The horse im looking at her owner says she doesnt like to jump anymore - Page 3
 
 

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The horse im looking at her owner says she doesnt like to jump anymore

This is a discussion on The horse im looking at her owner says she doesnt like to jump anymore within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category
  • The horse owner says

 
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    10-25-2010, 05:47 PM
  #21
Foal
Even if the "OP if is a troll", this is an interesting topic.

Being a catch rider in college and having a young opinionated greenie, I completely agree with the MIE's statement. However, I also agree to some degree with the idea that if a horse doesn't like something, they're going to do it anyway BUT the rider has to assess the situation and determine what's appropriate. If the horse is being a jerk about crossrails and crashes through them at the trot because he's lazy and saying "no I don't want to do this", (and NOT "no I can't do this because this is too physically difficult") that's a totally different situation from a horse disliking his discipline and saying "no I don't want to do this".

Again, my horse can be very opinionated, and my trainer offered the idea that at stages where the horse says "no" or is unsure of himself, primarily ask questions that you know you will get a response of "yes, ma'am!" and slowly build up these questions until you can start asking the more difficult ones with a higher success rate. ;)
     
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    10-25-2010, 05:49 PM
  #22
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIEventer    
Upnover - great post, but wasted, the OP is a Troll.
Not only that, but has since been banned.
     
    10-25-2010, 08:35 PM
  #23
Trained
^^^ But now under a new identity aka JumperGirl

     
    10-26-2010, 01:50 AM
  #24
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIEventer    
^^^ But now under a new identity aka JumperGirl
what did she do to get banned??
     
    10-26-2010, 08:54 AM
  #25
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by kerplop    
Even if the "OP if is a troll", this is an interesting topic.

Being a catch rider in college and having a young opinionated greenie, I completely agree with the MIE's statement. However, I also agree to some degree with the idea that if a horse doesn't like something, they're going to do it anyway BUT the rider has to assess the situation and determine what's appropriate. If the horse is being a jerk about crossrails and crashes through them at the trot because he's lazy and saying "no I don't want to do this", (and NOT "no I can't do this because this is too physically difficult") that's a totally different situation from a horse disliking his discipline and saying "no I don't want to do this".

Again, my horse can be very opinionated, and my trainer offered the idea that at stages where the horse says "no" or is unsure of himself, primarily ask questions that you know you will get a response of "yes, ma'am!" and slowly build up these questions until you can start asking the more difficult ones with a higher success rate. ;)
Great post!

(It would have been super great if I could read it with out putting my glasses on. That font is way too small.)
     
    10-26-2010, 10:10 AM
  #26
Trained
I agree Kerplop, and that's where Ian Millar's Quote comes into play - of course we don't allow our horses to do everything they want, but as Upnover said:


Quote:
Only to a small degree. My horse would love to cut off corners or fall in, but he's not allowed to. How many horses would pick work over lounging with their buddies eating grass? Even if they enjoy work, they still LOVE sitting around and eating. Doesn't mean my horse gets to be a bum. My horses have never missed a meal, a vaccination, a hoof trimming, a vet appt when necessary... I take great care of my horses, in exchange for them working for me. IMO, it's a fair deal. HOWEVER, it is also my responsibility to treat my horses well when they're working. Some horses simply do not want to jump. They will never enjoy it. They will never be successful at it. I don't think it's fair to try and make them jump. There are other disciplines for them to excel in. It is also my responsibility to be fair and train in a way that makes work a positive experience so that they don't get burned out or afraid of jumping. Can a horse get past this? Often, yes. With very very proper and correct training a horse can get over the fear of jumping. Rushing, refusing, and leaving the ground too early is caused by pain, fear, or plain bad riding/training. If you're looking at this horse to buy, I would pass. Maybe it'll work, but there's no guarantee. There are too many good horses out there to take a risk on something like her.
As what Ian Millar was saying, ties into this. While our horses have to work for us, there are limitations - where our responsibility comes into play, ensuring that we are doing it in unison with our partners.

As Reiner Klimke says " Our horses are our partners, not our slaves" and I agree.

But I also feel that Ian Millar was making a point of over use of gadgets, and making the horse move and work how you think they should - when we should be learning to ride how the horse needs us to, to get the best out of him/her.

That's what I take from it.


     
    10-26-2010, 11:07 AM
  #27
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by ponyjumper    
horses don't get to decide what they like and what they don't like. The girl that rides my pony for me (as I am too tall) Says taylor doesnt like draw reins, or trotting crossrails, well for now on everytime she rides him she is to ride with draw reins and to trot cross rails.

One thing I hate is draw reins, I wont have them anywhere near any of my horses as they are far far too easily used wrong and in 99% of cases are used to winch a head down without regard to what the back end is doing.

Stan used to decide if he wanted to jump or not, I never pushed the issue. He was overfaced as a young horse and he never realy got his confidence back. We'd pop the occassional log and on very very good days he would do a double clear round 2ft9. He was physically capable of doing a good 3ft 6 course and would happily jump huge solid XC fences but any bigger then 2ft 9 show jumps and no way on earth was he doing it and 2ft 9 was a rare occurance. I've had him put one of the best SJ'er in the country on the floor when he said no.
I didnt have the confidence, he didnt have the confidence so we didnt do it.

He did how ever do a superstar dressage test at quite a high level and he won a heck of alot in showing. That was what he was good at and enjoyed and because I didnt push the issue for other things we did realy realy well.
     
    10-26-2010, 06:52 PM
  #28
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by corporate pride    
what did she do to get banned??
From what I understand, she was posting pictures of horses that aren't hers, claiming them as hers, and claiming that it was her riding in the pictures when it wasn't.
     
    10-27-2010, 01:16 AM
  #29
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by MIEventer    
^^^ But now under a new identity aka JumperGirl

So has JumperGirl been banned as well???
     
    10-28-2010, 09:41 PM
  #30
Weanling
IMO it really depends on the horse. I bought a prelim eventer a few years ago. Most honest horse I'd ever seen. When I bought him I was doing novice and after a few months I was schooling all prelim and training jumps on him. He didn't think twice about them. Never had a xc penalty in his life. When I bought him he was 12 and he didn't do well on the flexion test but passed the xrays. He was such a sweet horse and it was very obvious that he had been beaten in his past. He was terrified if you so much as swatted a fly off him. And the one time I fell off he ran to the corner of the ring and was trembling when I walked up to him. I always said "the day this horse stops at a jump with me, is the day he is retired". Well one day he did stop and I fell off. He was so afraid I was going to beat him for it. I think when he learned that I wasn't going to beat him, he started to refuse more and more to the point where it was dangerous and I was falling off every time I rode. He was terrified of the jumps. I never once got on to him thought, I just couldn't bring myself to do it. He was so sweet and willing in everything but jumping and had done so much for me before he started refusing. So I just stopped jumping him. Vets could find nothing wrong with him, so I think he was having mental issues with it. I think that he was taken to fast as a young horse, he had some stops, and was taught that if he didn't jump, no matter how much pain he was in, he was going to be beat. When he learned that I wasn't going to beat him, if he didn't feel 100% about the jump, he knew he didnt have to do it. If he was younger and had not been a prelim horse, I would have attributed it to bad behavior and fixed it. But it was obvious he was terrified to jump. Whether it was mental issue or he had some pain somewhere that vets could not see, I don't know, but he is now retired from jumping and is straight dressage. So IMO if the horse you are looking at is anything like my horse, I would not try to make her jump again. So it really depends on the horse and her history I guess.
     

Tags
dressage, jumping, mare, thoroughbred for sale, training

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