Jumping Critique - I know it's bad! - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > English Riding > Jumping

Jumping Critique - I know it's bad!

This is a discussion on Jumping Critique - I know it's bad! within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category

    Like Tree3Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        08-25-2013, 11:29 PM
      #11
    Started
    I hate seeing riders hold their two-point to the base of a jump, I wouldn't suggest it.

    I WILL suggest grid work, lots of it. Bounces especially. Drop your stirrups (but not your legs, keep your toe up, don't get floppy) and work on bounces.

    You need to relax your shoulders, pull them back a little bit and become a little more supple through your arms, bringing them out from where they're crunched right in to your sides. Your stirrups look a bit long, and you're standing way too high up out of the saddle, bring your bum down and back a little, sink your weight into your heels and your leg forward to the girth (your leg has swung back a whole lot).

    Looking at your pictures there's NO WAY you should be jumping as big as you are right now, especially without instruction from a coach. Keep the grid work little and get your EQ down FIRST.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        08-26-2013, 12:05 AM
      #12
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alexischristina    
    I hate seeing riders hold their two-point to the base of a jump, I wouldn't suggest it.

    I WILL suggest grid work, lots of it. Bounces especially. Drop your stirrups (but not your legs, keep your toe up, don't get floppy) and work on bounces.

    You need to relax your shoulders, pull them back a little bit and become a little more supple through your arms, bringing them out from where they're crunched right in to your sides. Your stirrups look a bit long, and you're standing way too high up out of the saddle, bring your bum down and back a little, sink your weight into your heels and your leg forward to the girth (your leg has swung back a whole lot).

    Looking at your pictures there's NO WAY you should be jumping as big as you are right now, especially without instruction from a coach. Keep the grid work little and get your EQ down FIRST.
    Not to worry you or anything, but I've jumped up to 4ft, bareback and with a saddle I've been working on bounces and a lot of gymnastics over the past few days. I can already feel a difference.

    I have had 2 coaches in the past. The first one let me jump up to 4ft with her instruction. She said I was doing good. But she was the reason my horse started rushing jumps. The second coach had me over crossrails, which bored my horse and myself to the point where I stopped wanting to jump.

    I'm doing jumping to have fun, not to be flawless. I feel safe going over the larger jumps, and that's the only way I am actually improving my eq. I feel the weight in my heels now, and my release already have improved so much. They are just things I never really noticed I was doing, until I looked at the pictures. I really am working hard to improve, but I don't want to throw away what work I have put in
         
        08-26-2013, 04:49 PM
      #13
    Started
    Just because YOU feel safe doesn't mean you ARE safe. Jumping for fun is one thing, but jumping 2'9 - 3'0 plus with bad EQ IS an accident waiting to happen. It's dangerous and IMO should be done correctly or not at all (and you can jump correctly and still have fun )

    You need to 'throw away' the work you've put in, because it hasn't resulted in the correct outcome. Trust me when I say that bringing it down a notch will do far more good for you than putting the jumps up.
         
        08-28-2013, 10:19 AM
      #14
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alexischristina    
    Just because YOU feel safe doesn't mean you ARE safe. Jumping for fun is one thing, but jumping 2'9 - 3'0 plus with bad EQ IS an accident waiting to happen. It's dangerous and IMO should be done correctly or not at all (and you can jump correctly and still have fun )

    You need to 'throw away' the work you've put in, because it hasn't resulted in the correct outcome. Trust me when I say that bringing it down a notch will do far more good for you than putting the jumps up.
    I'm working on it, a lot
         
        08-28-2013, 10:52 AM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Do you work with a trainer, at all? Critiques on the internet can only go so far...
         
        08-29-2013, 01:22 AM
      #16
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zexious    
    Do you work with a trainer, at all? Critiques on the internet can only go so far...

    I used to.
    Here is my trainer experience in the last 5 years:
    4H for like 2 years, under a very good pleasure horse trainer and an all around trainer.
    Hunter Jumper trainer for maybe 3 months, but she taught me how to make my horse rush jumps.
    Eventing trainer for 3 months until she moved away. She knew what she was talking about and was by far the best trainer I've had. She really helped my horse stop rushing jumps, and taught us a lot of dressage basics.

    Now, I am in Highschool Equestrian under one of the old 4H coaches and a pleasure rider. I don't listen to their "good jobs" since I know I'm not doing 100% great like they make it seem.

    I am working on getting another coach, but I need to get myself a way to and from a trainer, which I don't have. Now, I am self teaching myself. I feel the difference in my riding now, just making a few small changes. Before I could ride and be done without soreness or exhaustion. Now I get off and my muscles hurt and I have just enough energy to untack my horse and get inside.

    Next week Saturday I have to jump a 2'6 course, which I am very confident on doing. My horse is honest and makes me look way better than I am.

    I'm working on getting a video of me riding and jumping, asap. It's hard when I ride alone to record myself.
         
        08-29-2013, 09:34 PM
      #17
    Yearling
    Here is a video from today: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgpR1zNFIM4

    It isn't the best quality, but it's something. I do see improvement. I ducked down on a jump or two, and my release still isn't the best, but I think I am getting better.
         
        08-30-2013, 03:17 AM
      #18
    Started
    I'm sorry, but that video shows me a rider who doesn't know what to do with herself over fences more than half the time. I will reiterate what I said before, I think you need to go back to smaller jumps and work on your position, your release and your strength.

    You're out of tune with your horse and remaining in a forward position isn't helping you very much, you're constantly getting incorrect distances and getting bounced out of the tack, planting your hand on the neck and yanking BACKWARDS instead of getting a good forward release. Your arms are rigid, even on the flat between jumps, and you're fighting with your horse. When you do manage to stay with your horse you've got some pretty significant chicken wings going on (elbows sticking out to the sides).

    Additionally, if you're going to trot a jump, please make sure your horse has enough impulsion to get over it comfortably.
    updownrider likes this.
         
        08-30-2013, 08:17 AM
      #19
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by alexischristina    
    I'm sorry, but that video shows me a rider who doesn't know what to do with herself over fences more than half the time. I will reiterate what I said before, I think you need to go back to smaller jumps and work on your position, your release and your strength.

    You're out of tune with your horse and remaining in a forward position isn't helping you very much, you're constantly getting incorrect distances and getting bounced out of the tack, planting your hand on the neck and yanking BACKWARDS instead of getting a good forward release. Your arms are rigid, even on the flat between jumps, and you're fighting with your horse. When you do manage to stay with your horse you've got some pretty significant chicken wings going on (elbows sticking out to the sides).

    Additionally, if you're going to trot a jump, please make sure your horse has enough impulsion to get over it comfortably.

    So what do you say? I put a pole on the ground and call that a jump?

    I see improvement in my legs. That's what I was pointing out. I paused the video when I was going over the jumps, and my heels are starting to stay down since I'm using my lower leg.

    I would really like some exercises I can do rather than just "go over lower jumps". How do I fix my rigid arms? How do I fix my crap position? That's what I need help on since I have no available trainer in the area and no way to get to one.

    I've been watching the how-to videos, videos of people just jumping so I can look at the position, reading exercises, reading a ton of forums, TRYING to figure out how to fix myself. Like I said, I'm trying.
         
        08-30-2013, 08:44 AM
      #20
    Yearling
    Another 2 cents here. First, your position HAS vastly improved though it is interesting to read you think it has gotten worse. In the pics for three years ago you had a very textbook beginner with little to no training style..I know..I had that same style. In the second set of pics, as indicated earlier, you were standing in your irons which pushed your upper body forward..not unusual in a green jumping style. This was due to not dropping the weight into your heel and not folding into the 2-point. Your release looks to be more of a hands on neck open release (note straight line from elbow to horse's mouth) vice the crest release I think you were actually trying for. Resting the hands on the neck is a classic out-of-balance or no balance red flag.

    In a crest release you would move your hands up the horse's neck and rest on the top..not down on the side. IN an open release your hands are already in the right position (even if by mistake) but you would not be touching the horse's neck with your hands. In this article, look at George Morris for the proper crest release..not the other rider. The article greatly over exaggerated the issue with a crest release as that particular rider is not in the proper form in any way shape or form of two-point and definitely not a form that is actually taught (if she was taught that position then her trainer needs to be fired).

    Horse jumping release: The crest and automatic release in jumping

    Some ideas..and some of these are repeats :).

    1. Lots and lots of flatwork 2-point. An instructor I had in Louisiana had us do nothing BUT trot two-point for the first 15 mins of each lesson..and yes she timed it. I rode with her for three years; the first 4 months I could barely walk after dismounting. After that time, however, I had the strongest leg imaginable and my two-point was rock solid. The idea, however, is to do a proper two-point. Weight in heels, shoulders back, head up. Fold at the hip..picture in your mind pushing the horse away with your hands (both on the flat and while jumping). This helps you get your hip in the right position and keeps your weight centered.

    2. As for holding two-point to the base, this isn't a bad thing when working on balance. The idea there isn't to just get in to two-point but keeps the inexperienced (or just relearning jumper) into position early to keep from getting left.

    3. Exercises through a small grid (crossrails or tiny verticles set at about high cavaletti height, 12 inches?, holding arms out to the side will help.

    It is not a bad thing to go back to the low basics. I've been riding for over 30 years and jumped a good 25 years of that (dressage only now). All my trainers at some point took a week or two every 6 months or so and brought us back down to basics....back on a lunge line if we ended up alone for whatever reason or doing those simplistic grids etc. This happened more often if the class was getting cocky and the jumping position was beginning to suffer.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Is jumping bad for horses? hberrie Horse Talk 6 05-02-2012 09:52 AM
    Jumping Position - as bad as I think it is? Dartanion Horse Riding Critique 4 04-23-2009 01:16 AM
    is my jumping position really bad?? hannah_xx Jumping 11 10-08-2008 10:55 PM
    Jumping Lesson (Went bad :O) Vicizmax Horse Riding Critique 37 08-17-2008 04:51 AM
    Really Bad Jumping Form? LukeyD Horse Training 1 10-07-2007 04:12 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:26 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0