Riding without intention of showing - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding > Hunters and Hunter Seat Equitation

Riding without intention of showing

This is a discussion on Riding without intention of showing within the Hunters and Hunter Seat Equitation forums, part of the English Riding category

    Like Tree12Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        04-14-2014, 10:20 AM
      #11
    Yearling
    I used to show and often in hunters and equitation classes.
    I am not competitive by nature with others so found I really did not like the show ring. It was not "fun" for me but I did it as it paid the bills {part of my job} and afforded me some incredible rides I otherwise would never had.

    For myself... the only person I choose to compete against is me.
    I ride for me, take lessons for me, have horses for me and love the animals and interaction I have with them. I am not out there to impress anyone but myself so could care less what the current "in" trend is at the moment.
    Classic riding is classic riding, that is what real hunt seat horse classes are about. The art of communication and being one with your mount...

    I ride and compete, when I compete, to see what areas of my riding needs improvement, where I am doing well and where I am having difficulties that another very educated eye is seeing...
    I ask to see the judges cards, speak politely with the judge and get their opinion if they will give it.
    I ride to have fun mostly, but it is nice to occasionally see what someone else has to say about "your style" if interested.

    The day showing was not fun was the day I said enough, no more for me. To expensive a sport, both in time, equipment needed and entry fees spent regardless of who is footing the bill..
    If your daughter/son chooses not to compete but to be a better rider for themself...I say go for it and leave it alone.
    You only need to please yourself... there are thousands out there that never step into a ring and they are fine riders, ride often, own horses and very happy...they do their own thing and are proud of that fact.
    This goes for not only "English" riding but any discipline of riding or activity with horses...there are many ways to have great enjoyment with the animal...you just need to do some searching to find your contented spot.

    jmo...
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        04-14-2014, 10:37 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    Allieloveshorses, my daughter often competes against kids on horses that cost 5x what I paid for our mare. It can be frustrating when you watch the judge place the fancy horse with a professional groom and a warm up rider over your child on her willing, but not nearly so well bred/trained horse...that she had to groom and warm up herself.

    However, we love our horse...she is the perfect horse for us and we are very proud to show her. My daughter knows that she has to work harder to get the same result as those kids on the more expensive mounts. She is ok with that.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        04-14-2014, 11:19 AM
      #13
    Trained
    Based on the type of riding you do if you want a judges opinion you can go to a schooling show and get feedback. You don't really have to compete to progress.

    I don't show. Mostly because money is finite and I would rather spend my money at a clinic than at a show.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        04-14-2014, 01:06 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    No question is a stupid question.

    I do not show, but I enjoy learning and perfecting everything. That's what I love about dressage- there's just SO MUCH to learn, and you're never done learning! It keeps it interesting!

    Right now I do not have the money to show, and I probably won't have the money or time for a few years at least. And even then, I don't know IF I'll show. Until then, I plan on riding my horses and learning as much as I can. For me, the goal is to master one small thing per day. I don't have any interest in blue ribbons or the spotlight. My feeling of satisfaction comes from executing a perfect move, or teaching the horse something new and having the horse understand. But it really depends on what type of person you are. Some people are more goal-oriented. I'm the type that just loves to enjoy the journey.

    As a side note, I did know a teen whose mother just pushed and pushed to improve her riding skills so she could show. It was completely turning the teen away from horses altogether, and the trainer saw this, and took the teen under her wing. She put off the mother so that the girl could enjoy learning, although I know there was quite a bit of pressure to show, show, show still coming from the mother.
    My father did the same thing with me and softball and martial arts. I was born with a good throwing arm, and good upper body strength. But everything became a competition to him, and it ceased to be fun for me.

    So really, it depends on how you approach showing. You might let her dabble in it, and experience it, but I wouldn't push. (Which it doesn't sound like you're that sort of parent anyway!)
    Chasin Ponies likes this.
         
        04-14-2014, 03:33 PM
      #15
    Foal
    I have to admit, some of it is me. I am not competitive at all and would almost rather NOT show, or limit it to one shows season. Right now we sort of got swept into the show season and now since she started accumulating points it feels like we are "in it". I'm not sure I want to be in it. Its expensive, LoL. And I just feel like I had a personal "aha" moment as I sat there all day watching these kids. It was a long day for a total of 10 minutes in the ring. Ya know what I mean?
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        04-14-2014, 03:49 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    I understand completely! Our barn is targeted to youth and the coach encourages the kids to go to local shows. My show fees range from $100 for 4h (including coaching fees) to around $800 for our "big" 3-day show. And that's low compared to many. I know one parent who spends a minimum of $1,500 per show because her trainer prefers the big breed shows that are further away. The trainer fees alone would be too much for us!

    Talk to your daughter, write down the pros and cons of each choice and see what makes sense for your family.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        04-14-2014, 04:05 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Horse mom...good Lord! No to the $1500 show fee! It costs us a little more than $100. So the way I see it is that is equivalent to three lessons and two bags of carrots LoL. Yes, she and I will have to discuss.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        04-14-2014, 04:05 PM
      #18
    Foal
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        04-14-2014, 04:40 PM
      #19
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TurkishVan    
    As a side note, I did know a teen whose mother just pushed and pushed to improve her riding skills so she could show. It was completely turning the teen away from horses altogether, and the trainer saw this, and took the teen under her wing. She put off the mother so that the girl could enjoy learning, although I know there was quite a bit of pressure to show, show, show still coming from the mother.
    My father did the same thing with me and softball and martial arts. I was born with a good throwing arm, and good upper body strength. But everything became a competition to him, and it ceased to be fun for me.

    So really, it depends on how you approach showing. You might let her dabble in it, and experience it, but I wouldn't push. (Which it doesn't sound like you're that sort of parent anyway!)
    What a relief to hear from a non "horse show mom"!!
    I have some clients who pushed their daughters into showing so seriously that it took every bit of the fun away, turned the girls snotty and eventually destroyed the whole family!
    I particulary hate to see horse show moms trying to live through their daughter acomplishments and want to tell them- get your #%&%$ butt out there and try it yourself!
    I showed hot and heavy for quite a few years and when I stopped long enough to breathe and think about it, I quit dead and didn't look back.
    Too much time, money and hard work and mean, resentful competitors for a little bit of fake satin!
    There are so many more things you can do with a horse rather than just showing and it's great you have the foresight to know this. Trail riding is my favorite time to decompress and if I do want a low key semi competition I go do a hunter pace.
    TurkishVan likes this.
         
        04-15-2014, 05:26 PM
      #20
    Green Broke
    Honestly I think shows are so good for kids on so many levels (assuming you have the right motives and right attitude). I never push my kids to show but I encourage them to try at least one before they make an opinion. More often then not they fall in love with it, although I do have the occasional kid who just doesn't like it and that's ok. But our barn has a great group of kids who are all friends and they love to encourage one another. Our show community is really excellent and a lot of the kids have made friends from other barns. Shows are just a really fun place to be around here! It's a great place to learn that winning isn't everything, how to lose graciously, how to win graciously, how to deal with disappointment, how to be happy for your friend, how to always love your horse even if they aren't being good, how sometimes life isn't fair, how sometimes you get things you don't deserve (good or bad), horsemanship outside of home, how to polish yourself up to make a good impression, how to work past your nerves, how to handle your fears, how to perform under pressure, what it's like to be up at the crack of dawn and work your tail off all day... These are GREAT life lessons kids learn from showing. On top of what others said about it being a great way to test your skills and such.

    Hunter shows are hard when you don't fully understand what the judges are looking for. Yes, it is subjective. But it is much more black and white then most people think it is. I highly recommend any horse show mom to pick up a copy of Judging Hunters and Hunter Seat Equitation by Anna Jane White-Mullin. It gives you a very detailed description of how judging works and what they're looking for. It helps to keep people from thinking things like "my horse didn't do well because the judge doesn't like Paints" or "you have to have the most expensive clothes or the judge won't like you". Or if you get a chance, talk to someone who judges (not the judge at the show!) to get an idea of what they're thinking! It's amazing what they see (or don't) and what they're thinking!
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    keeping your intention focussed. tinyliny Horse Training 7 02-23-2014 02:46 AM
    Not gelding a horse that you have no intention of breeding Jalter Horse Breeding 97 03-22-2013 06:30 PM
    Horse new to showing and riding JSMidnight Horse Shows 8 04-15-2012 06:05 PM
    Riding/showing a breeding stallion ~*~anebel~*~ Horse Riding 9 11-13-2009 01:16 AM
    Showing versus Riding Samantha Horse Training 5 02-06-2007 03:03 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:53 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0