How High Can He Go? - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 19 Old 03-18-2017, 01:17 AM Thread Starter
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Talking How High Can He Go?

Hay y'all! Im sure you regulars have heard an EARFUL about CJ from previous posts about him, but here goes again...
1. Gentle, sweet, and very friendly
2. Always up to try something new; curious
3. 15.2 hh, a perfect height for me imo and lots of others' opinion
4. Jumped 2'4" for the first time today!

We usually jump about 2 foot verticals, 1 foot-1.5 foot crossrails. Today I went out to jump, and the jumps seemed a little higher than usual, but I disregarded it as me not having ridden in a couple days straight. Well, turns out that the jumps were 2'4", and he took em like a champ! I had been wondering why I had gotten complete air on the first jump... because he way over jumped it!

Anyways, I definitely want to build him to be able to jump higher, not on a regular basis, because he's 13, and not the most coordinated little guy. He NEVER trips after landing a jump, it's usually just his toe hits the ground and his leg gets under him accidentally. But I do want to be able to jump 3 foot with him at some point. I definitely think he's up to it, he never shows exertion after an hour of riding including warm ups and a about half of the time jumping, and I know he can jump extremely well. And he loves it! Just wondering what the you guys would recommend for his max height.

I've seen people all over the internet say not to try to find out how high a horse CAN jump, because you will have to find out how high they CAN'T jump, which understandably you don't ever want to do. Just theoretically, what do you think? You can find videos of us in a couple forums I've posted before.

Last edited by Colby Jack Seige; 03-18-2017 at 01:22 AM.
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post #2 of 19 Old 03-18-2017, 02:55 AM
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He sounds like an easy going happy sort of clutz. That scares me a little for jumping honestly.

If I remember right you're also a novice.

So as you know the answer is maybe, but I would also think of it as "how much training will it take to get BOTH of us to that point, safely".

I'm concerned about his lack of coordination. Horses are generally pretty coordinated and any one that isn't would stand out to me as something NOT to jump.

I think, unless he decides to get serious and that fixes the problem, that you will find that to be a much bigger safety concern and stop before worrying about how high he can go.
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post #3 of 19 Old 03-18-2017, 07:45 AM
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For me, height doesn't factor it is how a horse jumps that matters.

I have seen 12.2 ponies easily clear big rails out with hounds yet refuse at a 2' show jump.
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post #4 of 19 Old 03-18-2017, 09:07 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Yogiwick View Post
He sounds like an easy going happy sort of clutz. That scares me a little for jumping honestly.

If I remember right you're also a novice.

So as you know the answer is maybe, but I would also think of it as "how much training will it take to get BOTH of us to that point, safely".

I'm concerned about his lack of coordination. Horses are generally pretty coordinated and any one that isn't would stand out to me as something NOT to jump.

I think, unless he decides to get serious and that fixes the problem, that you will find that to be a much bigger safety concern and stop before worrying about how high he can go.
I'm going to try bell boots on him, and see if that gets him a little more focused. It've gotten a couple videos of him tripping and ever time it's just because he doesn't pick one of his hooves high enough. Like I said, he's very comfortable jumping, and I've had trainers with 50 years of experience look at him and tell me its alright.

He does trip, but he's got quite good reflexes. I've thought of the possibility of neurological issues, but asked a vet when she came out to look at his teeth, and she said, after i walked him trotted him and cantered him that she would be extremely surprised if he had any neurological issues.

Maybe there's something better than bell boots to make him think more carefully about his feet?
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post #5 of 19 Old 03-18-2017, 09:54 AM
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I've never heard of using bell boots to make a horse pay attention to his feet but I guess you could try it.

What I would suggest for a horse who is lazy with his feet is lots of pole and cavaletti grids to start. When you are jumping use landing poles to help him figure out how he's supposed to get back together after the fence.

As just an anecdote the only horse who I knew who stumbled a lot, especially after jumping, ended up having terrible navicular problems. So just keep an eye out on him if the stumbling ever changes.

Mains doux - Jambes forts - Esprit sensť

Je n'ai pas peur dans la selle
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post #6 of 19 Old 03-18-2017, 10:01 AM
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At some point he will not have the scope to go higher. It all depends on his conformation, fitness, heart AND the ability of the rider. You should have your trainer on the ground supervising tell you his athletic ability and scope.

Some paints( I think that is what he is?) are built for jumping, some destroy their bodies when they do it.
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post #7 of 19 Old 03-18-2017, 10:41 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Dehda01 View Post
At some point he will not have the scope to go higher. It all depends on his conformation, fitness, heart AND the ability of the rider. You should have your trainer on the ground supervising tell you his athletic ability and scope.

Some paints( I think that is what he is?) are built for jumping, some destroy their bodies when they do it.
We think he's a QH Paint mix. Probably tons of other stuff just mixed in with it, he's my little mutt :)
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post #8 of 19 Old 03-18-2017, 10:44 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by SansPeurDansLaSelle View Post
I've never heard of using bell boots to make a horse pay attention to his feet but I guess you could try it.

What I would suggest for a horse who is lazy with his feet is lots of pole and cavaletti grids to start. When you are jumping use landing poles to help him figure out how he's supposed to get back together after the fence.

As just an anecdote the only horse who I knew who stumbled a lot, especially after jumping, ended up having terrible navicular problems. So just keep an eye out on him if the stumbling ever changes.
See, thats the thing about his stumbling, he never trips after a jump. I mean sometimes we'll canter a circle after a jump and when I bring him to a trot he'll trip. He never trips at a canter, but sometimes at a walk but usually at a trot.

One of my first trainers uses bell boots on horses to get them to pay attention to their feet, as does my current trainer. Guess it's just a North Alabama thing!
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post #9 of 19 Old 03-18-2017, 10:58 AM
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The rider is one of the biggest factor in how high a horse can jump. Get a horse balanced, straight, stay out of their way, and you will impress them. They should give it back in kind.
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post #10 of 19 Old 03-18-2017, 11:33 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by ApuetsoT View Post
The rider is one of the biggest factor in how high a horse can jump. Get a horse balanced, straight, stay out of their way, and you will impress them. They should give it back in kind.
I've definitely had this drilled into my head from my trainer. Now we have a good rhythm, and we move as a whole, not as two separate beings. I used to not release enough, and he would run out of jumps, but now I know exactly how much I need to give him, and let my hands slip through the reins if need be. He jumped 2'4" like it was a piece of cake, and I've only got one video from my friend who was out with me, and watching it, he jumps it like a 2' jump; hes never completely in the air, and he has complete control of the height he's jumping. Probably gonna go out today and do more 2' and maybe one 2'4" at the very end just to get him to remember what we did yesterday.
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