holding a horse back before the fence
 
 

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holding a horse back before the fence

This is a discussion on holding a horse back before the fence within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category
  • How to check your horse back when jumping
  • Dont hold back before horses

 
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    06-24-2009, 10:13 PM
  #1
Foal
holding a horse back before the fence

I have a thoroughbred and he gets quick before a fence. Should I hold him back and collect him but, at the last 2 (?) strides let him go? Or what?
     
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    06-24-2009, 10:15 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Work on getting a nice balanced canter on the flat before you start jumping at all. And if the that doesn't work, put cantering poles in front of the jump.
     
    06-24-2009, 10:50 PM
  #3
Weanling
Don’t just let him go but don’t just hold him back either. As you use your hand you also need to use leg. To give you an idea, my event horse, when I bought him was a horrible rusher. He had been prelim and was taken way too fast as a young horse. His previous rider rode him in spurs cross country even though he was a rusher. I was never brave enough to use spurs haha but he did need a lot of leg. If you use your hands, you have to use your legs too. Most horses that rush jumps end up on the forehand. You need to get him in a nice balanced canter, get his hind end underneath him and keep him up before you approach a jump. Also put a canter pole in front of the jump. If he starts rushing a few strides out from the jump, try placing about 7 to 8 canter poles in front of one jump. That way once he goes over the first pole he can’t change his pace any. But, start out with a small jump in case you have a crazy horse like my Hanoverian mare who just decides to make a pole + a jump a one big jump. Haha.
     
    06-24-2009, 11:41 PM
  #4
Foal
Dont hold him back as in pull hard on the reins to slow him down. Do half halts. And the number one thing is don't panic, it will sometimes just make it worse.
     
    06-25-2009, 05:06 AM
  #5
Weanling
As the others have said don't let him go.....

Horses rush when they are not comfortable.... he will sit back more as he gets more confident with his jumping...

Coming in to the jump get a rhythm and don't change anything.... hold him to the base of the fence if you let him go he will flatten out and not jump correctly. Stay tall and wait for the fence to come to you. Keep your elbows soft as if you lock up they will start to pull.. give them nothing to pull on

As the others have said use placing poles....

Or

Do a small cross with a pole around 9 baby steps (Toe to heel) either side and trot in.... then make it a verticle (Great for your possie too as it makes you wait for the fence which will also help slowing your horse.).... bring him back to the basics.... trot in and canter away until you are doing this calmly

Do you have an instructor that can help...? they may be able to give you more exercises....

Others include things like trotting a 20m cirlce in front ot the jump going over then another 20 m circle and over another fence....


The other thing - establish the pace before you are in front of the fence and not in front of the fence.... its all about the rhythm... I usually sing when I do my rounds to keep a rhythm (In my head)....
     
    06-25-2009, 12:44 PM
  #6
Weanling
Small gymnastics (usually with four or five jumps) with one stride in between can sometimes help a rusher. At first they rush and almost trip when they realize theres very little space between the jumps. It's actually almost comical. It only takes a few times for them to realize if they slow down, the jumps will be easier.
     
    06-25-2009, 12:55 PM
  #7
Weanling
Don't hold back because that'll just teach him to not jump correctly or to refuse. Try working on your flatwork - That's the basis of jumping. Try putting trot poles in front of the fence and a couple strides out.. you could also try a gymnastic combination. He can't run through a combination and he has to pick himself up and learn where his feet are, that could help a lot.
     
    06-28-2009, 11:57 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by jody111    
as the others have said don't let him go.....

Horses rush when they are not comfortable.... he will sit back more as he gets more confident with his jumping...

Coming in to the jump get a rhythm and don't change anything.... hold him to the base of the fence if you let him go he will flatten out and not jump correctly. Stay tall and wait for the fence to come to you. Keep your elbows soft as if you lock up they will start to pull.. give them nothing to pull on

As the others have said use placing poles....

Or

Do a small cross with a pole around 9 baby steps (Toe to heel) either side and trot in.... then make it a verticle (Great for your possie too as it makes you wait for the fence which will also help slowing your horse.).... bring him back to the basics.... trot in and canter away until you are doing this calmly

Do you have an instructor that can help...? they may be able to give you more exercises....

Others include things like trotting a 20m cirlce in front ot the jump going over then another 20 m circle and over another fence....


The other thing - establish the pace before you are in front of the fence and not in front of the fence.... its all about the rhythm... I usually sing when I do my rounds to keep a rhythm (In my head)....
QFT.

This is very good advice, couldn't agree more.

When horses rush jumps, it's either a. The rider's fault, b. A rhythm fault, c. The horse doesn't respect the aids or d. The horse is being pushed too far too fast and is scared.

Lets talk about them all in greater detail shall we?

Ultimately, it's always the rider's fault. Sucks, but it's true. A lot of riders tense before jumps, maybe clamp their leg on inadvertently and chase the horse to the jump... or maybe they haul on the horse's face trying to hold, hold, hold to the jump, see a spot, drop the horse and tell them to GO FOR IT. Either way, it's not pretty. Your job is to make your horse's job easy. Pick a rhythm, STICK to that rhythm. Sing 'row row row your boat' outloud (3 beat rhythm of the song helps maintain the canter). Don't ride to the fence, ride a stride past the fence. You sit back, you have your heels down, you ride the rhythm and you don't. Change. Anything. Going into the fence. You don't fight with your horse, you don't change your mind two strides out, you pick the pace and you stick to it.

Rhythm flaws and 'not respecting the aids' flaws pretty much go hand in hand. If the horse has rhythm flaws, it's either a rider error (like discussed above) or the horse doesn't respect the aids. Broken down to the simplest form, the horse has to know 2 things. 1. Leg means go. 2. Rein means who. Used in conjunction, that's when things get interesting. Your horse needs to be ridden in front of your leg, but behind your hand. Hence, riding your horse 'between your leg and your hand'. You need to make sure you have complete control of your horse BEFORE you start jumping. How do you do this? Flatwork flatwork flatwork. WTC, transitions, school figures, lateral movements etc... anything to get your horse calm, forward, straight and completely on the aids. You should be able to get a transition with a shift of weight, a turn with movement of the hips. You want to be in sync with your horse.

It is possible to have all this on the flat, and still have a horse who checks out to motel six the minute jumps come into play. In this case, a 'come to jesus meeting' is generally in order. Exercises like trot poles into a jump, gymnastics, circling before/after/over a jump all work great for getting your horse to check back in at the front desk. You've gotten a lot of good suggestions on here. My one exercise that I love is halting RIGHT after a fence. Imagine you are riding towards a cliff 3 strides after the jump. If you don't halt within those 3 strides after the jump, you WILL plummet to your death. How's that for motivation? First time you do it, it's not going to be pretty. That's not important. What's important is getting that stop. Your horse may almost sit down in suprise the first time. But eventually, he'll get the hang of it. After the horse starts catching on, they start going INTO the fence a lot softer, cause they know they're going to have to halt on the other side. Eventually, your horse is going to be respecting your aids a lot more because he/she knows you mean business.

As for your horse being pushed too far too fast, remember that horses are flight animals. When they get overwhelmed, they run. When you overface them, they run to try and get it over with. Always pay attention to how your horse is feeling, and don't ask for more than they can give.
     

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