The hardest part of jumping seems to be the distances! - Page 3 - The Horse Forum

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post #21 of 31 Old 06-18-2010, 12:36 AM
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no, because if it's angled towards you, then you have a shorter distance to get to the jump, angled away, a longer distance to get to it. So in theory, that sounds correct.

Ah! I knew I had it right, I was second guessing myself there trying to remember exactly what it was that I learnt.

It works great for me!

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post #22 of 31 Old 06-23-2010, 06:11 PM
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I used to have SUCH problems with my distances. It really came down to me being a control freak and trying to ride the entire course for my mare. Quitting jumping for a month and focusing solely on flatwork helped me learn to keep a steady, rythmical pace and finally, put aside my controlling ways and let my horse do her job. We've had amazing improvements.
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post #23 of 31 Old 07-09-2010, 07:12 PM
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If you keep counting between fences, it helps to keep the rhythm and helps to keep you relaxed, as it helps to stop you fixating on the fence. If find this really works when training and when jumping in the ring. I often count to 8 and then just start again, or start again when I have jumped a fence. I think the most important thing to concentrate on is getting a really good active canter before you start and maintain this and keep the same rhythm throughout. If you do this and keep counting, I generally find I meet most jumps really well. Hope this helps.
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post #24 of 31 Old 07-10-2010, 06:46 AM
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Your job as the rider is to set your horse up good for the fence with straight lines, rythemic canter, and ensure that you riding up to the jump. If all this is in place a horse willusually pick his distance correctly. Its when as a rider you interfere and start driving on and checking that you begin to knock.
Don't forget that the horse looses sight of the jump just before takeoff and knows in advance the distance so if you start screwing around with speed your just setting up to knock.

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post #25 of 31 Old 07-17-2010, 09:21 PM
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for me, its getting THE canter, you know the one ;)
Where the whole thing just rolls :)
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post #26 of 31 Old 10-03-2010, 07:59 AM
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I really just let my horse sort it out, if she is rushing I know she will get there too soon and have to jump from a short spot, if I hold her back too close to the fence, then it will be wrong too. Get your whole approach calm and steady and your horse should work it out.
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post #27 of 31 Old 10-03-2010, 10:09 AM
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Its so weird, because my last lesson was literally giving me crap about my distances. It almost made me cry, because I thought I was solid on it.
My rule of thumb is when in doubt, push harder, just because I can take a jump huge and sit it comfortably but if she chips in I get all screwed up. She doesn't choose good distances on her own. When I let her do that every single jump is deep or wide. I can usually just tell when the jump is going to be awkward, then I usually just ask for it to be big rather than small. I wish I could get that one trick that fixes it. You know how things like this work- You can't figure it out but then one little thing gets it right for you. I need that.
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post #28 of 31 Old 10-04-2010, 12:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tymer View Post
Its so weird, because my last lesson was literally giving me crap about my distances. It almost made me cry, because I thought I was solid on it.
My rule of thumb is when in doubt, push harder, just because I can take a jump huge and sit it comfortably but if she chips in I get all screwed up. She doesn't choose good distances on her own. When I let her do that every single jump is deep or wide. I can usually just tell when the jump is going to be awkward, then I usually just ask for it to be big rather than small. I wish I could get that one trick that fixes it. You know how things like this work- You can't figure it out but then one little thing gets it right for you. I need that.
well, all I can say is keep going at it and hopefully you will start to feel when ypu need to hold your horse back, and when you need to push them into a bigger or faster stride.
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post #29 of 31 Old 10-04-2010, 10:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tymer View Post
Its so weird, because my last lesson was literally giving me crap about my distances. It almost made me cry, because I thought I was solid on it.
My rule of thumb is when in doubt, push harder, just because I can take a jump huge and sit it comfortably but if she chips in I get all screwed up. She doesn't choose good distances on her own. When I let her do that every single jump is deep or wide. I can usually just tell when the jump is going to be awkward, then I usually just ask for it to be big rather than small. I wish I could get that one trick that fixes it. You know how things like this work- You can't figure it out but then one little thing gets it right for you. I need that.
If all you are doing is verticals and smaller, narrower jumps (i.e, not oxers and high jumps), pushing for the long spots won't always hurt you, although it isn't always the smart move and can increase your chances of knocking a rail. Once the jumps get bigger and wider, pushing for the long spot can start to get dangerous. Not that there isn't a time to move up for the long spot, just that there are also times to take the tight spot too.

Working on lots of trot fences will really help you to feel the horses jump and learn to stay with them, even when you need to take a tight spot. It really helps you to feel them squat and push off the ground.

Trotting fences is also great for horses that get quick off the ground or lounge at jumps. It can help teach the horse to sit back and push off the ground, instead of lounge at the jump. That is what I am doing with my green jumper now. She would hurl herself at jumps, so we took her back to walking over jumps up to about 18 in-2 ft for about a month, then trotting her over jumps (we've worked on that up to about 3 ft) for several months. She's finally starting to learn that she has the power to get over the jumps without hurling herself at them. Only when she is solid and quiet jumping at the trot is she going to start cantering them again.

Last edited by PoohLP; 10-04-2010 at 10:19 AM.
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post #30 of 31 Old 10-04-2010, 10:26 AM
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I find it is harder to get the correct distances if I don't have the right canter. Although sometimes the bad spot isn't from the canter, it is from a bad turn/setup to the fence.

It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows. --Epictetus
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