It's alot harder then it looks - Page 3
 
 

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It's alot harder then it looks

This is a discussion on It's alot harder then it looks within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category

     
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        05-30-2008, 06:53 PM
      #21
    Foal
    Yeah I totally agree, the people at my barn jump 3 ft. And it looks SO easy! Lol. But its really not. I was thinking about jumping my mare, but she is unable to jump due to soundness issues.
         
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        06-13-2008, 08:45 AM
      #22
    Foal
    I get so annoyed when people say that it's not a sport and that it's the horse that does all the work.
    Whenever people say that the rider just sits there I say " Thanks for the comliment!" They don't get how it's a compliment but it is because we want to make it look effortless and if they say that you just sit there that means you're a very good job of making it look that way. My brothers say that and my parents said that I'm aloud to get my trainer to give him a riding lesson.
         
        06-17-2008, 12:26 AM
      #23
    Showing
    You will get the hang of it. Believe it or not, the bigger they get, the easier they are to jump. Keep working on it
         
        06-17-2008, 06:05 PM
      #24
    Foal
    It is difficult yes
    But I found tht when I put training poles up it made me more confident with jumping.
    I have been ridin for about 3 n a half years n I've onli just started to jump.
    To make gettin ready for the jump easier trot up to it, and when you get everything right to what feels correct trot n then canter in the last 4 or 5 metres it makes it easier x
         
        06-19-2008, 08:38 PM
      #25
    Showing
    The more jumping you do, the more you will find your position comes together. Make sure you have good basics/foundation to build on before moving to bigger fences.
         
        06-22-2008, 08:57 PM
      #26
    Foal
    Ok, I didn't read the other posts but..

    Heels DOWN!! :)
    When you go over the jump your basically over exaggerating your 2 point position + giving with your hands. Make sure you look up to where you want to go. You stand up slightly in your stirrups, fold at the hips and push your bum to the BACK of the saddle.
    Pushing your bum back will help you get you balance back to your centre of gravity when you land, try not to lean forwards too much, you don't need to over small sized jumps as long as you get off of their baack.

    When I jump, I think about standing up and pushing my bum alllllllllll the way back. And it makes it to where I want it most of the time
         
        06-22-2008, 10:34 PM
      #27
    Foal
    The biggest tip I can give is to open yourself up to the horse... I don't know if that really makes sense. If you have a trouble-maker of a horse, don't get frustrated.. but make the adjustments, keep a level head, and ride on. Jumping is complicated; there's a lot to keep in mind, but as long as you stay still (on the inside. And thus move with the horse) it should be a lot easier. I dunno... jumping for me is kind of therapeutic so I'm just naturally calm and it helps me to keep balanced and riding well.

    Second, always always always keep in mind that your heels should be down. If your heels are down, you will automatically be gripping lightly with your legs and it should help to keep your legs still. You might be jumping for the horse, too. If so... count the 3-4 strides before the jump and it'll help establish a rhythm so you're not jumping ahead.

    :)
         

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