cross country! - Page 4
 
 

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cross country!

This is a discussion on cross country! within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category

     
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        02-17-2009, 12:46 AM
      #31
    Foal
    MIeventer, great post!

    I event, and my first time out to see if I even WANTED to pursue eventing training I did an unrecognized event. If you're new to eventing, definitely do this first. I did the 12'' class, (which kinnnd of felt like a joke because Lena and I were showing considerably higher at the time- and I was against a bunch of kiddies xD) to see if my horse and I were even compatible for the sport! Luckily we were fine and even won our division, but one of my friends discovered that her horse had a fear of giant rocks on her way into the DRESSAGE ARENA wayy before we even got near the cross country field. The judge had to come out of her car and lead the horse past the rock! Can you imagine if that happened at a recognized event? Actually, it wouldn't happen. The judge would just be like "oops times up to enter the arena, DQ!" Oh, and there's also a pretty big price difference between recognized and unrecognized eventing. In my MD area, unrecognized is around $80, and USEA starts around $175 for BN.

    If you're planning on competing period, find a cross country course to school on before you go out to compete! Nothing prepared me better than going out and messing around on an actual USEA approved course for a day. Even though homemade cross country jumps are cute and fun to school on, they're really not the same thing- unless your barn actually invested the money in a realistic course. You should also know how your horse reacts to water because chances are, you may run into some issues your first time asking your horse to blindly plunge into a scary pond, and this is where your crop comes in handy too! Lena hates water, and one event over the summer the course was on had 2 separate water jumps. The first one, Lena skidded to a stop in front of the bank and I had to kick her before she jumped into it. The second water jump actually had a jump 2 strides before the bank, and once Lena landed she skidded to stop before that pond! Besides that I almost came off, no matter how many times I kicked her she wouldn't stop side stepping around the water, so when I finally remembered that I had been holding a crop the entire time after smacksmacksmack we were off into the water! Moral(s) of the story, always know what your horse is going to do in front of something "scary", and always cary a crop. ;)

    Oh, and unrecognized events go from elementary (12'') to baby beginner novice (2'). I'm not aware of any 2'3 divisions...

    Good luck!
         
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        02-17-2009, 09:59 AM
      #32
    Banned
    Yeah, I was thinking for about a few months I would school on it before I compete! Thank you...
         
        02-17-2009, 09:03 PM
      #33
    Green Broke
    I live in Area V and our schoooling shows go up to Training, beause that was my friends frist training event!
         
        02-17-2009, 09:48 PM
      #34
    Started
    I have to agree 100% with MIEventer. So much of the sport is so hard - and there's a lot different in training an eventer than a jumper or a hunter. My eventer is trained completely different in that I will often drop the reins to the fence and let him learn to navigate the fence himself, learn balance and take off and landing, etc., as opposed to my jumper where I want him to wait for me to tell him where and when and how.

    There's some great articles in Practical Horsemen by Jim Wofford about eventing and how the more we take the decisions away from our horses over the XC fences, and the more they rely on us, the more accidents there will be. And I completely agree. Horses can jump amazing things on their own and like MIEventer said, you need a reliable mount that is a skilled jumper, and you need to be balanced to move with the horse and not interfere. It's VERY different than jumpers or hunters or equitation. (I'm not saying this NEARLY as eloquently or intelligently as Jim W - please look up the article on Equisearch.com - it's a MUST read for any eventers).

    There's also the understanding of the courses, the different fences, the level of conditioning necessary, and the ability to ride on all kinds of terrain in varying conditions. Someone a few months ago on here asked about jumping in snow, and I had replied that I've jumped 3'3" in snow that was soft with a solid base, on my horse that was trained in various footing but it took a LONG time to build up to that. Same goes with jumping in mud, and not just up and down embankments, but up and downhill, also important elements of most XC courses. There's a lot that goes into it, so please please do NOT go into this w/o an eventing coach! I saw some riders in my area go to an eventing course with their jumper trainer (who is NOT experienced in eventing) and the jumping was disasterous...and quite dangerous.....

    Be safe, find a trainer, and then have fun!
         
        02-17-2009, 09:56 PM
      #35
    Green Broke
    Yea, I would suggest conditioning in rain! I did it today, it wasn't so bad! Lol not sure how much Blue liked it though!
         
        02-17-2009, 11:32 PM
      #36
    Yearling
    Also you need someone to teach you to walk your course, find the half way point, and teach you how to work out times and ride to them.
         
        02-22-2009, 03:17 PM
      #37
    Trained
    Quote:
    I have to agree 100% with MIEventer. So much of the sport is so hard - and there's a lot different in training an eventer than a jumper or a hunter. My eventer is trained completely different in that I will often drop the reins to the fence and let him learn to navigate the fence himself, learn balance and take off and landing, etc., as opposed to my jumper where I want him to wait for me to tell him where and when and how.

    There's some great articles in Practical Horsemen by Jim Wofford about eventing and how the more we take the decisions away from our horses over the XC fences, and the more they rely on us, the more accidents there will be. And I completely agree. Horses can jump amazing things on their own and like MIEventer said, you need a reliable mount that is a skilled jumper, and you need to be balanced to move with the horse and not interfere. It's VERY different than jumpers or hunters or equitation. (I'm not saying this NEARLY as eloquently or intelligently as Jim W - please look up the article on Equisearch.com - it's a MUST read for any eventers).

    There's also the understanding of the courses, the different fences, the level of conditioning necessary, and the ability to ride on all kinds of terrain in varying conditions. Someone a few months ago on here asked about jumping in snow, and I had replied that I've jumped 3'3" in snow that was soft with a solid base, on my horse that was trained in various footing but it took a LONG time to build up to that. Same goes with jumping in mud, and not just up and down embankments, but up and downhill, also important elements of most XC courses. There's a lot that goes into it, so please please do NOT go into this w/o an eventing coach! I saw some riders in my area go to an eventing course with their jumper trainer (who is NOT experienced in eventing) and the jumping was disasterous...and quite dangerous.....

    Be safe, find a trainer, and then have fun!
    Excellant post! Bravo and well said!
         
        02-25-2009, 09:23 AM
      #38
    Foal
    Not to dissuade you from the discipline, but I seem to remember you were having bolting issues last month? Have you managed to resolve this yet? I'd probably suggest focusing on flat work progressing to grid work over the next year, and building up your relationship with your horse. He's young, so you have plenty of time. Start from a solid base next year, and it'll be much more rewarding! :)
         
        02-25-2009, 08:53 PM
      #39
    Banned
    Yes I did, I took away the tie down and what do you know....it worked!!
         
        02-26-2009, 04:53 AM
      #40
    Yearling
    'There's some great articles in Practical Horsemen by Jim Wofford about eventing and how the more we take the decisions away from our horses over the XC fences, and the more they rely on us, the more accidents there will be.'

    BRAVO, completely agree. Too many people pushing, holding, and carrying their horses around Event courses, in my opinion!
         

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