How do i get the hunter "Head set"? Please read for further explanation! - Page 3
 
 

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How do i get the hunter "Head set"? Please read for further explanation!

This is a discussion on How do i get the hunter "Head set"? Please read for further explanation! within the Hunters and Hunter Seat Equitation forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Training aids lowering horse's head
  • My horse holds his head straight out when I ride

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    11-22-2012, 10:18 PM
  #21
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokum    
Could you use the same method as teaching a WP horse to lower the head as you could for hunters?
I like to work my horse in a training fork and after he has advanced with flexing and giving to pressure I started holding both my hands straight out & up over the neck and hold pressure. Until my gelding figured out to drop his head down.
I've worked with that method a lot and it has helped us plenty. Its just repetitiousness and working with your arms straight out with pressure on the reins will beat you up but also helps gain your arm muscles!!

Now my problem LOL Because this is the same issues I' am having more so to HOLD the frame...... Is there where the Bumb comes into play? Or do I keep working the same game? I don't want to sour and I don't want to loose it either
My goofy ball like's to toss his head side to side or up and flip my reins because he's a doink!

NO.

You do not "teach headset" by pulling a horse's head down using gadgets. Absolutely not.

You need to teach the horse to carry himself properly from back to front, and teach him how to carry himself before you worry about where his head is. Get the legs correct, get the horse using his back end and his topline correctly, and the head will come down.
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    11-22-2012, 11:57 PM
  #22
Foal
I asked a simple question about using the same method. Never once did I say pull a horses head down into position and force it there? Its a training aid not spurs.

<---- LOOK at that head set.. and what? No training fork on?!?! -GASP- but you see that bulge in his neck.. Thank you training fork.
     
    11-23-2012, 12:38 AM
  #23
Weanling
Your sarcasm is adorable! However, I'm not impressed by your horses neck bulge or "head set." One, he's not in a riding situation, and two, he'd be behind the vertical and intimidated if he were.

BUT, that you pull and force a horse's head down is exactly what you said, actually.

"like to work my horse in a training fork and after he has advanced with flexing and giving to pressure I started holding both my hands straight out & up over the neck and hold pressure. Until my gelding figured out to drop his head down."

A training fork is forcing a horse's head down when you are "working with your arms straight out with pressure on the reins."

I'm not sure what "its [sic] a training aid not spurs" means exactly. Of course it's a training aid. Spurs are also a training aid, but I am more inclined to use spurs than a fork or draw reins.

Relying on a training aid to pull your horse's head down and then "the same issues I' am having more so to HOLD the frame" should give you a clue there.

Using a training fork incorrectly can cause a lot of issues down the line. For one, a lot of times it ends up being a crutch. A horse gets used to having that fork to balance off of and, if the rider is riding for so long that their arms are getting a workout, he is not learning how to properly carry himself. The horse is relying on the fork and when it's taken away he doesn't know how to carry himself properly and without that pull. That is probably why you are seeing him flip his head, he might be looking for the fork.

It is not uncommon to have a rider using equipment who doesn't know how to ride with it correctly. If you are focusing on the head, you are not using the equipment correctly. I don't like to ride with a training fork often. I'll use a training fork as a training aid when a horse is just getting going, but once they have the basics of "don't flip up your head and run off" it comes off.

If you are using a fork, you need to drive more from behind to keep the horse from becoming heavy on the forehand and leaving his hocks out, and to keep him from becoming reliant on the fork. If you are trying to suck one back to what you think is WP speed, for example, with the fork on and trying to teach him "head set" then you are most likely going to end up with a horse that is heavy on the forehand and reliant on an aid.

Driving a horse more forward, getting his body broken up so that you can move his parts independently and teaching self-carriage should always come first.

I've posted recommendations to help get a horse using his body to eventually take to a pleasure class before. I'm sure you can find it by using a search function.
     
    11-23-2012, 10:50 PM
  #24
Weanling
There's another thread on the HF that goes into more detail about western dressage. Apparently a lot of people don't like it. If I had a dressage saddle I'd probably would do that but since I don't I'm doing WD.
     

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aqha, head set, hunt seat, hus

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