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Big Jumps

This is a discussion on Big Jumps within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Jumping vs flatwork days
  • How to see if a horse will do big jumps

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    11-08-2012, 04:49 PM
  #21
Foal
Ripples when he walks. I didn't say he started losing muscle I said flabby meaning fat. Listen this isn't the problem! Just let me try out the gymnastics like the others said and he can get a break when he is fit again for about a day or two. Gtg, jumping lesson.
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    11-08-2012, 05:27 PM
  #22
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murcielago    
Ripples when he walks. I didn't say he started losing muscle I said flabby meaning fat. Listen this isn't the problem! Just let me try out the gymnastics like the others said and he can get a break when he is fit again for about a day or two. Gtg, jumping lesson.
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That doesn't happen to any horse on any planet. Your going to burn out your poor horse, give him a break. His joints can't take all that work.

The olny problem I see is that you are over obsessed on working your horse. Your horse will be lame way before his time is done.
     
    11-08-2012, 05:41 PM
  #23
Foal
Jumping horses at height for any period of time can be extremely detrimental to their joints, hence why even top GP riders only jump their horses at that height when necessary. The gymnastics I mentioned earlier will help keep your horse attentive and fit without jumping unnecessariy high.

Our horses in FL (showjumpers) were worked 6 days a week, jumping once, MAYBE twice. If there's a show, the two days after arriving home are taken off and the horsses are on turnout. I know you're concerned about your horse's fitness, but this isn't a terrible regiment to try out. Our horses are all very competitive in the upper levels and do consistently well, this is how I've always worked with my jumpers.
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    11-08-2012, 05:43 PM
  #24
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murcielago    
Funny how you think you know what my horse will and will not do. He's flabby, on his stomach, hocks, shoulders, and chest. Therefore I will not change my schedule because all it will do is make him more fit. I am just as dedicated as he is and I hold him to the same standards I hold myself. He gets 2 days off before week long A and AA shows to relax. That is his down time. I hold him to a high standard and we both work out hard. For me in and out of the saddle to stay fit. I just needed advice on how to make him pick his legs up more at the little 3'9 stuff
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To channel this thread back to your original question, I'm still waiting for a video if you want specific advice on how to make your horse jump better. Suggestions of gymnastics, exercises and an alternate work schedule is all great, but unless we see you riding your horse, all of that advice is generic and may not apply or be helpful.
     
    11-08-2012, 11:02 PM
  #25
Green Broke
What show were you "only" jumping 1.15?? Because according to USEF.. it looks like you just showed primarily in the .9, 1.0, and the low childrens (which is like, 1.0) until this summer when you did ONE CLASS at 1.10. (And did ok)
     
    11-08-2012, 11:05 PM
  #26
Green Broke
Oh wait, I see it. You did the WIHS at 1.15. Again, one class. Still.. I'm not seeing this "gosh my horse does so well at 4" but keeps pulling rails at only 1.15"....
     
    11-08-2012, 11:13 PM
  #27
Green Broke
Is this the horse in your "horse" section? Is it an old photo, because that horse is not in shape, and is very hallow. For a horse that is worked so much, he should be ripped.
     
    11-09-2012, 12:10 AM
  #28
Green Broke
Ok. This is what I see. From the YouTube video I found online. I see an ok but determined rider who is learning the ropes at .90. I don't think your horse is terribly flabby or so horribly hollow. But I do think you get in his way, which is to be expected if you're a solid .90-1.0 rider. To really progress you must work on your flatwork. I'm not seeing a super educated rider in that regard (yes, I can tell even from a jumping round). From this point on to be ultimately successful you must do flatwork flatwork flatwork. If your trainer thinks lunging is the way to go... Ok. Maybe it has worked for your horse. But I don't think it's the best program. First of all, if you as a rider are a bigger part of getting your horse fit your jumping (and riding) will improve exponentially. Also, it's so so so much easier on your horse's joints. Youve got to take care of those as much as you can if you want a horse sound enough for the bigger stuff. The not sweating thing is a huge deal you've got to tackle somehow. It's way too hot in tx to not sweat. You can get twice as efficient of a work out from 20 min of good flatwork compared to 20 min on the lunge line. Since your time is limited due to the heat I'd be as efficient as I could and give lots of electrolytes. Also I'd utilize your winter and let it be your hardest training time.

By flatwork I'd do LOTS of shoulder in. Leg yield. Counter canter. Renvers. Travers. Etc. And not just a whole bunch of shoulder ins, do combos of these exercises. Get your horse more on his haunch so he can power over the fences. He's very scopy and looks like a really cool guy. I think you have a lot going for you and you could be very successful. But I'd say 1.0-1.10 is where you'll stall out until your flatwork improves.
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    11-09-2012, 01:31 AM
  #29
Yearling
I'm not trying to be nosey...simply trying to learn...Thus, two questions:
1) I'd love to see this lady work her horse to get a mental picture of what is being referred to in the last few posts of the thread thus far. Therefore, how were you able to locate her YouTube videos without her name on YouTube? (<--technologically "doh!", here...sorry!)

2) Would anyone mind remediating the conversation a bit for just a second to explain for me the effect of sweating vs. not sweating in terms of fitness...I've never though to ask, as my lesson horse who is a 3rd level dressage horse and isn't asked to perform anywhere CLOSE to that level for ME in lessons sweats like a little hydrant after one hour of flatwork (walk/trot/halt/reverse/sidepasses/serpentines/ground trot poles and cavalletti patterns, etc...She's in quite good shape, though her sweating always WORRIES ME! I feel like if she's wet beneath her pad and leg wraps, as well as some mild sweating on her neck, chest and rump, she's working a bit TOO HARD for her, given that she's trained to do so much more , & I think in shape for such as well, (which I'M not anywhere near the level to ask her to do), I often am concerned about whether what I'm asking of her should even be considered a "good workout" for her! In other words, her sweating is something I should WANT? Good information & apologies for being so uneducated re: this issue.

Thanks all; and I can't wait to hear more about the plan for this highly motivated rider and her mount!!
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    11-09-2012, 02:10 AM
  #30
Started
^^
To me NOT sweating (as in: never sweating, a disorder disrupting the horses ability to sweat) is much more concerning than sweating too much just because sweating is basically your bodies' cooling system. Think about things that burst into flames because they get too hot and can't cool themselves, well I doubt pony is going to turn into a fireball BUT it does increase the risk of health issues DRAMATICALLY and can be seriously detrimental. But that's where my 'vast knowledge' ends . In terms of your lesson horse... well maybe it's just too hot? Unless that horse also has an issue with sweating and is predisposed to sweat too much.


Now to the OP: it is physically impossible for your horse to become 'flabby' after a week off, just like it takes time to build muscle, it takes just as much time to lose muscle and build fat. Maybe YOU believe your horse looks a bit 'flabby' because you're convinced you need to be on a strict routine, but I agree with the others that say your horse needs a BREAK. One day off wont be detrimental to your horse, in fact a day off to mend will HELP your horse build muscle and stamina. Muscles build by ripping and healing, he needs time to HEAL and re cooperate. On top of that, I strongly dislike jumping my horse 2'9 more than once a week, I feel it is detrimental for his joints and I want a competitive, sound horse well into his teen years. By over jumping him you can be causing all sorts of soreness, potential arthritis and lameness.

It sounds to me like he's burnt out, he cannot handle everything you're dumping on him, and by continuing with the 'super strict' regime especially in a hot area you're not going to boost his stamina, just sour him.
     

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