Help Needed With Jumping.
   

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Help Needed With Jumping.

This is a discussion on Help Needed With Jumping. within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category

     
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        05-07-2009, 05:47 AM
      #1
    Green Broke
    Help Needed With Jumping.

    Hey.

    Well I think I know what I'm doing when I train Chinga to jump. But I don't want to push him to fast or to hard because I understand that if you push a horse to hard or to quickly you can scare them, hurt them, or even you can get hurt.

    Now most people should know already how much I love and adore horses, Chinga in paticular. I also will never hurt Chinga deliveretly. So I need your help. Can someone please answer all or some of the following questions.

    1. How often should I jump him?- So how many times a week should I jump him.

    2. How many times should he be able to clear a bar at a level before we move the poll up?

    3. How long should the jumping sessions go for?

    4. What warm up activities do you suggest before we jump?


    There will be more questions to come, and as I said before I think I know the answer to theese questions but just want to doulbe check with the people who have had more experiance in horse training.

    I now have jumping boots on him as well, they do fit correctly.


    More questions:

    5. When training a horse to jump do I need to change my 2 point posistion at all to help the horse over the jump?

    6. Do I need to change my stirrup lengths at all for when I train him to jump? (I'm preety sure the answer to this question is no but I just want to be extra carefull)

    Thanks,

    Maddie,
         
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        05-07-2009, 04:22 PM
      #2
    Foal
    Right I've just checked see your horse he's a TB that was trained to race so really not something I would know much about!!
    ~I wouldn't jump more than once a week seeing as my own horses jump is established I can go weeks without jumping as when I do go to an event she could be jumping between 3 and 5 days on the trot!!
    ~You know your horse the best, when you do jump your horse does it feel like he's at is limit? With her I know she can go alot higher but keep within her comfort zone as I've only had her 2 months I've not gone bigger than 1.10m, If you do get to the stage where you are compeating in your warm up jump about 10cm over what the class height is but it's not really much over that..
    ~You don't want to tire your horse try and keep sessions short and finish on a good note, i'ld say for a novice horse 1/2 hour is plenty!!
    ~Warm up activities hmmmm.. I'ld say just get your horse listening to you first before jumping.. and some shortening and lenthening in canter.. if your horse is quite responsive just watch the lenthening doesn't buzz him up!!
    ~The two point is an American term if you meen jump postition as long as your jump postition secure and you give with you hands I can't see any reason to change it..
    ~As for stirrups go with your normal jump length..
    Hope this helps as I've said re training a horse that has been trained to race something I know nothing about!!!
         
        05-07-2009, 04:27 PM
      #3
    Started
    Send MIEventer a message, ask her to come check this out. I'm sure she can help you. :]
         
        05-07-2009, 07:14 PM
      #4
    Foal
    1- Jump him 2 times a week. (I would ride him 5-6 times a week) Jump 2x a week, GOOD flat work 2 other days and then a light fhack 1 or two other days.
    2- I wouldn't go on how many times he can clear it before you raise it, but more so how consistent the approach, jump, and away form the jump is. I wouldn't just keep raising it. Since you are just startig he probably doesn't need to do anything more than crossrails to 2'3".
    3- I wouldn't jump more than half an hour, but again, go on getting consistent jumps. If you get 2-3 good ones in a row, you can change it a bit, give him a break, so something else and end on a good note.
    4- I would say get some good flat work with bending in before you jump, but don't flat him really hard like you would on non-jumping days.
    5- Your 2 point will stay the same, the only thing you will do is add a little bit bigger release. DON'T throw your body down to your horse. That is NOT the way to help him jump. Your leg is what helps him over the jump...NOT your body.
    6- Your stirrups should be fine the length they are (Unless you do flat work with long stirrups, then you could go up a hole with them).

    Good luck! Have fun!
         
        05-08-2009, 03:27 AM
      #5
    Green Broke
    Thanks, guys! Today we did alot of flat work and I'm really happy with him he is listening to my voice alot now and also I am now using the kick alot less (used to only move with a kick). So now its just a squeeze.
         
        05-08-2009, 10:08 AM
      #6
    Trained
    Quote:
    Hey.

    Well I think I know what I'm doing when I train Chinga to jump. But I don't want to push him to fast or to hard because I understand that if you push a horse to hard or to quickly you can scare them, hurt them, or even you can get hurt.

    Now most people should know already how much I love and adore horses, Chinga in paticular. I also will never hurt Chinga deliveretly.


    None of us want to hurt our horses, at least I hope not. Lol. I love Nelson with all my heart and I try to do my best for him. We may do things to them without us realizing the errors, but what makes us amazing riders, is when we find out what we've been doing wrong, we can face it, admit it and then proceed to fix it.

    Quote:
    So I need your help. Can someone please answer all or some of the following questions.


    I'll do my best. I am not some phenom or high level rider/competator/trainer - I am just me, low level rider. I will do my best through what I've learnt and what I've gone through personally.

    Quote:
    1. How often should I jump him?- So how many times a week should I jump him.


    Limit it to once a week. You don't need anymore than that. Studdies show that our horses take allot of shock when they jump - it starts from when the hoof hits the ground, and moves up from there through their ankles, cannon bones, ankles, shoulders.

    We want to limit that. As Grand Prix Riders say - "A horse only has so much jump, why waste it" and I hold to that.

    Protect, Prevent, Preserve.

    We want longievity in our horses, while we keep them healthy through correct groceries, environment and conditioning.

    Many GP Jumpers only jump once a week - because of this.

    Quote:
    2. How many times should he be able to clear a bar at a level before we move the poll up?


    Try to not think of it as how many times can my horse jump a fence before he can progress. Think of it as, how much do we have under us training wise, and how well do we both go over that fence.

    Remember, the bigger the fence gets, the more strenuous it is for our horse - so make sure you have the essential building blocks under yourselves, conditioning and education.

    Quote:
    3. How long should the jumping sessions go for?


    20 minutes. No more. As Nuno Oliviera said *He was a phenom in the dressage world* "Better off to do it right in 10 mintues, than spending an hour doing it incorrectly"


    Quote:
    4. What warm up activities do you suggest before we jump?


    If you ride for an hour, and 20 mintues is of jumping - then spend 40 minutes doing flat work.

    Dressage is the fundamentals to all aspects of riding.

    I know Reiners who take Dressage Lessons, Barrel Racers - there are world champion barrel racers who take regular dressage lessons. And especially Jumpes.

    Jumping is Dressage with speed bumps.


    It is NEVER about the fence. NEVER! It is ALWAYS about the rhythm of the canter, how strait and balanced you both are.

    I can sit here and go over what one should work on, and I can tell you what I do - but I am on a well rounded, been there done that mount - so what I would do differs from what one would do on a green mount.

    What I would recommend is going to clinics. CLINICS!!! That is where I learn the majority of what is under you.

    Whenever a Clinitian comes to town - Olympic Level Jumpers and Eventers, Spanish Riding School Riders, Prix Saint George Competators - the list goes on - I MUST be there to learn.

    We only get so many chances to learn from these greats, so when they come - I take those chances. Whether I am riding under them, or Auditing - it doesn't matter...education is education.

    Then take home what you learnt from these riders, and apply it to your riding.

    Also, Coaching. There is nothing better than having an educated eye on the ground who can help you. BUT be very picky on who you choose as your coach. Far too many out there who think they can coach, who really shouldn't be - so really do your studdies on who you choose to work with you and your horse.

    Right now - I would really focus on Dressage for the majority. You want to accomplish the most important factors to riding first, before you start going over larger fences.

    Find a good coach who can help you with flat work and incorporating small fences here and there.

    Now, when you are jumping your cavaletti's and your x rails - which is what they should be, aside from trot poles - always incorporate dressage between the fences.

    Lots of balanced circles, lots of balanced serpentines - then do a small x rail or cavaletti. Then again - lots of balanced serpentines and circles. Then again, another small fence.

    Quote:
    5. When training a horse to jump do I need to change my 2 point posistion at all to help the horse over the jump?


    You always want to be a supportive rider. A rider who knows how to sit and wait and allow their horse to do their job and who can aid their horses, not interfear or impede.

    Again, I would highly recommend getting a coach.

    Quote:
    6. Do I need to change my stirrup lengths at all for when I train him to jump? (I'm preety sure the answer to this question is no but I just want to be extra carefull)


    You should always have 100 - 110 degree angles in your knees when you jump. You want to beable to stay off of your horses back to encourage them, while yet remaining functional in lifting, supporting and aiding your horse through your seat and your legs.
         
        05-11-2009, 01:22 AM
      #7
    Green Broke
    Thanks for your advice MIEventer, it helped alot as well as everyone else's advice:)
         

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