crest release vs auto release
   

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crest release vs auto release

This is a discussion on crest release vs auto release within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category
  • automatic release
  • Auto release vs crest release

 
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    08-15-2008, 07:06 AM
  #1
Trained
crest release vs auto release

Ive been seeing automatics releases around a lot lately. The most recent by lucinda fredericks (from the silver medal winning australian equestrian team :):):) *beams with pride*) in the cross country leg of the comp. I havent been able to watch a replay of it yet but if I remember correctly she alternated between crest and auto release throughout the course. I believe the same in the showjumping.

I've been doing quite a bit of jumping lately and I use a crest release as that's how I was taught but im thinking there seems to be some benefits to the auto release like when turning straight out of a jump etc etc are there any disadvantages to using the auto release?

Which one is "best"?
     
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    08-15-2008, 09:30 AM
  #2
Green Broke
I think it depends entirely on the skill level of the rider. To do a proper auto release (one that does not pull on your horse's mouth) a rider must know how to keep a proper contact and following hand at all times when riding and be secure enough going over the fence that your hands are absolutely unnecessary for balance. I consider this to be a very advanced release and really only necessary at times during a more technical jumper/cross country course where you really need that extra control through the fence or when you land. And even still, most riders use them through the course only as needed. I don't think I'd teach a student an auto release until they were jumping solidly at 3", but that's just my opinion! Remember also that there are 2 kinds of crest releases. Short and long. Long is what you learn when you first learn to jump (hands forward, loop in the rein) short is when you keep a fair amount of contact, but you're still resting your hands on your horses crest. I consider the short crest release (when you're ready for it) to be the best. But like I said, that's just my opinion! :)
     
    08-15-2008, 12:09 PM
  #3
Showing
I have seen it a lot lately too. I guess it just depends.
I use crest release too, 'cause that's how I've been taught. I would like to try an auto release though.
     
    08-15-2008, 12:57 PM
  #4
Showing
In all honesty, I didn't know about auto releases until recently, probably on this forum! I agree with the principles, but after 16 years of doing crest releases, I still find myself doing that out of habit! Having said that, when I make a conscious effort, it's actually easier for me to do an auto than a crest.. strange.
The idea with an auto release is to keep that straight line from elbow to bit (as when you're riding) and not break that, as with when you do a crest release.
Since I'm not too familiar with it, I'll leave it at that.

I just thought I'd point out that I find it a bit weird that people say that an auto release "separates the boys from the men" - I didn't even know about it till recently... does that mean I'm still a "boy"?? Erm.. that came out wrong... but I consider myself a very experienced (hunter) rider, but yet I used a crest release through my showing career, and do find it a habit that's hard to break...
     
    08-15-2008, 03:00 PM
  #5
Foal
I always use a crest release. Its effective and easy enough that it doesn't require too much focus over fences. I think theres too much room for error in an automatic release that could mess you up big on a course, and its just not neccesary unless your doing something where you need that kind of contact.
     
    08-15-2008, 05:07 PM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnover
I think it depends entirely on the skill level of the rider. To do a proper auto release (one that does not pull on your horse's mouth) a rider must know how to keep a proper contact and following hand at all times when riding and be secure enough going over the fence that your hands are absolutely unnecessary for balance. I consider this to be a very advanced release and really only necessary at times during a more technical jumper/cross country course where you really need that extra control through the fence or when you land. And even still, most riders use them through the course only as needed. I don't think I'd teach a student an auto release until they were jumping solidly at 3", but that's just my opinion! Remember also that there are 2 kinds of crest releases. Short and long. Long is what you learn when you first learn to jump (hands forward, loop in the rein) short is when you keep a fair amount of contact, but you're still resting your hands on your horses crest. I consider the short crest release (when you're ready for it) to be the best. But like I said, that's just my opinion! :)
yes a short release is what I use now.
P.s. I know what they all are I was more kinda looking for the downside etc of auto release as I've never used it myself ;)

JDI - I can't see myself changing over very easily which is why I will probably stick with crest releases :) the whole motion for me is so 'natural' for want of a better word, that trying to change it all now would be a big old pain the butt :) if I ever made it to jumping huge courses etc I would probably think about it but I don't think theres too much need for it at the moment :)
     
    08-15-2008, 05:18 PM
  #7
Green Broke
JDI- I don't see very many auto releases in the hunter ring! Maybe trainers don't mess with teaching them because it's not really necessary and would rather you concentrate on a good position? Don't know! I think it's more of a jumper or eq thing... when you have to land, balance, and immediately turn or balance through a difficult combination.

The downfalls of an auto release? Probably doing it wrong! If you aren't secure enough over the fence (or if it takes you a minute to balance again after you land) it's much too easy to hit your horse in the mouth, lose your balance and hit their back, or lose your balance all together! And even the most balanced secure rider needs to use the neck once in a while!
     
    08-15-2008, 06:22 PM
  #8
Yearling
Yes auto release is a jumper/eventer thing, it makes it easier to go over certain jumps.

Personally i've always been trained as a jumper so it's natural for me to do an auto release instead of a crest release, I tried to do the crest and it seemed so unnatural to me.

But it's def only for those that have an independent seat and can jump without catching the horses mouth.
     
    08-15-2008, 06:24 PM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnover
JDI- I don't see very many auto releases in the hunter ring! Maybe trainers don't mess with teaching them because it's not really necessary and would rather you concentrate on a good position? Don't know! I think it's more of a jumper or eq thing... when you have to land, balance, and immediately turn or balance through a difficult combination.

The downfalls of an auto release? Probably doing it wrong! If you aren't secure enough over the fence (or if it takes you a minute to balance again after you land) it's much too easy to hit your horse in the mouth, lose your balance and hit their back, or lose your balance all together! And even the most balanced secure rider needs to use the neck once in a while!

Haha neither I nor my horse was ever "brave" enough to do the jumpers, so that's why I stuck to the hunters for the most part :P
It makes sense though, and I find I am using more of an auto release on Maia, just to keep a nice steady contact on her without interfering with her movement...
     
    08-16-2008, 12:50 AM
  #10
Foal
I don't even think about it if i'm doing a crest or auto. I do whatever release fits how my horse jumped it, our apporach, the turn we have to make, etc. Normally when im doing a roll back I do an auto with a opening inside rein for example. Over simple straight foward lines, I do a crest release. If my horse jumps very round I normally have a auto reliease just to follow him better.Or if he jumps oddly I either do an auto to a crest that I slip through my hands [my horse can sometimes take off wayyy to early.. haha cauzing my to get left behind.] I find when you are ready, it's great to know both for certain situations, i'm an eventer and the steriotype is for auto's but i'm mainly crest release with auto's when needed :]
     

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