Is a young horse too risky for first purchase? - The Horse Forum

 4Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 13 Old 02-24-2013, 07:42 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 3
• Horses: 0
Is a young horse too risky for first purchase?

We are new to horses and have always been told to purchase a 10 year or older horse. We have recently purchased a trained 7 year old and have had no problems with her and she has been a great horse. We are now looking to purchase our second horse and have found a really sweet, trained 4 year old. She almost seems better behaved than our 7 year old. Do you think we are making a mistake by buying a horse this young or does it really depend on the horse?

Thank you in advance!
DeborahG01 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 Old 02-24-2013, 07:45 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Desert from Hell, CA.
Posts: 1,377
• Horses: 5
Depends on who you ask. My first horse was a weanling, probably not the best idea, but we've done alright. I guess the factors are 1) the horse as an individual and 2) whether or not you can tell if you're not doing something right before you let it fester and 3) your ability to ask for help if 2 happens

;)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jareth, the Goblin King
I move the stars for no one.
RIP Pumpkin: 2012-8/26/13
demonwolfmoon is offline  
post #3 of 13 Old 02-26-2013, 11:20 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Missouri
Posts: 3,734
• Horses: 3
The thing is this.

You are new to horses, which means many of the problems you may run into with a 4 year old you will not have the experience to either recognize before they happen, be able to fix once they start happening, and can end up not just getting yourself hurt, but the horse too.

A young horse is much more likely to have issues of trying things, than an older and well trained horse, due simply to that horse's years under saddle.

That said, I've known young horses that never offered a moment's trouble BUT I grew up around horses, and have worked with them most of my life, and that makes the difference.

Much depends on the horse, but much depends on how you handle horses. I probably would advise against it, unless you had the money to hire trainer to work with you.
smrobs and Speed Racer like this.

Horses make me a better person.
Palomine is offline  
post #4 of 13 Old 02-26-2013, 11:33 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Indiana
Posts: 2,178
• Horses: 4
You'll enjoy an older horse more. I ride a 5yr old and every now and again he can be a lil ummm, temperamental.
Posted via Mobile Device
Phly is offline  
post #5 of 13 Old 02-26-2013, 11:40 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
Posts: 22,057
• Horses: 24
I agree with Palomine. The problem with young horses being paired with inexperienced riders is that young horses simply don't have the experience. With them, there will be a lot of situations come up where the horse has never done anything like it before and they may react badly.

The reason that older horses are better is because horses that are trained and over the age of 10 have generally been a lot of places and seen a lot of things...so, they are more accepting of new things that happen without a big to-do.

Of course, it all depends on the individual horse and their temperament, but horses that are not ruined by bad handling/training generally get better and more trustworthy with age.
Speed Racer likes this.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
smrobs is offline  
post #6 of 13 Old 03-05-2013, 02:24 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 12,197
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeborahG01 View Post
We are new to horses and have always been told to purchase a 10 year or older horse. We have recently purchased a trained 7 year old and have had no problems with her and she has been a great horse. We are now looking to purchase our second horse and have found a really sweet, trained 4 year old. She almost seems better behaved than our 7 year old. Do you think we are making a mistake by buying a horse this young or does it really depend on the horse?

Thank you in advance!
It really depends on the horse. Breeding, lines and temper can be very different from one over another regardless of the age. I would suggest doing a vet check to make sure the sound passes or look into a trial as well. That can be of great benefit when you feel unsure about purchasing a younger horse.
my2geldings is offline  
post #7 of 13 Old 03-05-2013, 05:02 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,099
• Horses: 1
Though different horses have different temperaments, there is a good reason people say "green on green = black and blue"

We grow too soon old, and too late smart.
DimSum is offline  
post #8 of 13 Old 03-05-2013, 05:18 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Desert from Hell, CA.
Posts: 1,377
• Horses: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by DimSum View Post
Though different horses have different temperaments, there is a good reason people say "green on green = black and blue"
Because, statistically speaking, it is probably true.

There are people who buck the statistic...I hope to myself...but the problem comes when people are not good at gauging the limits of themselves and their animal. The difficulty in finding that statistically improbable perfect situation is why it is BEST and most recommended to get a well broke animal if you are new to horses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jareth, the Goblin King
I move the stars for no one.
RIP Pumpkin: 2012-8/26/13
demonwolfmoon is offline  
post #9 of 13 Old 03-05-2013, 05:22 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Powhatan, Virginia
Posts: 877
• Horses: 2
Be careful about young horses who actually seem bombproof....drugging happens A LOT in the horse world...I learned a trick from someone(dunno if it's true or not) but from what was explained to me- if you flick a lighter in the horses face(obviously not too close) and they react they are likely not drugged. If the horse does not react much, they most likely are under the influence of a drug.
xlionesss is offline  
post #10 of 13 Old 03-05-2013, 05:24 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,099
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by demonwolfmoon View Post
Because, statistically speaking, it is probably true.

There are people who buck the statistic...I hope to myself...but the problem comes when people are not good at gauging the limits of themselves and their animal. The difficulty in finding that statistically improbable perfect situation is why it is BEST and most recommended to get a well broke animal if you are new to horses.
I too tried to "buck the trend" and bought my spouse the horse he wanted-not the one he needed. He is a green rider, the horse green-well mannered but green none the less. I'm very experienced and thought it would work out.

My spouse ended up getting thrown and broke his wrist so badly it needed to be plated. Not to trash up the OP's thread, but I hope relaying the tale could spare someone else the experience we had

We grow too soon old, and too late smart.
DimSum is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hey, Am I being stupid? risky rides? Radly Horse Riding 16 03-07-2012 08:43 AM
First horse purchase gumby Horse Training 5 08-09-2011 04:14 PM
would you purchase this horse? garlicbunny Horse Training 11 05-18-2011 07:23 AM
Young Rider, Young horse Cowboy Ken Horse Videos 14 11-08-2010 12:00 PM
Is it risky to buy a horse for 500 dollars? mountainhorse44 Horses for Sale 45 06-04-2009 12:28 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome