Lack of depth perception/no 3D vision - impact my ability to jump?
   

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Lack of depth perception/no 3D vision - impact my ability to jump?

This is a discussion on Lack of depth perception/no 3D vision - impact my ability to jump? within the Jumping forums, part of the English Riding category
  • Impact of lack of depth perception
  • 3d vision lack

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    11-10-2011, 11:20 PM
  #1
Foal
Lack of depth perception/no 3D vision - impact my ability to jump?

Hello all,

I've been riding for five months now and one day I would really, really love to learn to jump. I was born with no 3D vision and cannot determine how far something is from me (I can tell simple things, but if someone throws a ball my way 9 times out of 10 it'll either hit me in the face or I'll miss completely) and I'm concerned it'd prevent me from jumping because I cannot definitely tell how far away a jump is/distance between jumps just by looking.

Do you rely more on counting your horse's strides than your sight to know when to lift yourself out of the saddle etc?

I know I'm far too inexperienced to even look at a jump (no pun intended :P) but I'd love to have a crack at it one day. Any input/advice will be much appreciated.
     
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    11-10-2011, 11:26 PM
  #2
Green Broke
I think you should find a good trainer that has some school master hunter type horses. A good trainer should be able to teach you to feel when the horse is going to jump, so that you would be able to jump with the horse. I don't know how advance you seeing is so I don't know how far you would be able to go with jumping, but I'm sure with a good trainer and the willingness to learn, you should be able to atleast be able to jump 2ft.
     
    11-10-2011, 11:34 PM
  #3
Foal
Thanks for the quick response, myhorsesonador! Besides the no 3D and no peripheral vision/lazy right eye (can you tell I came from the shallow end of the gene pool? :P) my vision is good. I can drive and don't wear glasses. I'm not planning on doing big league shows or anything but just jumping for the sake of learning to jump and improve my all-round riding ability.

Edit: I have a great instructor who really understands how I learn and I wouldn't trust anyone else to teach me! I don't have my own horse but maybe one day I will...
myhorsesonador likes this.
     
    11-11-2011, 12:08 AM
  #4
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilly    
Thanks for the quick response, myhorsesonador! Besides the no 3D and no peripheral vision/lazy right eye (can you tell I came from the shallow end of the gene pool? :P) my vision is good. I can drive and don't wear glasses. I'm not planning on doing big league shows or anything but just jumping for the sake of learning to jump and improve my all-round riding ability.

Edit: I have a great instructor who really understands how I learn and I wouldn't trust anyone else to teach me! I don't have my own horse but maybe one day I will...
I got all the bad genes from both my parents so your not the only one. :P It might slow me down some times but I will endure through it, and I will never let it stop me from doing what I love. :)

I'm glad you have a good trainer. I never did find a good one around here.
     
    11-11-2011, 09:23 AM
  #5
Yearling
I think once you get the feel of jumping you'll have no problem at all. I actually think you'll have an advantage because you have to rely so much on feeling the horse's rhythm that you won't anticipate jumps and get ahead of your horse. But definitely learn on a well trained horse at first.
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    11-11-2011, 10:10 AM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by ErikaLynn    
I think once you get the feel of jumping you'll have no problem at all. I actually think you'll have an advantage because you have to rely so much on feeling the horse's rhythm that you won't anticipate jumps and get ahead of your horse. But definitely learn on a well trained horse at first.
Couldn't agree more! In fact, my jumping improved when my new coach told me to stop trying to manage my horse so much with counting strides and to let him worry about when to jump. I just need to drive him forward, keep him straight and keep his pace steady. Result is a lovely, steady, rounded jump.
     
    11-11-2011, 10:18 AM
  #7
Yearling
My instructor started teaching my group how to jump about a month or two ago, and she has us just letting the horse jump and not worrying about distance or what not yet.

I think you'll be able to jump just fine!
     
    11-11-2011, 10:20 AM
  #8
Showing
There's a blind teenager who's barrel racing. He's allowed to have something that buzzes placed in the middle of each barrel. His horse quickly picked up on this. Would something like this help you guage the distance from the jump?
     
    11-11-2011, 10:49 AM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
There's a blind teenager who's barrel racing. He's allowed to have something that buzzes placed in the middle of each barrel. His horse quickly picked up on this. Would something like this help you gauge the distance from the jump?
This is so inspiring! Reminds me of a blind woman who used to share the same coach as me. Our coach would put different sounding buzzers at each of the letters around the arena to help the rider navigate around the course. She didn't jump, but I bet she could have.

I would think that a lack of depth perception wouldn't require a buzzer, however. The rider learns to feel the horse's jump. I've jumped with my eyes closed and it is a wonderful feeling.
     
    11-11-2011, 07:01 PM
  #10
Foal
Yep, I'm with everyone else. I'm sure you could manage it, even without having to count strides. To start, I would have you on a very experience horse, at least until you get the feel of jumping. My mare is one of those that I don't have to count strides with and she hits the right spot, by herself, a majority of the time.

Plus, those times that your horse might not hit their spot is good for you too. You learn to ride the jumps that don't go quite as smoothly as they should.

The biggest thing is to get at trainer who understands what's going on and can help you learn to jump by feel and not by sight. There was a wild idea that popped into my head when I read this thread of what I would do if you were my student. I would put you on an experienced horse, on a lunge line, with cavalletti to start off with and blind fold you. Yep, blind fold you. That way, you're get used to jumping by feel and not by even trying with your sight. Once you were comfortable with that we take the blind fold off and add tiny jumps. Crazy I know lol.
     

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