Is he doubting himself, or can he really not do it? - Page 2
   

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Is he doubting himself, or can he really not do it?

This is a discussion on Is he doubting himself, or can he really not do it? within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category

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        08-26-2011, 11:29 PM
      #11
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by apachiedragon    
    You also have a horse that has an ongoing occasional lameness, according to you. He may not even be sound to jump. Some horses can take a large amount of flatwork perfectly well, but the stress of jumping is something else entirely. Have you asked a vet's opinion on whether you should even be jumping him at all?
    Yes, he cleared us completely
         
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        08-26-2011, 11:31 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    Did you read what you told us here?
    When I said sore I meant stiff.
         
        08-26-2011, 11:34 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Okay, apparently you guys don't get this; I've jumped up to 4'6, and shown 4'. I know how to jump, and I wasnt asking for pointers on how I ride, I just wanted to know if you guys had any suggestions to help my horse. It's not that I have a big ego, I just didnt want to say that I don't have the money for a trainer anymore, because I need that extra money to make sure I have it in case of emergency vet bills, etc. that's why I use this site, its free.

    And for anybody that still cares, he cleared it today. All I needed was the freaking fillers.
         
        08-27-2011, 12:12 AM
      #14
    Banned
    You seem very defensive, so you are not likely going to appreciate my opinion - but you asked for opinions.....

    Your horse refused twice and you fell twice in one show, I would suggest that your riding is very likely to be a factor. Jumping 4'+ on a horse that is well trained is completely different from jumping a horse that needs help.

    In addition to that your original post said that your horse managed the jumps at home but got nervous at a show - so if that is the case, then you jumping at home again has not resolved the issue.
         
        08-27-2011, 12:40 AM
      #15
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AlexS    
    You seem very defensive, so you are not likely going to appreciate my opinion - but you asked for opinions.....

    Your horse refused twice and you fell twice in one show, I would suggest that your riding is very likely to be a factor. Jumping 4'+ on a horse that is well trained is completely different from jumping a horse that needs help.

    In addition to that your original post said that your horse managed the jumps at home but got nervous at a show - so if that is the case, then you jumping at home again has not resolved the issue.
    I'm not saying that I'm a perfect rider; nobody is. BUT he refused because he had never dealt with that type of jump, with plants/fillers under it, (as well as nerves from being away from home) so we went home and practiced makeshift 'scary' jumps. By saying I jumped 4', I meant I do know how to jump and its not like its personally MY first time jumping 2'6. I guess saying that really didnt matter.
         
        08-27-2011, 12:51 AM
      #16
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by donatellodemerlieux    
    By saying I jumped 4', I meant I do know how to jump and its not like its personally MY first time jumping 2'6. I guess saying that really didnt matter.
    No, it does matter as it shows that you are not a complete newbie to jumping.

    Anyone can fall off at any time particularly when a horse refuses - however for it to have happened to you twice at one show, I would suggest that you were not preparing your horse for the jump correctly.
    I would assume that you were preparing to jump (yourself) rather than driving him to the jump and then getting into a jumping position as he took off.


    ETA - I also totally see pain as being a possibility from the old injury.
         
        08-27-2011, 01:22 AM
      #17
    Super Moderator
    The way I see it, the OP asked for possible reasons as to why the horse could do certain jump heights at home, but then refused them at the show. It is only natural to include rider error as a distinct possibility as a cause for this problem. Not turning words against you.
         
        08-27-2011, 01:34 AM
      #18
    Banned
    I believe the nerves of the rider to be more likely than the nerves of the horse from being away from home.

    I personally hate riding with an audience, I am nothing like the rider I am without.
         
        08-27-2011, 07:20 AM
      #19
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by donatellodemerlieux    
    I'm not saying that I'm a perfect rider; nobody is. BUT he refused because he had never dealt with that type of jump, with plants/fillers under it, (as well as nerves from being away from home) so we went home and practiced makeshift 'scary' jumps. By saying I jumped 4', I meant I do know how to jump and its not like its personally MY first time jumping 2'6. I guess saying that really didnt matter.
    You asked for help and ideas. Every idea that is offered you tell us how we are all wrong.

    Do you really want help and ideas?


    There are a lot of nuances that a rider can do that affect the horse, as any rider knows. These can be amplified when the rider and horse are in a different situation. Something the rider does that makes it more difficult for the horse to jump the horse might ignore at home. When in a more stressful location the horse might find the rider in the way enough to not go over the jump.

    I suggest you skip a show or two and hire a trainer. In the long run the trainer will allow you and your horse to enjoy each other more and the shows you do in the future will be less stressful.
         
        08-27-2011, 09:21 AM
      #20
    Teen Forum Moderator
    From my experience, a calm rider equals a calm horse. If he can clear the jumps at home with no problem, but not at the shows because of 'nerves,' he's most likely feeding off of your emotions and the small differences in the way you do things. Getting past your ego and looking at the situation from a different point of view is the first step. You have to be able to step back and look at yourself, critique your own riding, then try to fix it. Confidence channels through a horse just as well as fear or nerves do. That's why a trainer is the best idea, and why everyone is suggesting you have someone work with you and your horse. YOU can fix your horse, but it's going to take an outside eye to help you do that.
         

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