HELP! (English-western horse and rider) - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 21 Old 03-30-2010, 02:55 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Scoutrider and whitefoot your really helpful my horse is part throughbred so she's light weight!
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post #12 of 21 Old 03-30-2010, 02:58 PM
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Good luck :)


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post #13 of 21 Old 03-30-2010, 03:04 PM
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I volunteered when I was younger for our local 4-h club. I'm not saying the classes aren't challenging but alot of them are made for the youth/beginner riders in mind. The most jumping our riders did was all under 1ft.
At the club level yes. I'm an assistant leader, and our individual club shows don't usually even include a jumping class (the club is loaded to the gills with little leadline kids and gamers, lol). Our county show though tends to be full of overclassed kids, teenagers, and horses once the jumps are set up. All I'm saying is that, depending on what exactly the OP has been "signed up" for, it may or may not be a problem. I wish I hadn't left my rulebook at school! I could look up the height divisions. Granted there might be differences from state to state, but I imagine that jump height divisions and the like are relatively standard.

A stubborn horse walks behind you, an impatient one in front of you, but a noble companion walks beside you ~ Unknown
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post #14 of 21 Old 03-30-2010, 03:05 PM Thread Starter
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thanks im going to go to the clincs right away
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post #15 of 21 Old 03-30-2010, 10:30 PM
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English and western are very similar..
::Slaps head:: You're kidding me, right? Seriously, you didn't really mean that did you kiddo? Nothing could be further from the truth. English and western are MILES apart.

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post #16 of 21 Old 03-30-2010, 10:40 PM
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Thanks Scoutrider and whitefoot your really helpful my horse is part throughbred so she's light weight!
Umm...your horse's weight or "lightness" has NOTHING to do with your ability to jump.

Please, be careful if you decide to do this. I've watched people on the Quarter Horse circuit--experienced riders--nearly break their neck because they thought it would be 'easy' to do a hunter hack class. It's not, not, not!!! At least take a lesson or two beforehand.

Ooi!

Pam<---a 4-H leader who would never, EVER allow one of my kids' parents to enter their kid in a fence class with out proper training!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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post #17 of 21 Old 03-30-2010, 11:19 PM
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::Slaps head:: You're kidding me, right? Seriously, you didn't really mean that did you kiddo? Nothing could be further from the truth. English and western are MILES apart.
Unless the horse reins than no. The only major huge difference is the tack. But from what I've read the horse is TB that has been used as a western horse, but he was singed up for an english/jumping? Class, which means the horse was trained using direct contact, not neck reining.


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post #18 of 21 Old 03-31-2010, 02:11 PM
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The only major huge difference is the tack.
I am seriously baffled by this observation and wondering if you're doinking with me. It's possible you're joking, I suppose,'cause if you're not... Well, wow. .

Okay, so let me just say this: At the Quarter Horse World Show this past year, there were more than a few "western" riders that qualified in hunt seat equitation. How they managed to do this is a long story that would involve a rant on my part and so we won't go there , but suffice it to say, a few mostly western riders were in the hunt seat eq. Finals. Problem was, they had specialized english judges at the WS. Those judges asked these "western" riders to drop their irons. Honey, you should have SEEN the poop hit the fan. It quickly became apparent who were the "men" and who were the "boys". English is NOT western. It's about supporting your upper body with your base and riding slightly (very slightly on the QH circuit ) in front of the verticle, not on your pockets. It's about maintaining contact--the RIGHT amount of contact--with your horse's reins. It's about picking up the right diagonal without having to look and, if you know what you're doing, being able to do this without your stirrups. Ooi! I could go on. (The class winner was an absolutely stunning rider, by the way. You can watch her "winning run" on AQHA.com.)

Biggest problem I see with people who go from western to english is that they lose their base (lower leg) because there's no big-honkin' fenders on an english saddle to hold that leg in place. All we have are these little strappy things that cause most western riders to lose their balance and just about fall off. Never mind that we ride with our irons shorter than the average western rider. It can be dangerous. Nine times out of ten they end up hanging onto their horse's mouth for dear life. That, in turn, upsets the horse--chaos ensues. I've seen it a hundred, no a thousand, times.

I keep stressing to the OP to take a lesson or two before attempting to jump. I suspect that when she realizes how hard it is to hang on in that wittle postage-sized-stamp of a saddle, she'll scratch her classes. But I could be wrong.

As far as the horse being TB and so it should know "direct" rein, I have to disagree here, too. (Sorry!). Many TBs never even make it to the track. Many are sent directly to any Tom, Dick or Harry that is willing to break them. Who knows what they used in that horse's mouth? Ya know?

I'm not trying to come down on you or nothin'. Seriously. (Although I recognize it might feel that way.) I just really diagree with what you're saying and I've tried, truly tried, not to come of sounding like Queen B of the Universe while pointing out the fallacy of your observation. I hope I've succeeded.

Hugs!

Pamela Britton-Baer
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post #19 of 21 Old 03-31-2010, 03:00 PM
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Originally Posted by PBritton2U View Post
I am seriously baffled by this observation and wondering if you're doinking with me. It's possible you're joking, I suppose,'cause if you're not... Well, wow. .

Okay, so let me just say this: At the Quarter Horse World Show this past year, there were more than a few "western" riders that qualified in hunt seat equitation. How they managed to do this is a long story that would involve a rant on my part and so we won't go there , but suffice it to say, a few mostly western riders were in the hunt seat eq. Finals. Problem was, they had specialized english judges at the WS. Those judges asked these "western" riders to drop their irons. Honey, you should have SEEN the poop hit the fan. It quickly became apparent who were the "men" and who were the "boys". English is NOT western. It's about supporting your upper body with your base and riding slightly (very slightly on the QH circuit ) in front of the verticle, not on your pockets. It's about maintaining contact--the RIGHT amount of contact--with your horse's reins. It's about picking up the right diagonal without having to look and, if you know what you're doing, being able to do this without your stirrups. Ooi! I could go on. (The class winner was an absolutely stunning rider, by the way. You can watch her "winning run" on AQHA.com.)

Biggest problem I see with people who go from western to english is that they lose their base (lower leg) because there's no big-honkin' fenders on an english saddle to hold that leg in place. All we have are these little strappy things that cause most western riders to lose their balance and just about fall off. Never mind that we ride with our irons shorter than the average western rider. It can be dangerous. Nine times out of ten they end up hanging onto their horse's mouth for dear life. That, in turn, upsets the horse--chaos ensues. I've seen it a hundred, no a thousand, times.

I keep stressing to the OP to take a lesson or two before attempting to jump. I suspect that when she realizes how hard it is to hang on in that wittle postage-sized-stamp of a saddle, she'll scratch her classes. But I could be wrong.

As far as the horse being TB and so it should know "direct" rein, I have to disagree here, too. (Sorry!). Many TBs never even make it to the track. Many are sent directly to any Tom, Dick or Harry that is willing to break them. Who knows what they used in that horse's mouth? Ya know?

I'm not trying to come down on you or nothin'. Seriously. (Although I recognize it might feel that way.) I just really diagree with what you're saying and I've tried, truly tried, not to come of sounding like Queen B of the Universe while pointing out the fallacy of your observation. I hope I've succeeded.

Hugs!

Pamela Britton-Baer


^ this!!! I have to say its probably easier going from English to Western then it is the other way around. Both disciplines are harder then they look when it comes to show ready finesse. Any backyard rider can do whatever they want and do okay but yea... that's why I specified show finesse.

And also agree on the Direct/Neck reining. My horse is an Off the track thoroughbred. He raced until he was 4 and a half and you know what... the horse knows how to neck rein. Also with TB's from the track you have to teach them to be light on the bridle. Race TBs basically lean on the bit the entire race, and they need to be light in either disciplines which is a challenge in itself.

Gordon Wright once told a student to take up swimming because he would never be a good rider, that rider was George Morris.
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post #20 of 21 Old 03-31-2010, 05:58 PM Thread Starter
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Woow that's alot but thanks ill try to remmember it all
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