Mustang life, the better. Smaller meals spaced out over a period time so that the horse’s digestion is more natural."

    "Movement is also important to digestion in a horse. Horses should take a bite of food then take a step. Repeat that same process over a period of eighteen hours a day. Again the wild Mustang eats poor nutritional forage yet covers long distances each day. The domesticated horse eats very high nutritional food (grains, grasses, hay) yet often travels very little distance compared the wild Mustang. Movement helps digestion, hoof wear (naturally trimming hoof to keep the coffin bone in proper position) and blood flow (increases nutrition to the hoof)."

    (all found here: How to care for a horse with laminitis - by Matthew Brendal - Helium )
         

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