charging jumps?????....HELP!!!!!! - Page 13
 
 

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charging jumps?????....HELP!!!!!!

This is a discussion on charging jumps?????....HELP!!!!!! within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category

     
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        04-23-2009, 08:44 PM
      #121
    Foal
    I'm not sure why you keep flaunting your coaches and your coaches students at us. It does not mean that everything you say is correct.
         
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        04-23-2009, 08:52 PM
      #122
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LisaClarke    
    I'm not sure why you keep flaunting your coaches and your coaches students at us. It does not mean that everything you say is correct.
    I just listed them because she listed who her coaches were and what they had done. OK? You can go back and look if you didn't see. I didn't say that everything I said was correct I said I disagreed. Someohow people are twisting my words.
         
        04-23-2009, 08:53 PM
      #123
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LisaClarke    
    I'm not sure why you keep flaunting your coaches and your coaches students at us. It does not mean that everything you say is correct.
    Never mind I'll just quote it! UGH!

    "My Coach went A Circuit, and went GP Jumping. He schools under GM when he comes to Chicago, his students clean house in the A Circuit Hunter/Jumper world in Detroit and Chicago. He trains under a Prix Saint George Dressage Competator - and he teaches circles and bending through seat into legs at our lessons.

    My other coach - from New York now living here running a large fascillity - A Circuit competator, another student under GM - trains the same way."
         
        04-23-2009, 09:16 PM
      #124
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Trissacar    
    I disagree.
    How many dressage riders do you see just stop the horse to keep the horse from speeding up or getting heavy?
    I have seen it many times.
    Since you have made a dressage assumption and I feel I have some knowledge in this area I will tell you that unless the halt is to test control or obedience they should never do it to correct speed or balance.

    The most acceptable correction for too much speed or for balance loss is directional changes. The lost of impulsion (which is what a halt will do) is the last thing a dressage rider wants. I good rider learns to manage what the horse gives you and redirect it.

    THAT is dressage.

    I do however see over and over again a rider using a wall or fence line to stop a horse after jumping and all that does, is show me loss of control and poor riding.
         
        04-23-2009, 09:18 PM
      #125
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Spyder    
    Since you have made a dressage assumption and I feel I have some knowledge in this area I will tell you that unless the halt is to test control or obedience they should never do it to correct speed or balance.

    The most acceptable correction for too much speed or for balance loss is directional changes. The lost of impulsion (which is what a halt will do) is the last thing a dressage rider wants. I good rider learns to manage what the horse gives you and redirect it.

    THAT is dressage.

    I do however see over and over again a rider using a wall or fence line to stop a horse after jumping and all that does, is show me loss of control and poor riding.
    ]
    Yeah okaaaaaay......
         
        04-24-2009, 12:53 AM
      #126
    Trained
    Quote:
    Since you have made a dressage assumption and I feel I have some knowledge in this area I will tell you that unless the halt is to test control or obedience they should never do it to correct speed or balance.

    The most acceptable correction for too much speed or for balance loss is directional changes. The lost of impulsion (which is what a halt will do) is the last thing a dressage rider wants. I good rider learns to manage what the horse gives you and redirect it.

    THAT is dressage.

    I do however see over and over again a rider using a wall or fence line to stop a horse after jumping and all that does, is show me loss of control and poor riding.
    Great post, and I completely agree. Now, I am no where at the level of dressage you are, nor am as experienced as you are - but what I was taught through clinics, is exactly as you described.

    I was shown that you do circles directly after a fence and move on doing dressage movements - or as Hunters call it - flatwork. Then go over the next fence, and repeat.

    I have seen the halt thing done, and I disagree with it. I don't see any functionallity that comes from it - afterall, you must have balance, rhythm, control, tempo, straitness, calmness before the fence. If you don't have that, why bother going over a fence until you correct the issues first.

    I appreciate your input very much.
         
        04-24-2009, 10:40 AM
      #127
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Trissacar    
    ]
    Yeah okaaaaaay......
    by your response do you mean you don't understand or you don't agree?
         
        04-24-2009, 11:19 AM
      #128
    Trained
    Morse than likely, she does noy agree.

    Sypder took the time out to post her thoughts, and her experiences and where she is in the Dressage World - and all she gets is sarcasim?
         
        04-24-2009, 01:06 PM
      #129
    Weanling
    My appendix mare used to rush fences like it was her only job in the world. Lol She'd see a fence and away she'd charge. If I stopped her, it only made her more tense and braced. I did as exactly as Spyder and MI Eventer are trying to get across. I can't count the number of times I had to do a circle or two before the next jump. My trainer told me I was not allowed to pull on her face, just circle her while trying to encourage her to slow down by the change in my body. Once she did, she was allowed to walk. Boy was that an experience for me at the time. Here is my horse, blasting towards this fence(not out of control, but not steady by any means), and I was only allowed to slow her with my body, otherwise leave her face completely alone. The more times I did that, the fences got boring the more boring I was, and in time I learned a very special and important skill. Riding with my body, not my hands, and teaching my horse to feel me.
    She'll never look like a slow-mo hunter type mover, but now she stays right with me due to the communication of my body, which taught her how to relax.
         
        04-24-2009, 03:31 PM
      #130
    Trained
    My mom got me the May issue of Horse Illustrated. It has an article "Fresh Fences" that suggests some exercises. This thread made me think of it. Their first exercise is "Transistion Between Fences" and it says "Bring your horse to a halt between elements in the combination"

    It then goes on to say: (Quoting directly here)

    Rusing fences is a common problem amoung hot blooded horses or any high strung horse. If your horse takes off after his first jump and then proceeds to gallop out of control through the rest of the course, you need to break up the pace.
    Start by calmly trotting your horse around a course of five or six fences including one four or fice stride combination. Ask for a halt a few strides after the first fence. When your horse has completley stopped, pick up a trot again and ride toward the next fence. Break up sections of the course by asking for a few strides of walk between the fences, if necissary.
    Once your horse is relaxed and focused, begin the course again at a canter, coming down to a trot after each jump. Resume the canter a few strides before each fence. If this doesnt stop him from rushing, come down to a walk for several strides before resuming the canter. You can also stay in a trot up to your fences if this is more helpful with correcting the rushing problem. When you reach the comination, ask your horse to halt before proceeding to the second element. Variety will keep your horse on his toes and listening to you, which should be the objective every time you jump a course" (By Holly Werner)


    I think maybe this is the thing Trissicar was talking about. However, when I was reading this, I was thinking it would cause your horse to anticipate stopping and start slowing after the jumps. What Spyder and MIEventer said made a bit more sense to me.

    So to you guys, (Spyder, MIEventer, Koomy) would this exercise they are talking about cause your horse to brace and anticipate like it seems, or am I missing something here


    -signed the lowly barrel racing turned english newb
         

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