Questions about a 2nd horse - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 17 Old 07-16-2010, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Macslady View Post
I do beg to differ on the gender doesn't matter.
That is a rather blanket statement based on a single example. I regularly keep gelding and mares, mares and mares, and geldings and geldings together with no issues what so ever. That is based on 30 years of keeping horses.

I had a gelding a few years ago that absolutely could not be alone in the paddock. At the time I only had two horses and if I took the other horse for a ride, he would work himself up into a lather until I got back but if I took him for a ride, there was no tendency to be herd or barn sour. He was an extreme, but as a general rule, horses always do better with a companion - and it doesn't have to be another horse.

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post #12 of 17 Old 07-16-2010, 09:32 AM
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I think a mini would be your best option. You can usually find them pretty reasonably priced. They are super cute and can be trained to do just about anything.

As far as the gender thing goes...we've had nasty mares and geldings. It doesn't seem to much matter what goes on between their legs...more their ears. I've had a few horses in my time that loved to be alone. My heart horse would not stand for it. He was the quietest, calmest, most loving horse in the world...until you took his buddy away.
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post #13 of 17 Old 07-16-2010, 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by iridehorses View Post
I had a gelding a few years ago that absolutely could not be alone in the paddock. At the time I only had two horses and if I took the other horse for a ride, he would work himself up into a lather until I got back but if I took him for a ride, there was no tendency to be herd or barn sour. He was an extreme, but as a general rule, horses always do better with a companion - and it doesn't have to be another horse.
I've actually seen a number of horses like this...hate to be alone at home, but do fine out on the trail by themselves.

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post #14 of 17 Old 07-16-2010, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by corinowalk View Post
As far as the gender thing goes...we've had nasty mares and geldings. It doesn't seem to much matter what goes on between their legs...more their ears.

I second this. You can't judge a horse any more than a human based on gender.

Its like saying ALL guys are testosterone-driven body builders and all girls are blonde and skinny.

Lol extreme example, but you have to base it on the individual.
I also hate breed steryotypes but that is for another topic XD

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post #15 of 17 Old 07-16-2010, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Macslady View Post
Talk about studdish behavior. They couldn't take the mare out of the pen without him and her throwing a fit. They tried to get both of them past it, but it didn't work. They ended up rehoming him again. He literally broke their wood fence trying to get out and follow her.
This sounds more like a herd bound horse than one that is acting studish.

My gelding is not at all studish but he is VERY herd bound. Right now his barn mate is another gelding. Who is equally as herd bound. Just taking one or the other a few feet out in front of the barn to apply fly spray causes the one left behind to run up and down the fence line to get the best view to see where their friend is.
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post #16 of 17 Old 07-16-2010, 05:16 PM
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He was definitely studdish. When he was put back in he would immediately walk up to the mare, stamp his foot and when she turned he would drop and try to mount.

Sorry, I wasn't meaning to beat up on geldings but a lot of people have the mistaken idea that all geldings are happy docile guys since they lack testosterone. (Hope I spelled that right).
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post #17 of 17 Old 07-16-2010, 11:48 PM
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^
Well sometimes geldings still act studdy because they are proud-cut or whatever its called LOL
I admit that I know little about all that business, someone else can probably explain it better.

Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world. ~Harriet Tubman
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