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Would you buy a senior horse maybe 22 years old?

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  • Is sentinel senior good to calm a horse

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    04-12-2013, 11:26 PM
  #21
Foal
Thank you guys for all of your comments. Everyone has great comments and pros and cons that I will seriously consider. I do realize that it would definitely be risk (just like purchasing any horse at any age is) and I will definitely have a good prepurchase exam etc. Actually, the horse I am thinking about is a rescue that I can foster first and take care of then I would have first choice to adopt. If/when I foster her they rescue pays for vet bills until someone adopts her even though I would be sponsoring her board and paying for her feed and providing her care. They full assess the horse for riding suitability and health needs. I do trust them and feel that by fostering her first I would get a better idea of any health issues, etc.

I am prepared in the future-- if she does not have any immediate extreme health issues that I feel I wouldn't be able to fully be able to take care of or that would be a good fit for what I am looking for--to be able to give her a retirement home. For the next several years one . Horse would be my main focus until we buy property again with acreage. For now boarding is my only option but we do plan on owning acreage when we buy our next house. I have owned a horse in the past so I do understand all that comes along with owning a horse young or old.

I appreciate everyone's opinions because I don't want to think that I was totally crazy for considering an older horse. If I do decide to foster her I am sure I will post lots of questions and concerns I have so I make the best choice for her and me.
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    04-12-2013, 11:34 PM
  #22
Started
Our old lady. I think she looks pretty good for her age.
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    04-12-2013, 11:41 PM
  #23
Showing
If you are a beginner and you can get a old well broke horse, the few years of experience and confidence building you will get will far outweigh all other issues. Many people will say "your only going to get a few years of use" but those few years will be golden.
Not saying you should get a 22 year old brood mare that's never been saddled. But if you find one that has been well ridden, and has minimal health issues, go for it.
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    04-13-2013, 01:38 AM
  #24
CCH
Weanling
Old doesn't necessarily mean broke nor does it mean calm. I'm all for an *experienced* horse especially for a beginner. That horse could be 5 to 25, but you are not likely to find that without spending some money upfront.

A foster may be a good way, as long as it is returnable if it doesn't work out. Be careful with a horse that has an unknown past and limited evaluation by a professional. A vast majority of underweight/unhealthy horses that appear docile, trained, and less spooky will experience mood changes and increased energy level as soon as they get some groceries and their health back.
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    04-14-2013, 05:49 PM
  #25
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by CCH    
Old doesn't necessarily mean broke nor does it mean calm. I'm all for an *experienced* horse especially for a beginner. That horse could be 5 to 25, but you are not likely to find that without spending some money upfront.

A foster may be a good way, as long as it is returnable if it doesn't work out. Be careful with a horse that has an unknown past and limited evaluation by a professional. A vast majority of underweight/unhealthy horses that appear docile, trained, and less spooky will experience mood changes and increased energy level as soon as they get some groceries and their health back.
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I totally agree with you on this one. I know I won't see her true personality until she is back to her healthy self.
     
    04-14-2013, 05:58 PM
  #26
Started
I bought a 22yo pony earlier this year for my daughter. Her last pony was 7, and far too clever. This aged pony is perfect for her - sensible, has seen it all and the vet/blacksmith both think she is looking pretty spritely for her age. With proper care there is no reason we wouldn't get 5 - 10 years out of her.. and they are 5 - 10 years that will benefit my kids to no end. She will teach both my kids what they need to know and give them possibly the most important thing - confidence.
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    04-14-2013, 08:06 PM
  #27
Weanling
I wouldn't hesitate to buy a horse that old, but I would also have them vetted just to be sure there aren't any major issues. I started back into horses with a 22 year old and got a ton of confidence and she moved onto a young girl just beginning who she tolerated like no other. Last year I got dumped and boy do I wish I still had her cause the confidence is way low again.
     
    04-15-2013, 05:09 AM
  #28
Green Broke
I'm on the side of no on this.

While you can find horses of that age that are still riding? You can also find nice calm horses of 5/6/7 that you would have many years with.

And unless you have unlimited funds you could well spend your money taking care of horse that has too many issues to ride safely, if at all at that age.

I also know from my aging body that things wear out and horses are more stoic about pain, discomfort than we are.

I bought my QH at 5. He has not ever put a foot wrong, (other than wanting to take off on daughter) so I took him over. He was not bolting, just cantering back to fence. Had she come back on reins, he would have responded and stopped his foolishness. I got her another horse, one that was dead head.

He is now 19 years old. Sound. And he is the same horse under saddle every time, whether he is ridden daily, or not for couple of years. Just that type horse.

To me, you would get more out of horse that is 6ish and up, than you will get out of one this old.
     
    07-03-2013, 08:00 AM
  #29
Started
My BF has a 27 year old TB. Rocket dose EVERYTHING. He dose barrels, keyhole, cows even a little dressage. And he will still do that at his age with my 240lb bf on him. Now my BF dose not work him a lot or hard, but every now and then he will school everyone in a Competition. Keeps the old man happy. Rocket dose not need any special feed or joint supplements. He's the horse that can be me left for a month then go on a 12 mile trail ride, and then want to run home lol. So the age issue depends on the horse. I have known horses to go at 16 and I have seen some live into their 30 and still be rid-able. What is important above all else is conformation. Don't get an older (or younger is you can help it) that is as long a s a bus. My friends made that mistake with a 21 year old QH its nearly impossible to find a saddle that dose not have a 4-5 inch gap between his back and the saddle.
     
    07-03-2013, 08:33 AM
  #30
Green Broke
Oops!!!
     

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