Always seeing the long distance?
 
 

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Always seeing the long distance?

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  • Seeing long distance
  • How to get a good distance to a jump

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    03-03-2012, 03:29 PM
  #1
Weanling
Always seeing the long distance?

Okay so after several lessons that have focused mostly on training my eye and getting my confidence level back up about seeing distances, I've gotten much better about finding a rhythm and letting the distance come to me. I haven't been missing distances very often, if at all, which is really exciting.

I've noticed that I almost always see a longer distance. I'm learning to stick with my decision and ask for the move (and I can usually get it from Scoot). Sometimes I'll see that the distance is going to work itself out and I just need to maintain Scooter's stride. Most of the time though, 3-4 strides out I'll see the move and while it's a choice that works and we leave from a good place, I'm thinking that's kind of weird? Is it normal for me to never find myself in a place where I need to shorten and add?

My trainer for the next month or so is so happy that I'm not melting at the base and/or getting super behind in anticipation of a refusal that she hasn't even touched on my choices (except to talk about how it's good that I'm making decisions).

But anyways.
It's not like my constant urge to move up is getting us into trouble and causing stops or knocking jumps, but I just feel like it's weird that I NEVER see anything other than a long distance (with the occasional one that requires nothing). Is that a normal thing? Right now I'm just schooling 2'6"/3' so I mean Scooter can pretty much jump from anywhere and get over, but I'm just wondering.
     
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    03-03-2012, 04:06 PM
  #2
Weanling
If I were you I would practice more on finding a good distance, getting a long spot is fine in some situations but not all so its good to be able to have options. Something that has helped me is working on adding/leaving out a stride in a line but adjusting the canter. It not only helped me get my horse more adjustable but also made it easier for me to get a feel of seeing a different spot and getting a different distance. I hope this helps, good luck :)
     
    03-03-2012, 04:40 PM
  #3
Yearling
I'm actually surprised your trainer hasn't thought of it, but, go back to a pole on the ground in front of the jump. You want it placed so that the horse canters the pole and then canters the jump. This is the same as a bounce with two jumps but you are just replacing the first jump with a pole. The other thing to do is ride a course as usual but instead of having jumps, just ride poles.

It will help you with your eye...retrain it so to speak, and will also help the horse learn the best spot so if you can't see it then it is possible the horse will :)

Some horses prefer the more bold and longer distances but the landing is much more balanced when you hit it just right :)
Jumper12 likes this.
     
    03-03-2012, 06:22 PM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jumper12    
if I were you I would practice more on finding a good distance, getting a long spot is fine in some situations but not all so its good to be able to have options. Something that has helped me is working on adding/leaving out a stride in a line but adjusting the canter. It not only helped me get my horse more adjustable but also made it easier for me to get a feel of seeing a different spot and getting a different distance. I hope this helps, good luck :)
The way the jumps are set right now, we really only have one straight line. I actually don't think I even jumped that last night, now that I think about it. Hm. It's a comfortable 6, but I'm sure I could get 7 out of Scooter :p

Quote:
Originally Posted by tlkng1    
I'm actually surprised your trainer hasn't thought of it, but, go back to a pole on the ground in front of the jump. You want it placed so that the horse canters the pole and then canters the jump. This is the same as a bounce with two jumps but you are just replacing the first jump with a pole. The other thing to do is ride a course as usual but instead of having jumps, just ride poles.

It will help you with your eye...retrain it so to speak, and will also help the horse learn the best spot so if you can't see it then it is possible the horse will :)

Some horses prefer the more bold and longer distances but the landing is much more balanced when you hit it just right :)
My normal trainer is down showing at HITS Ocala right now so I've been riding with a different one for the past few weeks. We're still getting used to each other, haha.

The horse I'm riding is an older schoolmaster. Scooter certainly knows his job and has covered for me when I make the wrong decision (if we see different distances, he's usually the right one haha). Even being blind in one eye, he's still much better at finding distances

It's just...weird. The long(er) distance always feels like it's the right one. I don't get it.

Either way, Scooter definitely gets more hyped up after a few long distances and he wants to just start raving through the corners, haha.
     
    03-03-2012, 08:24 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by juniormylove    
The horse I'm riding is an older schoolmaster. Scooter certainly knows his job and has covered for me when I make the wrong decision (if we see different distances, he's usually the right one haha). Even being blind in one eye, he's still much better at finding distances

Either way, Scooter definitely gets more hyped up after a few long distances and he wants to just start raving through the corners, haha.
I rode a school horse like that. I had to actually close my eyes in the line to lose my spot so as not to interefere with his..he got oh so ticked when I asked for a different spot.

That is a "danger", so to speak, with getting a long distance. One of my past horses would take a long spot if asked but he always dropped and shook his head on the landing..never bucked it just wasn't in his makeup but he sure let you know he didn't like it. It was also nearly impossible to balance him around a corner if the long spot happened to be on the second fence of the line and if it was on the first fence he would surge forward on the landing.
     
    03-04-2012, 10:59 AM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlkng1    
I rode a school horse like that. I had to actually close my eyes in the line to lose my spot so as not to interefere with his..he got oh so ticked when I asked for a different spot.

That is a "danger", so to speak, with getting a long distance. One of my past horses would take a long spot if asked but he always dropped and shook his head on the landing..never bucked it just wasn't in his makeup but he sure let you know he didn't like it. It was also nearly impossible to balance him around a corner if the long spot happened to be on the second fence of the line and if it was on the first fence he would surge forward on the landing.
Scooter'll take a distance for me if I really ask for it (poor guy has had to jump from some weird spots before, haha. I'm really good at getting us to the second fence in a line at a half stride). It's only when I don't make a strong decision that he'll choose for me (or simply stop at the base)
     
    03-06-2012, 12:47 PM
  #7
Trained
So let me get what you're trying to say.

You're not picking a long spot to jump from as such, but rather you're seeing that you need to lengthen his stride? Whereas other posters are feeling that you're taking the actual jump itself from a long spot and that's not necessarily what you're doing? I'll address feeling the need to lengthen, rather than taking the long spot.

Striding can be fixed with one of two things, depending on where your spot is at on the stride, and how far out you can tell the striding. You can lengthen the stride, or you can shorten it. Both can and do work, and for certain stridings, both can be interchangeable.

For a long time, my horse was way too forward, so I concentrated on fitting as many strides as I could in my lines. I would shorten, shorten, shorten to get my spot. Now that I've managed to remind him to keep a rhythm and stay mostly calm, I can lengthen him out as well to get my distances. I can change a four-stride line to a three or a five if I put my mind to it. Longer stride, the horse takes fewer of them, so you get a quicker time, BUT the last thing you want to do is let your horse get all hot and strung out because that's when you get out of control and/or knock rails, so you need to be able to change that out and shorten sometimes. Try it, next time you feel like you want to lengthen just a little, why not play with shortening some? You always have that choice if you have the distance to make up for it.
     
    03-06-2012, 01:56 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue eyed pony    
So let me get what you're trying to say.

You're not picking a long spot to jump from as such, but rather you're seeing that you need to lengthen his stride? Whereas other posters are feeling that you're taking the actual jump itself from a long spot and that's not necessarily what you're doing? I'll address feeling the need to lengthen, rather than taking the long spot.

Striding can be fixed with one of two things, depending on where your spot is at on the stride, and how far out you can tell the striding. You can lengthen the stride, or you can shorten it. Both can and do work, and for certain stridings, both can be interchangeable.

For a long time, my horse was way too forward, so I concentrated on fitting as many strides as I could in my lines. I would shorten, shorten, shorten to get my spot. Now that I've managed to remind him to keep a rhythm and stay mostly calm, I can lengthen him out as well to get my distances. I can change a four-stride line to a three or a five if I put my mind to it. Longer stride, the horse takes fewer of them, so you get a quicker time, BUT the last thing you want to do is let your horse get all hot and strung out because that's when you get out of control and/or knock rails, so you need to be able to change that out and shorten sometimes. Try it, next time you feel like you want to lengthen just a little, why not play with shortening some? You always have that choice if you have the distance to make up for it.
Yes. We end up taking off from a good spot, he just has to lengthen to get there.

He'll get a little strung out on the landing side, but I can usually get him to shorten up again and rebalance in the corners/down the line (depending on how it's riding).

I used to take the short one almost every time when I was riding Fry. We focused SO much on a short stride to a short distance because if I didn't control every step like that he'd stop and have a melt down (he also almost never took the long one).

We've been doing a lot of work with long rides to single fences to work on my eye/so I don't rely on the line to set up my distance for me, so I definitely have the option to shorten. I just like...don't see the move until it seems like it'd be too late to shorten without majorly chipping? I dunno. It always feels like lengthening is the only way to get to the fence at a good place. I'm probably just paranoid of doing anything with his mouth the last few strides.

I'm not sure if it's just Scooter I do this on or all horses. Aside from schooling the little ponies occasionally, Scoot's really the only horse I'm jumping right now.

I really need to get someone to record me riding so I can see whether or not I'd even feasibly be able to shorten and still get a good distance, haha. I'm trying to convince my mom to come out for a lesson.
     
    03-06-2012, 02:28 PM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by juniormylove    
Yes. We end up taking off from a good spot, he just has to lengthen to get there.

He'll get a little strung out on the landing side, but I can usually get him to shorten up again and rebalance in the corners/down the line (depending on how it's riding).

I used to take the short one almost every time when I was riding Fry. We focused SO much on a short stride to a short distance because if I didn't control every step like that he'd stop and have a melt down (he also almost never took the long one).

We've been doing a lot of work with long rides to single fences to work on my eye/so I don't rely on the line to set up my distance for me, so I definitely have the option to shorten. I just like...don't see the move until it seems like it'd be too late to shorten without majorly chipping? I dunno. It always feels like lengthening is the only way to get to the fence at a good place. I'm probably just paranoid of doing anything with his mouth the last few strides.

I'm not sure if it's just Scooter I do this on or all horses. Aside from schooling the little ponies occasionally, Scoot's really the only horse I'm jumping right now.

I really need to get someone to record me riding so I can see whether or not I'd even feasibly be able to shorten and still get a good distance, haha. I'm trying to convince my mom to come out for a lesson.
OK so your eye for distances will develop eventually. I used to be so surprised if my horse chipped in or took the long spot (usually he would take the long spot) but I'm starting to be able to see from 3 strides out where he's likely to take off... I just can't see it far enough out to be able to do anything about it. Those last 3 strides you leave be. If you can see your distance 4-5 strides out then you can see it far enough to be able to shorten or lengthen as required, a responsive horse should adjust his stride within a stride of you asking. To get your spot it's a pretty minor adjustment 4-5 strides out to give you the spot you want, whereas 2-3 strides it would be HUGE and the horse would be thrown off balance.

What am I trying to say here again? LOL I left this post to go do something and I've gone and forgot.
     
    03-06-2012, 02:49 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by blue eyed pony    
OK so your eye for distances will develop eventually. I used to be so surprised if my horse chipped in or took the long spot (usually he would take the long spot) but I'm starting to be able to see from 3 strides out where he's likely to take off... I just can't see it far enough out to be able to do anything about it. Those last 3 strides you leave be. If you can see your distance 4-5 strides out then you can see it far enough to be able to shorten or lengthen as required, a responsive horse should adjust his stride within a stride of you asking. To get your spot it's a pretty minor adjustment 4-5 strides out to give you the spot you want, whereas 2-3 strides it would be HUGE and the horse would be thrown off balance.

What am I trying to say here again? LOL I left this post to go do something and I've gone and forgot.
I can usually see where we're going to end up 3-4 strides out, sometimes more depending on where I'm coming to the jump from. I'm really working on trusting my eye enough to make the move that I see, because I'm always second guessing myself. But when I ask Scoot to lengthen as soon as I see it, we get a really nice distance.

The only time we chip at a fence really is if I leg too hard and ride past the distance (which I'm not doing as much anymore - finally figuring out how much I need to push) or if I don't see a distance at all and have to just ride to the base and see what happens. Same goes for getting there at a really long spot.
     

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