The jumping with approval only rule
   

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The jumping with approval only rule

This is a discussion on The jumping with approval only rule within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category

     
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        01-10-2011, 10:10 AM
      #1
    Yearling
    The jumping with approval only rule

    I want to start a discussion about the jumping with approval only or during lessons rule. This is primarily for boarders that own or lease their own horse...

    No doubt a lot of barns have this rule... how do you feel about it? Do you feel it's more for the rider or for the horse?

    When do you feel a horse is ready to jump?

    When do you feel a rider is ready to jump?

    Do you feel that this rule has been enforced and is effective?
         
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        01-10-2011, 10:19 AM
      #2
    Banned
    I have no problem with a rule that does not allow anyone to jump unless they are in a lesson or under approved supervision. I am guessing it makes the BO's insurance very happy too.

    Quote:
    Do you feel it's more for the rider or for the horse?
    Both. A fun time jumping a bunch of stuff wrong can take weeks of training/lessons to fix for both the horse and the rider.

    Quote:
    Do you feel that this rule has been enforced and is effective?
    Yes. It would have be a really sneaky rider to not be noticed jumping and it is highly unlikely that they could get away with it for very long with out someone mentioning it to their trainer/BO.
    But honestly, it really takes having like minded people as boarders/leasers for this to work. If the barn is a learning/showing barn where the long term progression of the horse and rider are stressed vs not being able to jump whenever being some type of punishment there is really no issue with the rule.
    If you are backyard place where some people do fun shows, some do not show at all and others want to be serious; it will be a hard rule to have and stick to.
         
        01-10-2011, 10:31 AM
      #3
    Yearling
    I forgot to add... Do you expect to ask the trainer or barn owner before jumping? Or do you just jump until they approach you about it?
         
        01-10-2011, 10:45 AM
      #4
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by starlinestables    
    I forgot to add... Do you expect to ask the trainer or barn owner before jumping? Or do you just jump until they approach you about it?
    Hu?

    It is something I ask about before choosing to board there.

    It is not something I assume one way or the other once I am there.

    If the barn has not posted policy I am guessing the average person assumes they are free to jump whenever they want.
         
        01-10-2011, 11:34 AM
      #5
    Yearling
    At the barn I boarded at that was only enforced for people under 18 years old. 18+ you could jump whenever you wanted. It's because of insurance that under 18 can not jump alone and that's quite understandable. For the most part I was okay with it, sometimes I really didn't like it. I have one horse that at home I jump 2-3 times a week but the jump lessons are half flat work. At the barn he got an hour long jump lesson once a week, not my prefered way for him but I couldn't do much about it.
         
        01-10-2011, 11:49 AM
      #6
    Weanling
    I have never even heard of this rule! And If I were to board my horse at a barn, I would want to jump when I wanted, not when the owner said I could, if i'm paying for full use of facilities. Unless your talking about people with green horses or beginner riders who aren't ready to jump yet?? I've never boarded as we have our own barn but since my sister is away at college she has to board her horse. The only rule they have is that you can't trail ride alone, which I can understand but she is paying ALOT of money and since she has full use of facilities, should be able to go when she wants. I mean she signed a release form saying she can't sue for anything that happens so I don't know why it matters if she goes on a trail alone. I've never been a fan of boarding, but I'll have to when I go away for college next year.
         
        01-10-2011, 12:08 PM
      #7
    Trained
    I do agree with it, and totally understand it. That does not mean I always liked it. As a "mature" adult, I preferred to be able to jump my own horse when I want. Any "untraining" I may do would be my problem. However, I would never jump when noone is around. (meaning at least in the barn and aware that I am there). I never like to see anyone under the age of 18 doing it.
         
        01-10-2011, 12:17 PM
      #8
    Yearling
    At my barn approval means showing me whether or not you and your horse are capable of jumping regardless of age.
         
        01-10-2011, 12:27 PM
      #9
    mls
    Trained
    I would think it means more - don't do it alone. Not that injuries can't happen if you only lunging but jumping puts the rider and horse at more risk.

    If the policy means 'approved to jump' - then I would hope the person doing the approving actually knows something about the event/sport.
         
        01-10-2011, 01:19 PM
      #10
    Trained
    I could see that for the 18 and younger crowd, but as an adult who is capable of jumping but has no money for lessons right now, I'd prefer the freedom to do as I choose. I realize everyone is sue crazy, but in Connecticut, if you got on your horse willingly, you're on your own. It relies on common sense, imagine that.
         

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