what do you think he'd bring in? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

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post #21 of 37 Old 07-23-2010, 09:47 AM
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800-1200 would be my geuss. If you get some time under his belt. The 30-40 minutes to catch him is fixable. You go out in the field and you make him work. He runs from you, you let him run until he stops, you IMMEDIATELY walk to him and if he starts running you let him run until he stops, walk to him again, don't ever let him rest. When he's done, he'll turn towards you and let you catch him. It will take 30 minutes to an hour the first time or two. If you do it EVERY day, it will take less and less time each time until it takes just a minute. That's up to you to fix.

The other things are also up to you, time under his belt. If you don't want to put the time into him, then list him at 800 and take 600.

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post #22 of 37 Old 07-23-2010, 09:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by farmpony84 View Post
800-1200 would be my geuss. If you get some time under his belt. The 30-40 minutes to catch him is fixable. You go out in the field and you make him work. He runs from you, you let him run until he stops, you IMMEDIATELY walk to him and if he starts running you let him run until he stops, walk to him again, don't ever let him rest. When he's done, he'll turn towards you and let you catch him. It will take 30 minutes to an hour the first time or two. If you do it EVERY day, it will take less and less time each time until it takes just a minute. That's up to you to fix.

The other things are also up to you, time under his belt. If you don't want to put the time into him, then list him at 800 and take 600.
Haha, this is basically how I have "fixed" every hard to catch horse I have ever had. The horse chooses, the lead rope or the lunge whip. If they run from me the first time when I go to catch them, they have to keep running until I decide they can stop - it usually only takes 2-3 times of this to break the habit.


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post #23 of 37 Old 07-23-2010, 01:27 PM
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Well, I can say that if I were to go out looking to buy a horse for a child, I would not buy him for more than 200.00. I would have to spend 6 months to a year working with him on a daily basis to get him desensitized and safe.

I would try to work with him on driving. I think he would be a cute driving pony, and if that is the case he could be used by an adult.

Ponies can carry more proportionately than a light horse- he is stocky and thick, I don't see a problem with him carrying an adult rider.

Spent a whole hour today laying in a pasture, waiting for a sparkling vampire to show up. Alas, I woke up and looked over, only to find a mound of horse crap. Sigh.
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post #24 of 37 Old 07-23-2010, 05:01 PM
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If you're going to sell him, please pull/fix his mane and put a bridle that fits properly on him - also, new riding pictures with you in proper gear and without the saddle up on his neck will go a long way. The price you get for him is going to depend a lot on how you market him - just because he's not a $5000 show pony doesn't mean don't market him that way ;).
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post #25 of 37 Old 07-26-2010, 10:15 AM
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I use farmpony's method for fixing hard to catch horses, but I add in treats. If they stand and let me halter them, they get treats. I find that this works a bit quicker for really stubborn horses. Also, NOT working the horse everytime you catch him is a big deal! If every time he sees a halter he gets worked hard, he's not going to like the halter... Try haltering him one or two days a week, feeding him some treats, maybe hand-graze him outside the pasture a little, groom him lightly, and then put him back out. This will go a long way to gaining his trust, which is an improtant factor in getting him to be less spooky. He needs to trust that humans are not going to let anything "eat" him.
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post #26 of 37 Old 07-27-2010, 09:44 AM
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Around here (northeast Ohio), green ponies are listed on CL for $200-300 all the time. Don't know what they end up getting for them.
Tons of wanted ads for kid safe ponies, not anywhere near as many of those listed. I've also seen a number of ads where people list 2 and 3 year old ponies as "kid safe". In many cases I suspect that means that they lead a kid around the pony, nobody got hurt, so now it's "kid safe"
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post #27 of 37 Old 07-27-2010, 09:54 AM
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It is a sad story the way the horse market is at the moment. Just two months ago, a client of mine picked up a registered half Arabian half Saddlebred (National show horse) 15hh, 13 years old. He has a list of wins in the show ring that is a page long, a dream to ride whether it is by children or adults. He will call out to you from the paddock when he sees you coming and is waiting at the gate to be caught. Easy to catch, shoe and trailer, came fully vaccinated and with current coggins. What did she pay for him? 300 bucks. Partly because he had to be sold in a hurry but unfortunately there are others out there like him.

I hope you can get some decent money for your little boy but the market sure is tough at the moment, if you have the time to promote and sell him over a couple of months, I think you should put in a lot of extra training to ensure that not only you get a good price, but also that he goes to a good and permanent home. With a horse like that you have to be sure that whoever you sell him to is fully aware of his flaws and will be prepared to deal with them appropiately otherwise he may find himself being sold on very very quickly.

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post #28 of 37 Old 07-27-2010, 04:28 PM
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I have to agree with most on here, I just sold a 15.3hh Morgan Gelding that was 12 and kidsafe for $800. I picked up my 15hh Grulla mare for $450 delivered. A pony of that size has to be kidsafe to be able to go for anything, but it does depend on the market, how safe the pony is, and how good of a salesperson you are.
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post #29 of 37 Old 07-27-2010, 04:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahver View Post
It is a sad story the way the horse market is at the moment. Just two months ago, a client of mine picked up a registered half Arabian half Saddlebred (National show horse) 15hh, 13 years old. He has a list of wins in the show ring that is a page long, a dream to ride whether it is by children or adults. He will call out to you from the paddock when he sees you coming and is waiting at the gate to be caught. Easy to catch, shoe and trailer, came fully vaccinated and with current coggins. What did she pay for him? 300 bucks. Partly because he had to be sold in a hurry but unfortunately there are others out there like him.

I hope you can get some decent money for your little boy but the market sure is tough at the moment, if you have the time to promote and sell him over a couple of months, I think you should put in a lot of extra training to ensure that not only you get a good price, but also that he goes to a good and permanent home. With a horse like that you have to be sure that whoever you sell him to is fully aware of his flaws and will be prepared to deal with them appropiately otherwise he may find himself being sold on very very quickly.
Horses like you described is what brings down the market now. When you can buy a horse that's worth $2000 for $300 because someone let's say lost their job and can't afford them anymore that's when the market turns. When people finally start putting the right price tags on these horses is when the market can come back. But luckily these people do let them go cheap before they are starved, turned to slaughter, etc.
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post #30 of 37 Old 07-28-2010, 12:41 AM
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Ponies can usually carry adult riders very well. Heck, the Mongol warriors of old rode tiny ponies with all their weaponry and such.

My girl (in the avvie) is 13.2 hh and carries me and my sis wonderfully. She's carried 200 lb men around without really batting an eye. I'm 5'3, 135 lbs or so and no one ever tells me that I look too big on her. In fact, people often express their surprise that I actually look well proportioned to her. Part of it is thanks to her really round barrel. ^_^ It fills out my legs very well. Here's a pic of us barreling around somewhat ungracefully.


Last edited by Eolith; 07-28-2010 at 12:45 AM.
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