Flat work that will help jumping - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 16 Old 05-28-2011, 06:03 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
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Flat work that will help jumping

Hi. So my horse and I have started jumping a bit higher now, and we're going to start showing shortly. I'm wondering if there are any excersises (sp?) that we could do on the flat that would help with are jumping. I need to work on collecting and extending the canter, judging distances before jumps, sharper corners, and picking up speed without extending. Any idea, tips, or tricks would be greatly appreciated!

For without a horse, i could not fly.
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post #2 of 16 Old 05-28-2011, 06:41 PM
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You just answered part of your own question! Collecting and lengthening your horse's stride on the flat will translate to your jumping, as well when you need to adjust for a distance. To gain control of your horse's ribcage and to get them listening, you can work on a counter bend to a correct bend. For tighter turns, make sure you have your horse moving off of your outside leg. Something that really helped me was to set up a 'box' with groundpoles as the sides. Make it about the size of a 20m circle. Walk, trot, and if you want canter on the inside of the poles and focus on square turns, even a turn on the haunches in each corner. If you want, you can also try some transitions- trot down the side, walk and turn on the haunches in the corner, trot down the side, turn on the haunches, etc. Serpentines help, as well. Any kind of lateral work will help you- use the leg-yield, shoulder-in, haunches in, etc. to gain control of your horse's entire body and get both him and you more in-tune with each other.


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post #3 of 16 Old 05-28-2011, 10:53 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by anrz View Post
You just answered part of your own question! Collecting and lengthening your horse's stride on the flat will translate to your jumping, as well when you need to adjust for a distance. To gain control of your horse's ribcage and to get them listening, you can work on a counter bend to a correct bend. For tighter turns, make sure you have your horse moving off of your outside leg. Something that really helped me was to set up a 'box' with groundpoles as the sides. Make it about the size of a 20m circle. Walk, trot, and if you want canter on the inside of the poles and focus on square turns, even a turn on the haunches in each corner. If you want, you can also try some transitions- trot down the side, walk and turn on the haunches in the corner, trot down the side, turn on the haunches, etc. Serpentines help, as well. Any kind of lateral work will help you- use the leg-yield, shoulder-in, haunches in, etc. to gain control of your horse's entire body and get both him and you more in-tune with each other.
Thanks the box idea sounds great! I hate leg yeilding, but if it help, ill work on it!

For without a horse, i could not fly.
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post #4 of 16 Old 05-28-2011, 11:03 PM
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Shoulder ins. Half passes. Working over poles. The more supple you make your horse the better he will preform. There are lots of gymnastics that can help you learn to see your distances.

live for the moment.
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post #5 of 16 Old 05-30-2011, 01:34 AM Thread Starter
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What are shoulder in and half passes?
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post #6 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 02:28 PM
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Shoulder in is two tracking. You push your horses front over with your leg but keep the but where it was. It is easy to start doing this with a rail. Ask your horse to come off the rail with just his front. You apply leg at or in front of the girth. You do this both directions. You can also do a Hunches in which is the same thing except you push the but off the rail and leave the shoulders on. You apply pressure behind the girth.
A Half pass is side passing while going forward. It can be a little tricky to get down but it really makes your horse focus on you and work their body.
Start buy making sure they understand a side pass. Moving their body side ways with out going forwards. Then ask them to move forwards and apply leg to ask them to move side ways with out letting them bend their body. It is not easy at first but as the build their muscles and get more in tune to what you want it will get easier.
You can also work over ground poles to change things up and help with your distances.

live for the moment.
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post #7 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 07:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Hailey1203 View Post
Thanks the box idea sounds great! I hate leg yeilding, but if it help, ill work on it!

Leg yielding is a fabulous start to getting your horse to work properly on the flat for the goal of jumping better. Your goal is to get your horse to working off his haunch and engage his hind end. That will REALLY help his jumping. How do you that without lateral work? Truth is, you really can't. Leg yielding, shoulder in, haunches in, turns on the forehand/haunch are excellent exercises to get your horse moving well, increase fitness, increase rideability, improve communication, let you understand how to truley feel a horse working underneath you, etc. Some people may call this "dressage". I just think of it as "good flatwork". IMO, these exercises are very difficult to do well and understand without a good trainer who knows how to teach them.
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post #8 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 07:53 PM
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Dressage training, and lots of it!
I was a diehard hunter/jumper that hit my ceiling when my basic flatwork wasn't enough to cope with higher fences. Took a year off jumping for schooling strictly dressage, and I'm a convert. It helped my jumping so much I cannot describe the changes accurately. Went from doing an "ok" 3'6" course to 4' with ease - and that's where my mare topped out. Everything was easier with some dressage training under our belts.
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post #9 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 08:10 PM
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Went from doing an "ok" 3'6" course to 4' with ease - and that's where my mare topped out. Everything was easier with some dressage training under our belts.
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And you're lucky you could even do an "ok" 3"6 course without it! IMO people jumping 2"6 (or better yet, 2") should be getting serious about their flatwork.
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post #10 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 11:15 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the great idea guys! I'll try these when I go ride on thursday. I'll let you know how it goes!

For without a horse, i could not fly.
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