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Bolting after Jumps??

This is a discussion on Bolting after Jumps?? within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Horses thst bolt after jumps

 
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    01-29-2011, 02:51 AM
  #11
Foal
I approach the jump at a walk. Obviously, if your going to do this, practice with a tiny jump. Walk her over it, just like it's a trotting pole. After your happy, walk around the arena. Turn her towards the jump, a few strides before, trot. She'll probably go quite slow, so won't bolt. Also, putting trot poles before the jump makes her think a bit more.

Also, try combinations. Put two jumps in front on each other and trot her over them. She'll have to focus more on the striding. Make sure you put a trot pole after the last jump so she won't bolt.

Or you could just try cantering her or trotting a circle just before the jump to get the speed YOU want.
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    01-29-2011, 10:45 AM
  #12
Green Broke
I don't think this is a purely a training issue. Horses run because they are either anxious or in pain. Or often, they are anxious there will be pain. The fact that she's trying to avoid the jump and then takes off after makes me think that this is a rider/equipment/physical issue that needs to be taken care of first. (and maybe those things taught her to run and avoid the fence) When you try and "control" her over the air, are you hitting her in the mouth? Are you getting unbalanced after and hitting her in the back? Those would be my first guesses. Are you getting stiff and anxious and making her stiff and anxious? That would be my second guess.

Another big mistake people make with a horse that gets fast on the backside is to slow them way down on the approach. Your horse has an "optimal speed" that is most comfortable for her to be jumping out of. If you come to the fence underpaced it can scare a horse and make them get quick on the backside. However, since your horse is also trying to avoid the fence I'm thinking this isn't just it. Like MIE said, check your tack, check your horse's back, and most importantly check yourself.
     
    01-29-2011, 10:52 AM
  #13
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnover    
I don't think this is a purely a training issue. Horses run because they are either anxious or in pain. Or often, they are anxious there will be pain. The fact that she's trying to avoid the jump and then takes off after makes me think that this is a rider/equipment/physical issue that needs to be taken care of first.

(and maybe those things taught her to run and avoid the fence) When you try and "control" her over the air, are you hitting her in the mouth? Are you getting unbalanced after and hitting her in the back? Those would be my first guesses. Are you getting stiff and anxious and making her stiff and anxious? That would be my second guess.

Another big mistake people make with a horse that gets fast on the backside is to slow them way down on the approach. Your horse has an "optimal speed" that is most comfortable for her to be jumping out of. If you come to the fence underpaced it can scare a horse and make them get quick on the backside.

However, since your horse is also trying to avoid the fence I'm thinking this isn't just it. Like MIE said, check your tack, check your horse's back, and most importantly check yourself.
Exactly, and well said!

Remember OP - our horses reflect 100% of what we are doing in the tack.
     
    01-29-2011, 11:01 AM
  #14
Yearling
Mine used to do this (besides the refusing) when I was teaching him how to jump.

What I did, was every time I jumped a single, I'd stop. I'd do that a lot of times and eventually he got it. After he started getting into the stopping routine after the fence, I would jump the fence, and go all the way into the corner (or farther if your in a field) and stop again. I'd just work longer and longer until he finally got to the point where he stopped thinking about what we were going to do, and just listened to my command.

Maybe you should get a trainer to get on her too? If she's not wanting to jump maybe she needs a professional on her? Just a little thought(:

Good luck with her.
     
    01-30-2011, 07:26 AM
  #15
Started
Thanks justjump!!! Also MIeventer and upover could it be that I don't have my hands right bbecause I know at the moment that I don't ?????
     
    01-30-2011, 09:43 AM
  #16
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverada    


JUMPING
1. Do not give front your hands. Obviously the obstacle is not that big yet, so don't ease your contact.
You should always give with your hands over the jump, no matter how small it is. If you always stiff your horse in the face over jumps, you will just teach her to jump hollow and avoid contact. Plus, you want it to be second nature to give with your hands while jumping. It's a hard habit to break down the line.

I'd suggest taking a few lessons with a trainer in your area. Also try reading some of George Morris' books and his articles in Practical Horseman magazine. I'd also suggest reading Anne Kursinski's Riding and Jumping Clinic
     
    01-30-2011, 08:53 PM
  #17
Started
Thankyou thia !! There isn't really anyone around that I cann take lessons with
:( but I will follow up on those books!!
     
    01-30-2011, 09:13 PM
  #18
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caitlinpalomino    
thanks justjump!!! Also MIeventer and upover could it be that I don't have my hands right bbecause I know at the moment that I don't ?????

Very VERY possible! Do you know what you are doing with your hands? We might be able to help if you don't have any eyes on the ground where you are.

Like Thia mentioned... when you don't give (release) with your arms over the fence you accidentally yank on your horse's mouth over the fence, which hurts! And then your horse starts to associate, jumping = pain. And either won't want to do it or will try and run away from the pain. I don't know what level of jumping you are at right now but when my students start off I have them get into a half seat to the jump. When they get about 9 feet out I have them reach forward a bit, pressing their hands on thier horse's crest (and grab mane if they're complete beginners). It's called a "crest release". It will keep you from hitting your horse in the mouth AND popping up to early and hitting your horse in the back (might be happening too, don't know).

Post a few pics or videos and one of use on here I'm sure could offer some advice!
     
    01-31-2011, 12:29 PM
  #19
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thia    
You should always give with your hands over the jump, no matter how small it is.
I v heard from a lot of instructors that by learning yourself to give with your hands when it's not needed, is against the balance of the horse. I guess that she doesn't have the tightest contact, so by giving her hands, would cause the lost of balance and the chance for the horse to think that it's on a long reing.
I didn't suggested not ever to give her hand forward, but right now, she is just learning to jumping so obviously she is doing small jumps, and her horse is running and speeding up after those.
     
    02-01-2011, 07:37 AM
  #20
Trained
I find when people and horses are learning to jump it is best to start a release before take off so they learn they are never going to be hit in the face. Great post upnover.

It would be great to see some video or even pics
     

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